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April 03, 1991 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-04-03

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, April 3, 1991

Iraq
NICOSIA, Cyprus (
state press said yesterd
a few more days woul
to stamp out fightingv
rebels, who reporte
skirmishes around the
center of Kirkuk.
The collapse of Ki
tance in major cities
Dohuk and Zakho indii
bellion was crumbling
the northern region and
their inevitable end i
official Iraqi News Ag
the newspaper of thei
Party as saying.
INA, monitored
quoted the Al-Thawra
as saying Kurdish areE
purged of rebels b
Saddam Hussein reg
days and the region wo
an unspecified degree
autonomy.
Foreign journalists,
western Turkey over

drives out
AP) - Iraqi and rivers said Iraqi government
lay that only forces controlled much of the
d be needed Kurdish area, with hundreds of
with Kurdish thousands of Kurdish refugees try-
d renewed ing to escape into Iran and Turkey.
strategic oil Both countries readied for a
flood of people across the borders.
urdish resis- The Turkish news agency
like Erbil, Anatolia quoted the journalists as
Gated the re- saying an unidentified reporter was
throughout killed and two others injured in the
i "they know Kurdistan fighting. Many. got to the
s near," the border by hanging onto the rears of
ency quoted trucks, the agency said.
ruling Baath Spokespersons abroad for
Kurdish rebels reported skirmishes
in Cyprus, yesterday between government
newspaper troops and guerillas on the high-
as would be way from Kirkuk to Erbil and in
attling the areas east near the Iranian border.
ime within The office for the Patriotic
uld return to Union of Kurdistan in the Syrian
of political capital of Damascus said the
rebels had retaken control of the
fleeing into road linking Erbil and Kirkuk, lost
mountains last Friday, and have advanced on

Kurds
the city's suburbs after a heavy
battle.
The Kurds, fighting for auton-
omy since the 1920s, have with-
drawn into the mountains many
times before to regroup.
Rebels have repeatedly ac-
cused allied coalition members,
especially the United States, of
abandoning them by not enforcing
the cease-fire ban on Iraq using its
aircraft for military missions.
In Washington, the State
Department announced that it is
inviting a cross-section of Iraqi
dissidents to a series of meetings
with U.S. officials. But there was
no indication that President Bush
would abandon his hands-off policy
on the rebels' struggle with
Saddam.
Tehran radio quoted refugees as
saying that despite martial law,
the Shiite Moslem rebels in the
south were still staging hit-and-run
attacks on government positions.

RESCOMP
Continued from page 1
halls to gauge student opinions on
the program.
"The purpose of these forums is
to allow students an opportunity to
provide input on those services
which they feel are most important
and to make recommendations that
may result in restructuring the or-
ganization and altering delivery of
services," Simoni said.
The forums, facilitated by
ResComp staff, are open to all stu-
dents currently living in the resi-
dence halls, whether or not they
plan to live there next year.
Simoni noted that over 98 per-
cent of the incoming first-year stu-
dents will live in residence halls
with ResComp clusters, and the
only people who can represent them
are students who live there now.
Forums will take place today
and tomorrow at a number of resi-
dence halls on campus. The informa-
tion gathered from the forums will
be considered as ITD and Housing
continue to meet.

4

South Quad & Fletcher
Tomorrow
8:00 pm
West Lounge, South Quad
West Quad
Tonight
8:00 pm
Ostafin Room, West Quad
Alice Lloyd & Couzens
Tonight
6:00 pm
Red Carpet Lounge, Lloyd
Tomorrow;
9:30 pm
Red Carpet Lounge, Lloyd
Barbour/Newberry
Tomorrow
8:00 pm
Newberry Library

East Quad & Oxford
Tomorrow
8:00 pm
Madrigal Lounge, East Quad
Mosher-Jordan &
Stockwell
Tomorrow
8:00 pm
Nikki G Lounge, Mosher-
Jordan
Markley
Tomorrow
7:00 pm
Concourse Lounge
Bursley & Baits
Tomorrow
6:00 pm
East Lounge, Bursley

.f

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson QTR TE

I KRUA 4{OE C6P DEv
IS P'RAE 10 S~AES .
' WORAM.

NAE CO U ON~\ 8 PE ~t
COOD AS AN ABTRAC2tOC*.
1IE Wf~ATED To ThNZME ME .
NE. SMCTRALAA2EYD JUSTI
TIMEA~
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FASCINATING. iES ,
o
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_
_
+
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TO DO "{1NR SIDEI 1S tO
YOUR!SELF. PIAS\CN' KING,
~~T IND WIOM
"T MUTt''CA
EASIER TO,
. IGNORE,

Continued from page 1
pressed his support. "The TAs are
definitely justified in their - de-
mands. Classes are too big and
something needs to be done about it.
When they keep raising tuition I
wonder why they can't pay the TA's
more," Jung said.
Another undergrad, first-year art
student Christina Reyes, disagreed.
"The benefit from the experience of
teaching at the University should be

enough, although the smaller
classes they ask for would benefit
everyone," she said.
Kirsten Bancroft, a first-year
LSA student, noted that one of her
TA's discussed the issue during
class. She supports the GEO and
said, "The TAs should at least get
enough money to cover standard of
living costs because now they don't
get enough."
Alan Zundel, bargaining
spokesperson for the GEO, stressed

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CHALKER
Continued from page 1

it-----

they should have had enough money
to cover the legal cost.
Ochoa said SRC did not have the
money to cover the fees. "I am very
happy (with the resolution) espe-
cially because it is not self-serving.
It's a precedent for other student
groups on campus."
Incoming president James Green
said this resolution was passed in
the spirit of the old assembly and
not the new one, which will begin
REPORT
Continued from page 1
cent.
Holbrook explained the large
discrepancy between increases in
administrators and students as part
of the University's attempt to en-
hance the quality of undergraduate
education.
"Schools are generally anxious
to bring down the student-faculty
ratio to get smaller classes. In some
sense, you can say (the increase in
administrative and faculty posi-
tions) is good because it is a reflec-
tion of growing resources that are
available to students," Holbrook
said.
For example, the Business
School is a department which hired
more faculty and administrators to
supplement undergraduate educa-
tion, Holbrook said.
In 1980, the Business School fac-
ulty taught night courses in addi-
tion to their regular load. When the
current Provost and Vice President
for Academic Affairs Gilbert
Whitaker was Business School dean,
he hired additional faculty so night
courses could be included as part of
a professor's normal responsibili-
ties.
Technological and social ad-

the common interests of undergrads
and TAs. "Undergraduates should,
understand that GEO is trying to
improve classroom conditions for
both TAs and students, resulting in
a better quality education," he said.
There will be a teach-in at the
Union tomorrow from 11 to 3 p.m.
to discuss GEO issues. A rally at the
Cube in support of the GEO will
follow the teach-in. Zundel said all
students are encouraged to attend
the events.
work next week.
The assembly also ratified sev- k,
cral other resolutions which were
passed without quorum at earlier,
meetings. These included resolu-
tions to: support the efforts of the
Graduate Employees Organization,
criticize the University for not tak-
ing a stance on the South Quad mac-
ing incident, call on the U.S. gov- '
ernment to give full benefits to the
Persian Gulf War veterans, and call
for open dialogues between students
and members of the Board of
Regents.
vances that have been made since
1980 offer another explanation for
the large increase in administrators
as opposed to students.
"People are doing a lot more de-
velopment and feedback than they
used to. Ten years ago one would not
find a development officer, now we
have a development office,"
Holbrook said. "One wouldn't have
any minority affairs staff 10 years f
ago, now we have an Office of
Minority Affairs."
Director of the Office of
Academic Planning and Analysis
Marilyn Knepp, a compiler of the
report, cautioned against using the
report's numbers themselves to
make conclusions.

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"Without knowing what caused
changes, one cannot draw conclu-
sions about (increases) being right
or wrong. It should be considered a;
management tool," Knepp said.
"I hope the report will be an im-
portant tool for managers to look at
their staffing patterns in a different
way," Holbrook said. "The report
encourages people to look at
staffing changes and see if they're
justified," he added.
This report was not the first of
its kind at the University. In 1978,
Business School Professor Alan'
Spivey published a similar report.

f ! lk ON
-dFE" - ON

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
for two terms, $22 for one term. Campus delivery $28 for two terms. Prorated rates: Starting March 1,
1991, $11 for balance oftterm to 4/24191.
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I

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Andrew Gottesman Sports Editor
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Kloostra, Donna Woodwell Arts Editors
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S

CounselorsS
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..u wih vurirhest

News: Chris Afendulis, Lari Barager, Jami Blaauw, Marc Ciagne, Lynne Cohn, Laura DePompolo, Brenda Dickinson, Rebecca
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Arts: Greg Baise, Jen Bilk, liene Bush, Andrew J. Cahn, Beth Coqult, Jenie Dalmann, Richard S. Davis, Michael Paul
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