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February 22, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-22

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, February 22, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson STUDENTS

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By Alan Landau
WHfAT, YOU DON'T THINK
I CARE AAOuT THE INTEC-
RITY OF OUR SC.HOOL?
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Continued from page 1
men's outreach coordinator, be-
lieves men need to take responsi-
bility for their actions, Bowef be-
lieves rape is not just a man's
problem.
"I don't think you should make
it just men. Men and women can
help stop it together," he said. "It's
a definite problem and both groups
have to work together to help solve
the problem."
Sexism works in both direc-
tions, Bowef added. "It isn't just
males to females. It's also females
to males, and I've experienced
that here," he said.
He told a story about when a
woman who was offended when he
opened a door for her. "I think
that's sexism. I was just being
nice," he said.
Bowef said he probably would
not use Safewalk unless he had to
walk a long distance late at night.
He added he usually walked with a
group of people. "Even if they can
defend themselves - guy or girl
- they should walk with some-
one," he said.

Safewalk representatives re-
ported that men rarely use the ser-
vice. "The overwhelming majority
(of walkees) are women. That
might be why guys don't use it -
the whole idea of machismo or I
don't need that," said Safewalk
co-coordinator Leah Niederstadt.
A reluctance to use Safewalk is
not confined to men, however.
LSA Senior Kelly Hagan said
Safewalk did not operate in the ar-
eas she needed to walk. "I kind of
have to walk alone a lot in the
night and the morning. The places
I walk are usually work or class,"
she said. "I have to admit I'd feel
stupid using Safewalk all the time.
And I'm usually careful."
Other students argue it is the at-
titude that "it only happens to
someone else" which serves to
perpetuate the problem of rape.
"There's so many of us that say
it's not going to happen to me,"
said School of Natural Resources
sophomore Jennifer Talagrand.
Students can receive rape
counseling from SAPAC, which
gets 400 calls a year on the crisis
hotline, in addition to walk-ins.
In an open letter last semester,
University President James Duder-
stadt said the University is taking
steps to improve safety on campus,
including improving lighting and
adding more emergency phones.

"They keep saying they're go-
ing to improve the lighting and put
in halo phones, but I haven't seen
any changes," said LSA Sopho-
more Lesli Preuss, who believes
the University should still increase
campus lighting.
"You can't have them (lights
everywhere, but there are some ar-
eas where they could probably use
them," she continued.
University officials said action
has already been taken.
"I don't know where they get
the idea that we haven't been im-
proving the light - the whole
Diag is lit up like a Christmas
tree," said Harrison. "We've spent
an awful lot of time and money orI
improving lighting and emergency
phones. Our intent is to install as
much lighting as possible and
make the University as safe as
possible."

Despite the progress
the University, many
women still live in fear.

made by
campus

ROTC

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Continued from page 1
Many major colleges and uni-
versities responded to anti-mili-
tarism by dismissing their ROTC
programs from campus. Sixteen
Republican members of Congress
proposed the virtual removal of the
program from college campuses to
cool student anti-militarism and
salvage the program. Enrollment in
ROTC was at its lowest since
World War II. The future of ROTC
was in doubt.
As anti-militarism faded with
the end of the war, many colleges
invited ROTC back to campus and
it has since reemerged as the mili-
tary's primary source of officer
recruitment.
The question remains whether
the Plexiglass windows will again
be needed to serve their original
purpose.
Gregor said the war has had lit-
tle influence on the University's
ROTC program. There are no visi-
ble signs of a decrease in enroll-
ment or interest in the program, he
said.
"It certainly hasn't hurt any-
thing. There has been no negative
effect," he said.
Brian Parillo, a senior cadet
from Rochester, N.Y., said he has
not experienced any harassment
from other students while wearing
his uniform. "I get more people
that shake my hand while I'm
walking down the street," he said.
Parillo said he does not antici-
pate any militant acts against
ROTC like those during the Viet-

"So many of my friends have
been raped. It's not just a mino*
problem that a few individuals
have. Every woman on this campus
has been afraid at one time - do-
ing normal things," Kane said.
"People structure their lives
around this fear. That's sad. It
shouldn't have to be that way."
nam War because of a change in
student mentality at the University.
"Most of the campus doesn'*
really care," he said. "I find it hard
to believe that ROTC could be
kicked off campus. I think the
campus is too conservative now for
things like that to happen."
Students Against U.S. Interven-
tion in the Gulf (SAUSI) has not
taken an official stance on the is-
sue of military units on campus,
but they have made a commitment
to non-violence, -said Daniel
Kohns, publicity chair for the anti-
war group.
"We are uncomfortable about
military units being on campus,
but we realize some of the stu-
dents who join ROTC do so be-
cause of student loans. We don't
want to attack students trying to,
get an education," Kohns said.
"If and when we do confront*
(ROTC), it will be on different
terms than during Vietnam," added
Kohns, who said he was not aware
of the January incident.
Although SAUSI does not ad-
vocate violence in its anti-war ac-
tivities, Kohns didn't rule out the
possibility of a more militant indi-
vidual or group taking violent ac-
tion. He alluded to recent incidents
of two demonstrators burning*
themselves to death as examples
of more drastic acts of protesting
the war taken by people around the
country.
"People will become enraged
when their brother, sister, wife or
husband come home dead. People
will become more militant. What
form. that will take is yet to be de-
termined," Kohns said.

IRAQ
Continued from page 1
points the leaders discussed.
"President Bush said the United
States would consult with its coali-
tion partners on the proposal,"
Fitzwater said.
The plan outlined by Ignatenko
did not include any mention of link-
age to an Israeli withdrawal from oc-
cupied Arab territories, one of the
sticking points in all previous peace

discussions.
However, a knowledgeable U.S.
official, speaking on condition of
anonymity, said he foresaw prob-
lems because the plan does not ac-
count for reparations by Iraq to
Kuwait.
"That, essentially, would be let-
ting them get away with it," the of-
ficial said.

Sbe fidrigan i4ailt
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a

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