100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 27, 1991 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, March 27, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson MSA

SM', CALVI1N, W40,S'JSE?
THAT NIC GRL 'io'JWERE T
DOWN ~THE SIET TALKING To
S PKSTbTVI M USEW
JEK
r{ 7
Ai

tES. 1 1r 5
U RED T

A~T N1 . WRY, IT A
I MVE! IW WA.NT
TO MAKE IT
LOK LIKE I

UPSE TIAIS~ ft
s V i i i
Too~I*3f~. S~E t'-
yAitt
3'1)? z

Dooder State College

i THINK WE COULD DO
SOME THINGS RIGHT
ON CAMPUS. LIKE ALLO-
CATE FUNDS FOR FREE
TUTORIAL SERVICE
FOR STUDENTS, OR...

g~ C-* $ 'NISAIAr,
51 0SNT5..K4.? '
.T . NA..7

WELL, I GUESS WE
ARE ALL IN
AGREEMENT HEERE.
resolutions calling

by Alan Landau
NOW ONTO THE FOR-
IEGN POLICY AGENDA.
.
'c 1
Building next Thursday at 3 p.m., in
conjunction with the University
Service and Maintenance employees
union;
a rally next Monday, in front
of President Duderstadt's lawn at
12 p.m., and;
a teach-in next Thursday, at
the Union from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Continued from page 1
fighting for: no cops, no war.
These are not left-wing
fantasies," Dolgon said. "I am not
going to let this defeat what I
stand for and what these
movements stand for. There are
plenty of leaders for these
movements. I will continue to be
active, but I am not going to be
the icon of the right-wing and the
administration."
Dolgon blamed CC for some
of the "distortion and hatred" in-
volved with campus politics. He
specifically criticized the CC
campaign posters that call for an
end to "anti-American rallies."
Members of the assembly had
mixed reactions to Dolgon's
resignation.
CC vice presidential candidate
Julie Davies said, "It came as a
great shock. He was a great
TUITION
Continued from page 1
state," Kennedy said.
Current tuition increases are be-
ing determined on the basis of a 4
percent increase in state funding.
However, the net increase to the
University will be a 3 percent in-
crease because of the 1 percent cut in
state funding the University was
forced to take this year.
Presidents from Lake Superior
State, Michigan State, Michigan

organizer. We (CC) respected him
as an opponent."
MSA President Jennifer Van
Valey described Dolgon as "one
of the hardest workers and most
committed people on the
assembly. I have the utmost
respect for Corey."
Some assembly members were
more critical of Dolgon's actions.
"His self-righteous posturing
was hypocritical," said Com-
munications Chair Brett White.
"He personally attacked Bill
Cosnowski and Aaron Williams
in the assembly and in the paper."
LSA rep. Jonathan Line dis-
agreed. "I wanted to commend
Corey for the stand he took
tonight. This is a great loss to
MSA."
Dolgon said he will continue
as chair of the Students' Rights
Commission until elections are
over and someone else can fill his
spot.
Tech, Eastern Michigan, and
Saginaw Valley also testified.
Kennedy said the other state in-
stitutions are facing similar budget
problems as the University. "There
is a considerable amount of consis-
tency in the way all of the institu-
tions appear to explain budget diffi-
culties and how they are trying to
deal with budgets this year."
Kennedy said the committee
scrutinized the universities' mone-
tary requests because it is concerned
with voter response to large tuition
hikes.
"The Committee is always in-
terested in in-state, undergraduate
tuition rates. This is the big issue
when they talk about holding down
tuition, and what their constituents
are interested in," Kennedy said.
Last year, the University in-
creased both in-state and out-of-
state tuition by 6.5 percent.
Associated Press Wire Reports
contributed to this article

