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May 26, 2009 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2009-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SECURING THEIR SPOT

OPINION
Granholm should
get benched
This Michigan governor
is too political a choice
for the Supreme Court.
SEE PAGE 5
ARTS
Dancing with the
parody stars
The Wayans discuss their
latest spoof film "Dance
Flick" with the Daily
SEE PAGE 9
SPORTS
From Great Lakes
to Great Plains
Victory over Baylor sends
'M' to Oklahoma City for
the College World Series
SEE PAGE 11
INDEX
Vol CXIX, No.138 . 2009 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com
N EW S ................................... 2
OPINION ......................... 4
CLASSIFIED.............. 6
A RTS ................................ ... 9
SPORTS ................................. 11

CLIF REEDER/Daily
Senior captain Teddi Ewing is lifted by her teammates after the Michigan softball team beat Baylor 7-1 on Saturday, May 23 at
Alumni Field. The win secured the Wolverines a spot in the 2009 college World Series in Oklahoma city.
'U'libraries on Google

weekIy summer Edition
MARIJUANA CLASS
Seminar
on drugs
a success
Oaksterdam offers
classes on laws and
usage of marijuana
By ERIC CHIU
For the Daily
Last weekend at an event
sponsored by California-based
Oaksterdam University, more
than 300 people packed the Best
Western Executive Plaza in Ann
Arbor, for the first marijuana ed-
ucational seminar held in Michi-
gan-since the passage of Proposal
1 last November.
During the seminar, audience
members asked many questions,
demonstrating a general lack of
knowledge about the issues sur-
rounding marijuana usage. Oak-
sterdam University Executive
Chancellor Dale Clare attributed
the lack of knowledge to the cur-
rent state of marijuana educa-
tion.
"It's not just a lack of infor-
mation (about marijuana), but an
amount of disinformation and'a
misunderstanding, or misrepre-
sentation, of some information
and just a total vacuum in some
places," Clare said.
Oaksterdam University
President Richard Lee founded
the university.in Oakland, Calif.
in November 2007 to teach stu-
dents about the various aspects
ofmarijuana policy. Classes in the
See MARIJUANA, Page 2

Google Book Search
will solve the hassle
of hunting for books
By STEPHANIE STEINBERG
Daily News Editor
A contract between Google and
the University will soon allow stu-
dents to browse through Universi-
ty library stacks from the comfort
of their own homes.
Paul Courant, a University eco-
nomics professor and dean of li-
braries, signed an agreement last
Wednesday with Google Book
Search that will give Google access
to scan and digitized nearly 6 mil-
lion of the University's books. In

return, the University will receive
a cost-subsidized subscription to
the entire online book database
- both from the University's col-
lection and other contributing li-
braries.
"We think that the future of
library scholarship includes the
ability to access a digitized li-
brary," Courant said.
Rather than searching through
shelves to find a particular book,
students will be able to find the
entire book on their computers.
Courant said the advantage of
this access is that students will
be able to find and read the Uni-
versity's "hidden books," the ones
filed away in library stacks that are
difficult to access.
Last year, the Authors Guild and

the Association of Ataerican Pub-
lishers sued Google for scanning
books without getting permission
from the copyright owners. The
University decided to try the new
systemafterGooglereachedasettle-
ment with the two groups regarding
ownership rights to the texts.
The University's agreement
with Google calls for libraries and
universities to pay a subscription
to Google Book Search, which will
allow students to read full texts
from their desktops.
Overall, the new system will in-
crease the accessibility of books,
which Courant said was a key
factor in his decision to sign the
agreement.
Dan Clancy, engineering director
See GOOGLE, Page 2

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