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March 11, 1991 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-03-11

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Monday, March 11, 1991

BURKS'
Contiued from page 1
Election Director Tim Pope re-
sponded, "I am like a prosecuting at-

torney; I'm not a cop. She has to
give me something to prosecute. If a
racist incident occurs in regard to the
election and campaign then it is my
job to do something about it."

Burks said she thinks some peo-
ple do not want her to run based on
her race, "Some people are threatened
by the idea of a Black woman in
power."

Calvin and Hobbes
° a

by Bill Watterson

or *

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'..
.,.
9!
V
-...

Dooder State College

T K\ND of RESENT THE
MANU FACTURA IMRPL\c\1
ASSUMPTI0 MT T A\S
W00 AMUSE ME .
wa
3w,
by Alan Landau
SO WHEN ARE
WE LOOKING
FOR AN APART- LIKE I
TY? WAS SAYING:
STAN DARDS...
h~Ti /

"I'm not justifying it (forging the
signature) by bringing race into it,
I'm just being very honest about it."
Election Court Justice Pam Hud-
son said, "I don't think she felt the
election director was being racist. I
think she felt the board should be
concerned about larger issues."
Pope, who introduced the
charges, said race had nothing to do
with his reasoning for raising the is-
sue. "I highly resent the implication
that I don't care about racism be-
cause I took her to court," he said.
Troy agreed with Pope, "He is re-
quired to point out these discretions
to us."
Burks said Pope originally did
not intend to report the incident. "He
said, 'If you won't tell anybody
about it, I won't tell anybody about
it."'
Pope said he changed his mind
after he talked to her. "For me not to
report to the court what I consider
forgery would be dishonest," Pope
said. "I decided I didn't have the au-
thority to decide what is right or
wrong by myself, and because I rep-
resent the interests of 64
(candidates), I decided to report it."

COALITION
Continued from page 1
"I want to get MSA back to-
ward working on student con-
cerns," he added.
Other planned reforms involve
changing how MSA distributes
funds. "I'd like to work on a plan
with individual student govern-
ments whereby MSA mandates
that a majority of money that is
paid to MSA is returned to that
school," Green said. "A lot of the
schools that are not LSA do not
get the full benefits of MSA."
Green said most of the money
paid to MSA by schools within the
University are currently used to
fund the committees and commis-
sions within the assembly.
"A lot of them (committees and
commissions) pursue their own po-
litical agendas," he said.
Davies said one of her main
concerns was erasing the line that
has been drawn between CC
members and the liberal members
of MSA. "I think the line will al-
ways be drawn to a certain extent,

but when you see people laughing
about what other people say or
how they feel, that is complete
disrespect."
Davies said meetings could be
mediated in a manner conducive
to each party respecting the state-
ments of representatives of the
other.
Because many assembly mem-
bers feel a there is a communica-
tion problem between the student
government and the administra-
tion, Green believes this topic is
crucial to the election.
Green disapproves of the "new
regents" who dressed like the ad-
ministrators, interrupted the Uni-
versity Board of Regents meeting,
and took over the public comments
session at February's meeting.
Green said contacting alumni
about student concerns or starting
a petition would be a more effec-
tive method of communication.
"They (the regents) are not afraid
of some revolution that's going to
happen," he said. "We've been do-
ing that (staging protests) since
the sixties. They get deaf to it."

01

TY, SO WHAT DO YOv
.SAY? I EED A ROOMY.
LET ME GO LOOK FOR~ AN
APARTMENT WITH
YOU. HOW ABOUT IT?
20

I DON'T KNOW DAVE. I
LIKE YO, BUT I'VE GOT
STANDARDS.
" 1)

THERE ARE CERTAIN QUAL-
ITIES THAT MY ROOM-
MATE MU5T HAVE... HE
AT LEAST HAS TO BE NOR-
MAL! IT'S JUST NOT
HAPPENING.
-
FL Co

p

SEVILLE/MADRID
SUMMER 1991
Information Meeting
- for students accepted to, or
applying to the Summer Program
Thursday, March 14, 5:00 P.M.
4th Floor Commons-MLB

C C) I e -
The Michigan Daily is recruiting aggressive,
creative students for our Display Advertising
sales team! Great sales and advertising
experience! Both spring/summer and fall
positions are available.
Application deadline: Friday, March 15.
Student Publications Bldg
420 Maynard 9 764-0554