Assembly
Attendance
T Following M~chigan Student Assmb
mmber s were present for openig ad
dosing roll call atlast nigit's meeting:
Matt Benson (Business)
Angela Burks (LSA)
Colleen Crossey (Soc Work)
Timothy Darr (Rackham)
Julie Davies (LSA)
Jeff Gauthier (Rackham)
James Green (LSA)
Jeff Hinte (Rackham)
Steven Kahl (Business)
Andrew Kanfer (Business)
Brian Kight (Engin)
Meagan Landers (LSA)
Johnathan Line (LSA)
Gregory Morrison (LSA)
Pedro Padilla (Lib Sci)
Jennifer Van Valey (LSA)
Hunter Van Valkenburgh (LSA)
Michael Warren (Law)
Kim Watson (LSA)
Brett White (LSA)
The following Michigan StudentAssembly
members were absent for either opening or
closing roll call at last night's meeting.
Mary Aitken (Nat Res)
Stephanie Andelman (LSA)
Amy Arnett (LSA)
Stefanie Brown (Nurs)
Melissa Burke (LSA)
Sreenivas Cherukuri (Engin)
Lynn Chia (LSA)
Paula Church (LSA)
Bill Cosnowski (Engin)
Rochelle Davis (Rackham)
Jennifer Dykema (LSA)
Joy Goldberg (LSA)
Brian Johnson (Engin)
Michael Kline (Rackham)
John Lapins (Architecture)
Mark LePage (Med)
Aberdeen Marsh (LSA)
Elizabeth Moldenhauer (Art)
Jonathan Naltjes (Music)
Paul Oppedisano (Pub Health)
Susan Richey (Pharmacy)
Lisa Schwartzman (LSA)
Elissa Silverman (LSA)
Christa Sinz (Education)
Jennifer Starrman (Engin)
Jonathan Uy (Med)

0

GEO
Cntinued from page 1
,ingrievance cases.
In addition to the proposal for a
vote on the work stoppage, the

union passed
for:

campus-wide pickets to be or-
ganized by representatives in each
department;
a rally in front of the Fleming

0
0

SAVE THE HUMAN RECORD
-i -4th Annual Library Preservation Awareness Week
March 25-29
Preservation Awareness Week is observed annually by the UM Library in order to help make
pdople more aware of the deterioration and damage that threaten our library collections. Al-
though we focus on the issue publicly for just one week, the protection, repair and conservation of
library materials is a year-round concern at the UM and libraries everywhere.
NOW SHOWING
THE DRAMA!
THE SUSPENSE!
See these starling videos exclusively at the locations listed below:
'Slow Fires" (33 minutes) demonstrates how acidic paper is affecting library collections
worldwide, threatening our cultural and intellectual heritage. Don't miss it!
Slow Fires can be seen:
Mon., March 25. north lobby of the Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Wed., March 27, Taubman Medical Library lobby, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Fri., March 29, south Lobby, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
'Murder in the Stacks" (14 minutes) The legendary Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson
find intrigue and suspense in the library. See how improper care and handling
of books can severely damage library col lectLions-- books you need!
Murder in the Stacks can be seen:
Mon-Fri. March 25-29, Art & Architecture Library. Continuously available for viewing.
Just ask at the circulation desk.
Mon., March 25, north lobby, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Tues. March 26, lobby, Undergraduate Library, 10- a.m.- p.m.
Thurs., March 28. south lobby, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
MAKING BOOKS THE OLD FASHIONED W.AY!
See trained professionals from the University Library's Conservation Unit demonstrate the fine
art of hand-sewing a book. Also on display will be samples of books in various stages of the
binding process. Demonstrations will be held:
Mon.. March 25. lobby. Undergraduate Library, 10 a.m.-Noon
Wed., March 27, north lobby. Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library 10 a.m.-moon
Thurs., March 28. reference room. Taubman Medical Library. 10 a.m.-Noon
Fri., March 29. lobby. North Campus Commons, II am.-I1 p.m.

LSA STUDENTS
It has come to the attention of the LS&A Curriculum Committee that some
final exams have been re-scheduled in previous semesters at times other
than those posted in the Time Schedule.
The Curriculum Committee viewsthis as a trendthatmay not be in your best
interests. Re-scheduling exams into earlier time periods may mean that
you will lose the final class period; it may mean thatyou are denied review
time in class; and it may rob you of study days. The committee wishes you
to know what the regulations are with regard to this practice and to know
your rights as students.
The Faculty Code says:
+, An instructor may not depart from the official schedule unless prior
approval of the Final Examination Committee is obtained.
All students are expected to take their final examinations at the time
fixed inthe official schedule of examinations.hNo single studentmay be
examined at a time earlier or later than the official time unless a
mutually agreeable time has been arranged in advance by the student
and the instructor.
Whether used for lecture orreview, the committee believes that ounhave
the right to have your final class periods and the complete assigned Study
Days-few as they are. If an instructor re-schedules an examination, you
have a right to take it at the scheduled time period.
If you experience any difficulty in this regard, please see
Assistant Dean Eugene Nissen (1402 Mason Hall; 764-7297) or
Mr. Alfred Stuart, University Registrar (1510 LSA; 764-6280).

