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April 05, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-04-05

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, April 5, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson Union stewards protest for a

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by Laura DePompolo
Daily Staff Reporter
American Federation of State,
County and Municipal Employees
(AFSCME) union members united
yesterday in front of the Fleming
Administration building to protest
harassment, racism, work speed-up
and mandatory overtime.
Patricia Darden, president of the
AFSCME local #1583, spoke at the
GEO rally emphasizing that it is
important for the members of all
University unions to stick together
and support one another.
Judy Levy, bargaining chairper-
son for AFSCME, said that if the
GEQ strikes she will request a
membership meeting to vote on

joining the strike.
"The University won't give any-
thing unless they have to," she said.
Therefore, it is important to have a
strong unity of unions on campus,
she added.
Levy said that presently there are
about 500 grievances that the
University has yet to answer.
Darden said that the grievance
process consists of four stages. The
first two stages are meetings be-
tween the employee, the union
stewards, and university supervisors
and representatives.
AFSCME has accused six
University supervisers of harass-
ment and is currently in the third
stage of the grievance process. In the

CITIZENS
Continued from page 1
"I think our biggest problem is
the University administration is
unwilling to deal with Black stu-
dents," Morgan said, pointing out
that the onlyadministrative atten-
tion to student complaints has come
from Black administrators who
don't have the power to take action.
"The message from the administra-
tion is loud and clear - you're not
students - you're Black students,"
Morgan said.
LSA junior Devlin Ponte, Con-
cerned Citizen and speaker for the
Black Student Union, addressed
Black students' fears and concerns.

"There is a deep fear of Housing
officers, Ann Arbor police and Uni-
versity police. And it's not just
from this macing incident," he said.
At the beginning of the meeting,
students passed out letters ad-

meeting to represent concerned par-
ents and to testify that she had sent
at least 250 letters to Duderstadt.
Prof. Emeritus Dr. Al Wheeler
urged major Black student unions as
well as Black faculty and adminis-

third stage the university may take
45 days to make a decision.
In the first two stages, the
University decided there was no vi-
olation of contract.
James Thiry, personnel director
of the University and bargaining
chair for the University, said the
volume of grievances submitted by
the AFSCME is quite high in com-
parison to the other six unions at
the University but has remained
consistent throughout the past fewO
years.
"Its not that we don't appreciate
the merit (of the grievances). We
focus on understanding the issue, the
facts surrounding the issue and the
terms of the agreement," Thiry said.
Vice speaker of the Black
Students' Union Shawn Mason said
Duderstadt's secretary had told her
that the President would be i
attendance.
No University officials could be
reached to confirm this information.

'The message from the administration is loud
and clear - you're not students - you're
Black students'
- Caurnel Morgan
Concerned Citizen

MEETING
Continued from page 1
Duderstadt received an invitation to
the meeting via electronic mail
Wednesday night at 10:45, but had
already scheduled to entertain

guests.
"His schedule is incredibly full.
These kind of last minute demands
are unrealistic," Clarkson said.
Swain said she also got her invi-
tation through MTS late last night
but previous plans she had made pre-
cluded her attendance.

dressed to Duderstadt outlining the
concerns of Concerned Citizens and
asked members to sign and send the
letters.
Morgan's mother, Edith Mor-
gan, drove in from Detroit for the

trators to join together. "We're just
putting out brush fires and not go-
ing at those Kuwaiti oil mines that
exist on this campus," Wheeler said.
Fred McCuiston, president of
the Ann Arbor chapter of the
NAACP, pointed out the impor-
tance of a meeting between Con-
cerned Citizens and Mayor-elect Liz
Brater. Brater did send a representa-
tive to the meeting.

I K

GEO
Continued from page 1
and the state mediator to make a
promise we weren't sure we could
keep or else the negotiations would
stop," he said.
Dolgon added that because the

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University did not give the GEO
bargaining team the letter before
Wednesday, the GEO steering com-
mittee was justified in its decision
to hold the work stoppage yester-
day.
"They (the University) knew
over the weekend that we were
planning the work stoppage. If they
were going to let mediation hinge
on that they should have notified us
sooner," he said.
However, University spokesper-
son Colleen Dolan-Greene said she
felt that the GEO bargainers should
have gone into the negotiations with
the authority to call off the work
stoppage.
"They shouldn't have been bar-
gaining unless they have the author-
ity to call off the work stoppage,"
she said.
Dolgon said the University held
off on giving GEO the letter until
Wednesday in an attempt to make
the GEO bargainers look bad.
"They wanted to us to call it
(the work stoppage) off and look
like assholes. They waited for us to
get to the table, but they. should
have let us know ahead of time," he
said.
Dolan-Greene was upset by the
work stoppage.
"I'm surprised because they
promised as of 10 p.m. Wednesday
night that it (the work stoppage)
wasn't going to happen," she said.
Director of News and
Information Services and
Administration Spokesperson
Joseph Owsley also expressed the
University's disappointment with
GEO.
"We are disappointed that they

had a work stoppage after they said
they wouldn't," Owsley said.
University General Council Elsa
Cole said that the work stoppage is
illegal on two different counts.
"The work stoppage violate
state law and the provisions of the
extension of the contract between
the University and GEO," said
Cole.
The work stoppage would be a
hindrance to continued mediation
since the private mediator may step
down if one side breaches any tem-
porary agreement made by two par-
ties, Cole said.
Cole added that if one mediato
decides to break mediation it is dif-
ficult to obtain another because
most. mediators would consent to
the previous mediator's decision.
Kay Dawson, Assistant to
Provost andwVice President for
Academic Affairs Gilbert
Whitaker, said no official action has
been planned against the. TAs who
participated in the work stoppage.
"It is my understanding that the
University has the legal right to
take action but no decision has been
made," she said. "The primary con-
cern is that classes were held (off-
campus) or that they will be made
up.
Whitaker issued a memorandum
to department heads and deans advis-
ing them in forming procedures in
the case of a prolonged work-stop*
page.
Charles Jamerson, the state me-
diator, could not confirm when the
next mediation session would occur,
but did express his willingness to
settle the matter quickly.

UMNI CE

=:7---

-

ENTER
9:00-10:30
10:40-12:30
1:30-3:15
3:15-3:45

M, the MEDIEVAL AND
the DEPARTMENT OF
PARATIVE STUDY OF
DNS (CSST)
INFORMATION

RALLY
Continued from page 1
tant," said GEO President Chris
Roberson. "We started to get
somewhere (Wednesday night). I
hope we'll be able to pick up where
we left off."
Roberson said he felt that GEO
and University negotiators were
definitely closer to agreement after
the first mediation session.
"The mediator may be a little
mad at (the University), too,"
Zundel said, "Because for four
months they've been saying 'no, no,
no,' and last night they said

'maybe'."
In addition to the rally, GEO
held a teach-in at the Michigan
Union Ballroom.
"There are two key issues -job
security and working conditions,"
said GEO steering and bargaining
committee member Corey Dolgon.
Undergraduates also voiced their
feelings about the GEO strike.
"It's not fair that the University
expects the same quality from a full
professor and a TA, but the TAs get
paid less," said LSA junior Robbi
Sackville-Clough. "I want to have a
TA that is being paid well enough
to do their job correctly."

ae £ricgan ai1

NI

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