COMMON
Continued from page 1
Action party. Despite this, Com-
mon Snse's leaders insist their
party is not affiliated with Action.
"(Common Sense) is not Action
under a different name," Burks
said.
On the issue of student group
recognition, Common Sense sup-
ports automatic recognition, which
liberal members of MSA have re-
cently opposed because it would
allow for recognition of groups
many consider discriminatory or
offensive. Conservative Coalition
placed a strong emphasis on auto-
matic recognition in the fall elec-
tions.
Burks and Ochoa said Common
Sense is a diverse party which in-
cludes many women and people of
color all having their own views.
The party's platform includes
the following:
Students Rights. Common

Sense advocates a combination of
negotiating with University admin-
istrators and mobilized activism.
Environmental Concerns.
The party wants to continue to
work for increased recycling and
banning the use, of Styrofoam.
They are also opposed to nuclear
waste dumps anywhere on the
University campus.
People of Color Issues.
Helping people of color shape their
own reality is a major part of
Common Sense, Burks said.
Common Sense does not believe
the University is serious in their ef-
forts at retaining and integrating
people of color in the University
community.
North Campus Agenda.
"More resources should be avail-
able on North campus," Burks
said. Common Sense believes

S

North campus students
disadvantage because
considered part of a
community.

are at a
they are
separate

I

--

I

Want to Know Where
Your Liberal Arts Degree
Can Lead?
Your bachelor's degree, combined with a Master's from the Annenberg School
for Communication, can take you into a management career in mass media,
telecommunications, public policy, corporate communication, and more.
Here's what some recent graduates of Annenberg's M.A. program are doing:

PARKING
Continued from page 1
"If you really want it, you'll
camp out and get it," he said.
Mahida said he didn't mind pay-
ing the money to get a spot but was
disappointed when he realized it was
in an uncovered and unpaved lot.
Because of the demand for park-
ing spaces, students have a history

of trying to devise clever schemes to
beat the system.
"Unfortunately students have a
bad reputation for cheating," DeWolf
said. "Enforcement officers are very
good at catching them. You'd be
surprised how many people we do
catch."
Even University employees have
been dismissed for using fraudulent
parking permits, she added.

Paramount Pictures
Vice-President, TV Programming
Walt Disney Co.
Analyst, International TV Marketing
MGM/UA
Director, European Sales & Marketing
International Home Video
J. Walter Thompson
Sr. Account Executive
Price Waterhouse
Senior Telecommunications Consultant
Abbeville Press
New Projects Editor
Warner Bros. Records
Coordinator, International Publicity
Black Entertainment Television
Director of Operations and
Business Development

Goldman, Sachs & Co.
Senior Telecommunications Analyst
The Learning Channel
Vice President,
Affiliate Sales & Marketing
National Cable TV Association
Director, State & Local
Regulatory Issues
Tribune Broadcasting
Strategic Planning Analyst
Pacific Telesis
Director, Strategic Analysis-
Federal Communications Commission
Analyst, Legal Affairs
Capital Cities/ABC
Research Manager
American Diabetes Association
Public Affairs Director

GEO
Continued from page 1
It didn't affect negotiations at all,"
she said.
Dolan-Greene refused to comment
on GEO's settlement package.
GEO bargainers presented a two-
year settlement package to the Uni-
versity calling for a 12 percent raise
in 1991-92 and a 9 percent raise in
1992-93.
However, the University has
stood firm on their three-year eco-
nomic package which called for a 3.5
percent raises in the next two years
and an additional 5 percent raise in
1993-94.
The TA union says a two-year
contract would allow them to rene-
gotiate more often and better ac-
commodate a high turnover rate of
TAs.
The rally culminated in speeches
given by GEO supporters on the
LSA building steps before the nego-
tiation session.

"This University is here to teach
people and we are at the center of the
University's mission," Zundel said
to the crowd. "We do not deserve the
kind of treatment we are getting."
"Are you gonna stand up for your
rights?" he asked.
GEO supporters vowed to take
their fight for a new contract beyond
the negotiation table.
"We're no longer playing by their
rules anymore. We are taking the
fight out of courts and into the
streets," said GEO organizer Howard
Street.
Undergraduates also voiced sup-
port for GEO.
"When TAs are subjugated to the
point where they are teaching classes
with 30 students, the undergraduates
are getting a bad deal along with the
graduate students," LSA junior Todd
Ochoa said.
A GEO strike committee said
they would hold an informational
picket this Friday. The next round of
negotiations is set for Wednesday.