M SA .E.C.NS.................
SITE HOURS OPEN
.DOW Librarmyo :1 p
U n i n :>: . . . . . . : 0":mt i9 ..
.Fihb .................8:5mto300p
......................5.p
Frieze 9:15 am tol12.30Pm
.Public Health 10:00 am to 2:40 pm
.Alice Lloyd...............5:15 pm to ".1. ..pm
East Quad !I:45am tol1:3Oprm
.:_r y4;5 mt asp-: pm
Grad.: Li bra ry ..7 0 pm to 9:30 pm
Philip CoherVDAILY GRAPHIC

SOVIET
Continued from page 1
Moscow rallies.
Yeltsin's demands for greater
autonomy for the Russian republic
have become a rallying point for
leaders in other republics.
The anti-Communist coalition
Democratic Russia denounced the
Soviet president's decree yesterday
that gives the Interior Ministry di-
rect control over the capital's police
force and increases his power to en-
force the ban. Democratic Russia
said it expects at least 500,000 peo-
ple to attend a rally scheduled to-
morrow.
The move also was bitterly op-
posed by the Moscow city govern-

ment, which is led by democratic re'
formists.
Vadim Bakatin, a member of
Gorbachev's National Security
Council, said "regular police mea
sures" would be used to enforce the
ban. Moscow Police Chief Pyotr
Bogdanov said extra officers would
be put on duty and more barricade$
erected, but he and Bakatin said no
tanks, armored personnel carriers or
tear gas would be used.
"Despite anything the Pavlov-
Gorbachev team might do ... the
rally and demonstration will take
place," organizer Lev Shemayev
told a news conference.
After receiving permits from the
Moscow City Council, Democratic
Russia also plans to picket around
the Kremlin tomorrow.

Lk.diga iaiIg
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
for two terms, $22 for one term. Campus delivery $28 for two terms. Prorated rates: Starting March 1,
1991, $11 for balance of term to 4/24/91.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the College Press Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336,
Circulation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550.

EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editors
Associate Editor
Weekend Editor
Associate Editor
Weekend Arts Editor
Photo Editors

Andrew Gottesman Sports Editor
Josh Milnick , Associate Editors
Philip Cohen, Christine
Kloostra, Donna Woodwell Arts Editors
Stephen Henderson, Dan Poux Books
Mike Fischer Film
Gil Renberg Fine Arts
Josephine Ballenger Music
Tony Silber Theater
Jose Juarez, Ken Smdller List Editor

Matt Rennie
Theodore Cox, Phil Green,
Jett Sheran, Dan Zoch
Mark Binell, Annette Petrusso
valerie Shuman
Brent Edwards
Elizabeth Lenhard
Peter Shapiro
Mary Beth Barber
Christine Iqoosira

0

News: Chris Afendulis, Lad Barager, Jami Blaauw, Marc ciagne, Lynne Cahn, Laura DePOmpolo, Brenda Diddinson, Jule
Foster, Jay Garcia, Henry Goldblall, Andrew Levy, Jeannie Luie, Shalni Patel, Melissa Peerless, Tami Plak, David Rheingold,
Bethany Robertson, Sarah Schweitzer, Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah, Jesse Snyder, Steanie Vines, Ken Walker, Garrick Wang.
Opinion: Russell Balimore, Brad Bernatek, Geoff Earle, David Leiner, Jenniler Mattson, Amitava Mazumdar, Brad Miller, Chris
Nordstrom, Manuel Olave, Charles Rousseau, Katie Sanders, Glynn Washington, Kevin Woodson.
Sports: Jason Bank, Chris Carr, Ken Davidoff, Andy DeKorte, Matfhew Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Dust, Jm Foss, Mke Gil,
Jason Gomberg, Ryan Herrington, David Hyman, Yoav Iron, David Kraft, Eric LemontAlbert Un, Rod Loewenhal, Adam Lutz,
Adam Miler, John Niyo, Mitch Rubenstein, David Schechter, Ryan Schreiber, Caryn Seidman, Rob Siegel, Eric Sklar, Tim
Spcar, Andy Stabile, Ken Sugiura, Kevin Sundman, Becky Weiss, Jeff Wiliams, Charlie Wel.
Arts: Greg Baise, Jen Bilik, Ilene Bush, Andrew J. Cahn, Beh Cokluit, Jenie Dahlmann, Richard S. Dadis, Michael Paul
Fischer, Gregg Flaxman, Diane Frieden, Forrest Green Il, Brian JarvinenJule Komnom, Mike Kuniavsky, David Lubliner, Mike
Molilor, Kristin Palm, Jon Rosenthal, Michael John Wilson, Justine Unatin, Kim Yaged.
Photo Brian Cantoni, Anhony M. Crll, Jennifer Dunez, Amy Feldman, Kim Garrett, Kristoffer Gilete, Michele Guy, Rob
Kroenert, Suzanne Paley.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan