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April 08, 1991 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-04-08

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Monday, April 8,1991

ANALYSIS
Continued from page 1
termine the upcoming appointment
of a new city administrator.
"I think the qualities the
Democrats will be looking for are
separate from the qualities
Republicans will be looking for,"

Eckstein said.
"It would be someone who. not
only has business skills and finan-
cial skills ... but someone who does
kind of believe in a grass-roots
democracy," Eckstein said.
Nevertheless, the council could
agree on one candidate as it has in the
past, Ouimet said, such as former

City Administrator Del Borgsdorf
and Police Chief Douglas Smith.
"I don't view it as Us vs. Them,"
Ouimet said. "We're all in this to-
gether in working for the commu-
nity. There will be some things that
we differ in, but others where we'll
agree."

'U' to receive $3 million

Calvin and Hobbes

WH1A.T ARE oV NPA ENGAGED
voGt OJT !N IN A CTS
WE~ RAI ? OF'VAUS ! IT
ME AANT
NATUJR
1 4'4 N
PS OF TODM.~,
RESPOND ~1T TE
NA4ME "CALV4I"
4:

WICta of I)S IS GOING TO
GIVE U FIRTm? nVWV
RP WRG, OR AM I OIN
To GIVE UPAAND Go INSIDE?
93 FOR, its UNDEIED, BUT
LtA DETRINED T1WN0
FRO A NOWN0%, I WS
TO K ADDR ESSED NS
"C.ALVIN 1- OL

by Bill Watterson
POORGU
JST COIAT
koAOUT ALO\Y SO, CALIN
CA ET E B~ OLILL
DERANED ?BEIN.REFERRING
TO WtASEUP 1N
- qTiQP-A
laz

by Garric
Daily Staff
The Uni
stitutions tc
grant fromi
Foundation
ucation in th
sciences.
"We
Fellowships
source in c
doctoral stu
Ph.D. progra
vice provost
Rackham dec
"The Fot
program are
high attritio
grams in th

k Wang summer.
Reporter The five programs selected
versity is one of nine in- Rackham to receive funding are:
D receive a $3 million thropology (ethnology), classic
the Andrew W. Mellon studies, classical art and archaec
to support doctoral ed- ogy, English, and history.
he humanities and social D'Arms said Rackham's self
tions were based on the quality
see the Mellon the department's faculty, gradue
as a wonderful new re- students, and the department's
ur efforts to expedite terest in improving its docto
dents' progress through program.
ams," said John D'Arms, "The Mellon grants help s
for academic affairs and dents at two critical points in t.
an. doctoral education," s
undation's goals for the Anthropology Professor and Ch
to reduce unacceptably Richard Ford.
n rates in doctoral pro- "The first point is after a s
e humanities and related dent achieves candidacy. They v

CALV4INS R1cAT. BWt'Ts
't1 E BOLD)?1W'iNEW NPAE
FOR TlE. REST
4 m IE

social sciences and to reduce the
time students take to earn Ph.D.s,"
he added.
The grant will provide 37 fel-
lowships each year for five years to
students enrolled in five LSA doc-
toral programs. The fellowships
will be given out starting this

be supported while they are apply-
ing for research grants to do field
work.
"The second point is after they
return from field experience. They
will be supported while writing
their dissertations."
D'Arms said graduate students

receiving candidate fellowships
will receive financial support for at
least one summer. Students receiv-
ing dissertation fellowships will be*
supported for one full year.
Recipients of the Mellon fel-
lowships will receive tuition
waivers and a monthly stipend to
cover living and miscellaneous ex-
penses.
Ford said only outstanding stu-
dents who will be completing their
doctoral dissertations on an acceler-
ated timetable can apply for the
Mellon fellowships. A review
committee from each department
will select the fellowship recipi-
ents from the submitted applica-
tions.
The other universities selected
to receive the Mellon Dissertation
Fellowships are: Cornell,
Columbia, Harvard, Princeton,
Yale, and the universities of
Chicago; Pennsylvania; and
California, Berkeley.
ompetition
The photograph will vie for a
$5,000 prize in the society's June na-
tional convention at the Virginia
Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond.
The convention also offers seminars,
classes, and an awards ceremony for
all the regional winners.
Insinger looks forward to at-
tending. "It will be a good chance to
see a wider range of work from peo-
ple with different backgrounds,
from different schools, and with
different philosophies," he said.
"It's always nice to receive recogni-
tion, but it's equally important to
see others' works and to share and@
learn."
University art school graduate
Tess Raymo won second place in the
competition; third place was taken
by art school junior Sally Casper.

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Daily

Classifieds

'U' grad w
by JoAnne Viviano
Time spent in Japan proved more
beneficial to 1990 University grad-
uate Mori Insinger than he had an-
ticipated.
Last month, the alumnus ac-
cepted a $500 award for taking first
place in Michigan in the National
Society of Arts and Letters (NSAL)
photography competition for a pho-
tograph he took while abroad.
Insinger graduated in August
with a B.A. in sociology and a BFA,
then worked in Japan from
September until January. During his
stay, he lived with a Japanese family
and helped the father construct a
studio. He also taught English to
the family's children .
"I went completely on my own
with no expectations or concrete
plans," Insinger said. "I didn't want

ins photo c
to be limited. At first, I thought I
might teach in schools, but I soon
became disappointed with the posi-
tions available.
"I wanted to learn about the cul-
ture and the people. I felt it would
be more intense to live with a fam-
ily, to be within the culture as op-
posed to outside of it.
"It didn't pay off as well mone-
tarily, but in exchange for not mak-
ing a lot of money, I saw things
which I felt I was very fortunate to
experience," he added.
Insinger's prize-winning photo
captures a woman farmer carrying
bamboo poles through a rice field.
"The light quality is what is inter-
esting," he said. "It's later in the
day with light coming through
haze."

.

WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO WITH YOUR
B.A. IN ENGLISH?
TUESDAY, APRIL 9
7:30 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION KUENZEL ROOM
PANELISTS:

Kalyn Johnson
Jelena Kristovic
Parker Moon
Ken Small

Associate Broadcast Producer
University Relations
Editor
Gale Research
Technical Writer
World Computer Corporation
Computer System Consultant
Information Technology Division,
University of Michigan
Career Counselor
Career Planning and Placement
Assistant Professor Of English
University of Michigan

- 25 Copies on Resume Paper
" 25 Matching Blank Sheets
- 25 Matching Envelopes
ONLY $600

MODERATORS:

BASH
Continued from page 1
him on the ground - the kid was
clean," Riddle said.
Riddle said he was disappointed
that the city police were not pa-
trolling.
"I remember last year, I wanted
my souvenir ticket. I was joking
with an Ann Arbor officer that they
should set up a booth and for $15
they should give out a $5 ticket, and
take a Polaroid picture... but the
University cops aren't going to stop
me from coming out here," Riddle
said.
LSA sophomore Nathan White,
VICTIM
Continued from page 1
fled the scene.
Ann Arbor firefighters, who
were first on the scene, said the vic-
tim was in cardiac arrest when they
arrived. CPR was discontinued
when the police arrived.
"She died as a result of head in-
juries," Jinkerson said. "We don't
know if it was her head hitting the
curb or the car."
Kruse was wearing sweatpants
and running shoes at the time and
carried no identification. She may
have been wearing a walkman, which
was found next to her.
Witnesses at the scene said they
believed the automobile ran a red
light.

who was hanging out in a drum cir-
cle after the speeches ended said, "I
just don't understand why people
are scared of legalizing marijuana.
Look at all the people out here
peacefully having a good time. This
is a great day."
White also commented that
there was less hashish on the scene
than there was last year.
This is in line with this year's
NORML slogan, "A joint is not the
point."
Thom Harris, president of the
local NORML chapter, said this
year the emphasis was less on the*
Bash of Hash Bash and more on seri-
ous political lobbying for legaliza-
tion of hemp.
Police reported little progress
on the accident investigation as of
Sunday afternoon. "I don't think we
have anything concrete at this time,
no," said Sgt. Mark Hoornstra.
"One vehicle was looked at but
it was not conclusive," Hoornstra@
said. "There should be damage to the
right front near the fender, and pos-
sibly the windshield.
"We believe the car is a bur-
gundy Cutlass Supreme two-door
with silver trim, probably a 1989 or
'90 model. But some witnesses said
the car was a hatchback. That would
fit the style of a Pontiac LeMans,"
he said.
"We're really asking for citizen
help in this incidence," Jinkerson
said. Anyone with information is
asked to call the Ann Arbor police
at 994-2878 or 994-2865.

Tom Lehker
Juan Leon

kinko's

Sponsored by: Department of English Language and Literature
Career Planning and Placement

JUST OPENED

D rag out your history books and
you'll discover that John Allen and
Elisha Rumsey were the two men,
with somewhat tarni shed histories,
who founded Annarbour in 1824.
Life has become more complex in
the last 167 years, but a few simple
pleasures remain. The new Allen &
Rumsey Restaurant is alt ou t to
revive one . . . a great s teak,
at a great price!
\d.

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