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
for two terms, $22 for one term. Campus delivery $28 for two terms. Prorated rates: Starting March 1,
1991, $11 for balance of term to 4/24/91.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the College Press Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336,
Circulation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550.

Your graduate education at the Annenberg School, USC, includes a choice among 30 seminars in
communications management. Here are some offerings that serve different career interests:
Law and Public Policy; International Communications; Communications
Technologies; Diffusion of Innovations; Communication in Organizations;
Business Strategies of Communication Industries; Media in Social Services;
Arts and the New Media; Communication Research; Economics of Communication.
Scores of other courses throughout the University can also be used in completing your seven-course
program.
Los Angeles is a world capital of communications; Annenberg's Career Development Office helps
you get internships for on-the-job learning. Supervised internships are also available in Washington,
D.C. Extensive alumni network works in behalf of graduates.
Please send me more information.

EITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editors
Associate Editor
Weekend Editor
Associate Editor
Weekend Arts Editor
Photo Editors

Andrew Gottesman Sports Editor
Josh Mitnick Associate Editors
Philp Cohen, Christine
Kloostra, Dona Woodwell Arts Editers
Stephen Henderson, Dan Poux Books
Mike Fischer Film
Gil Renberg Fine Arts
Josephie Ballenger Music
Tony Silber Thete
Jose Juarez, Ken Smcier List Editor

Matt Rennie
Theodore Cox, Phil Green,
Jeff Sherari, Dan Zoch
Mark Bineli, Anuette Pebusso
valerie Shuman
Brent Edwards
Elzabeth Lenhard
Peter Shiro
Mary Beth Barber
Christine Iloostra

News: Chris Afendulis, Lari Barager, Jami Blaauw, Marc Ciagne, Lynne Cohn, Lau aDePompolo, BrendaDickinson, Juie
Foster, Jay Garcia, Henry Goldblatt, Shalini Patel, Melissa Peerless, Tami Pollak, David Rheingold, Bethany Robertson, Sarah
Schweitzer, Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah, Jesse Snyder, Stefanie Vines, Ken Walker, Garrick Wang.
Opinion: Russell Baltmore, Brad Bernatek, Geoff Earle, David Leilner, Jennifer Mattson, Amitava Mazumdar, Brad Miller, Chris
Nordstrom, Manuel Olave, Charles Rousseau, Katie Sanders, Glynn Washington, Kevin Woodson.
Sports: Jason Bank, Chris Carr, Ken Davidoff, Andy DeKorte, Matthew Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Jim Foss, Mike Gill,
Jason Goniberg, Ryan Herrington, David Hymnr, Yoav Irom, David Kraft Erc Lemont, Albert Lin, Rod Loswenthal, Adam Lutz,
Adam Mler, John Nyo, Mitch Rubenstein, David Schechter, Ryan Schreiber, Caryn Seidman, Rob Siegel, Eric Sklar, Tim
Spolar, Andy Stabile, Ken Sugiura, Kevin Sundman, Becky Weiss, Jeff Williams, Charlie WdWfe
Arts: Greg Baise, Jon Bilik, liene Bush, Andrew J. Cahn, Beth Colquit, Jenie Dahlmann, Richard S. Davis, Michael Paul
Fischer, Gregg Flaxman, Diane Frieden, Forrest Green Ill, Brian Jarvinen, Mike Kolody, Julie Komon, Mike Kuniavsky, David
Lubliner, Mike Molitor, Kristin Palm, Jon Rosenthal, Michael John Wison, Kim Yaged.
Photo: Brian Cantoni, Anthony M. Crdl, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Kim Garret, Kristoffer Gilette, Michelle Guy, Rob
Kroonert, Suzanne Paley.
Weekend: Jonatha~,n Cha2it Scott Ch,,ra k. oh Fnkel. LI rv Hu.WErca Ko hnk. Eric Le monAam Lvn e. C ra,,i ineJs

01

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