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February 21, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-21

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, February 21, 1991

WAR
Continued from page 1
tunity." House Speaker Thomas
Foley said that if the withdrawal is
unconditional, "I don't know how

(President Bush) could fail to ac-
cept it."
Bush kept a public silence on
the issue yesterday, a day after de-
scribing the plan as "well short" of
U.S. requirements.

Desert Storm commander Gen.
H. Schwarzkopf said the Iraqi army
was "on the verge of collapse."
Other senior U.S. officers added
that they still expected a bloody
fight.

a

Calvin pad Hobbes

M { ESSAII VS ENTITLED,
" AFTER SNOOD AT MY
47

" ITs MOT 1T I I ND
BEING C4MMED IN THE
BASEMENT, I~sJUST T'MAM
W4E9 WE MEAT" tS TNIWK
D WNTE R~ S AVE N1E
ADVANTGE OF RKES
AND THE,~

WWK MTISS

by Bill Watterson
ANORPARENT-(tEACuER
_CONFERENCE . .
T-W E 1 R

I .

By Alan Landau

77ti

EXPERIMENT
Continued from page 1
The consent form also called
for three meals on the day of the
experiment. Hemminger said that
she did not receive lunch. When
she explained that she was too
sick to eat her dinner, she said Dr.
Lucia Jim, the advising pharma-
cist, offered to eat the meal for
her.
The consent form also said that
if the subject's blood pressure
dropped below 80/50 the experi-
ment could be terminated. At one
point in the experiment, records
show that Hemminger's blood
pressure was 40/unknown. The ex-
periment was not terminated early.
At this point in the experiment,
Hemminger said she distinctly re-
calls hearing a woman, who identi-
fied herself as the head nurse of
the unit, request that the experi-
ment be terminated.
The consent form also said that
the University would provide first
aid medical treatment in the event
of physical injury resulting from
NORML
Continued from page 1
Ann Arbor Deputy Police Chief
Donald Johnson. "Of course this
year it is a civil infraction just for
possession. It has not been a major
problem in the past few years. There

research procedures.
Hemminger claimed she was
still dizzy the next morning, and
as she walked from the kitchen to
the bathroom, she fainted, fell and
hit her head. She said she was un-
conscious for 11 and a half hours.
The doctors insisted it was a
natural reaction and declined to
see her, she added.
Dr. James O'Dennell, a phar-
macologist and consultant, said in
Hemminger's medical case history
that her fall was clonidine in-
duced, and caused the traumatic
injury.
He added that Hemminger
should not have participated in the
second day of the study.
Dr. Jack Radomski, also a
pharmacologist and consultant,
said that he did not feel that
Hemminger was properly cared for
by the hospital's staff. He added
that fear of possible legal compli-
cations undoubtedly biased their
medical judgement toward mini-
mizing the problem.
Hemminger said she has sought
medical attention many times, but

most doctors refuse treatment
when they discover that her injury
is an indirect result of a University
experiment. She said the doctors
claim they will lose doctor refer-
rals if they treat her.
A mediative council of three
Washtenaw County lawyers rec-
ommended a settlement *
$320,000, which Hemminger de-
scribed as a pitiful amount.
But Hemminger's lawyers are
recommending a settlement of ap-
proximately $2.5 million.
Hemminger believs her case is
important because it involves test-
ing new drugs that will be given to
unsuspecting patients.
Hemminger stressed the nee
for a fair and favorable outcomeW
She said that when she first filed
suit she was told that "no one wins
a case filed against the University
of Michigan Hospital in Washte-
naw County."
Goldman said that in the past
10 years, about 90 percent of the
cases which have gone all the way
through the court system have
been found in favor of tho
University.

Dooder State College

I CAN'T BELIEVE NoU
BUILT A WEAPON
PROFESSOR KENJLEV.
-("
1.-,
\ S

THE X-jqicIMOLE~CU.LAR
PARTIC.LL DEATHSEAM
HAS NO PRAC.TICAL
MILITAR~Y APPLICATIONS,
DAVE.
d- '

THAN WHY( Do Yov
CALL IT A DEATHt3E.AM?I
\ . r

HOW MANY( TIMES DO
I HAVE TO TELL YOU?
ALL OF MY AE5EARCH
INVOLVES SAFETY IN
THE WORKPLACEA

has been more drinking than (use of)
marijuana."
NORML members do not expect
a problem during the upcoming
Hemp Tour and Hash Bash.
"We changed it from April 1, the
day of city elections, to April 6,"
Birkett said. "Also, we won in court

last year, when the University
granted us a permit and then revoked
it."
Libertarian mayoral candidate
David Raaflaub joined the meeting
to advocate legalization of hemp and
gain support from NORML.

9111L

m

w

I

ABORTION
Continued from page 1
to do," Houbeck added. "But it's
too bad we have to. There's so
many other things we want to do."
Campus pro-life activists echo
this belief. "We'll do all we can to
help turn it back. We, of course,
are against it because we believe
that abortion is wrong," said Stu-
dents for Life Officer Susan
Derengoski. "That is not a way to
help poor people - killing their
children."

NOW HIRING
FOR OUR NEW PLYMOUTH ROAD STORE
FOR THESE PART-TIME POSITIONS:
CLERK/CASHIERS PRODUCE CLERKS
STOCK CLERKS DELI/PASTRY CLERK
SOME OF THE ADVANTAGES OFFERED
" STARTING RATE $5.50/HOUR
" FLEXIBLE WORK SCHEDULES
" PAID TIME OFF (VACATIONS, HOLIDAYS)
" HOME STUDY/EDUCATIONAL REIMBURSEMENT
PROGRAMS
OTHER POSITIONS AT COMPETITIVE STARTING RATES
ALSO AVAILABLE.
APPLICATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED AT
2641 PLYMOUTH RD., (at NIXON RD.)
TUESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F

The Feminist Majority. "Anything
that stops a woman from exercis-
ing her right to choose is totally
wrong in our opinion and leads to
back-alley abortions."
Pro-choicers believe restricting
abortion causes death and say they
will continue to fight the Michigan
parental consent law. "As soon as
one young girl dies, that's empiri-
cal proof the law doesn't work. In
fact it's very dangerous," Marx
said.
Yorkin said, "There are a num-
ber of reasons why young women
should not have to tell their par-
ents," including incest or the
threat of abuse.
In addition to the Michigan rul-
ing, recent decisions in Maryland
and Oregon have bolstered the Roe
v. Wade Supreme Court decision
and pro-choice movement.

Pro-lifers claim 10,000
tions have been prevented
the law was implemented.

abor-
since

Pro-choicers disagree. The law
"means that poor women can't get
an abortion. The ones who suffer
are the people who need Medi-
caid," said Peg Yorkin, chair of

I

Food Buys

'I

TUITION
Continued from page 1
UC system President David Gard-
ner said, "It has been hard, not
easy, to decide among painful al-
ternatives. We are forced to make
cuts and hike tuition. It's not our
choice."
In justifying the state's decision
to reduce education funding,
Wilson said it was necessary to
make the cuts now before the state
deficit is allowed to worsen.
"It's castor oil now or
chemotherapy later," he said in a
press release.
UCLA first-year-student Heather
Vaicek said, "I think it's pretty bad
because I'm paying out-of-state-
tuition. It's already gone up once
this year and now it's going up
MEN
Continued from page 1
On the other hand, since the
MSG concentrates on examining
personal consequences to an indi-
vidual's thoughts and actions, the
issues discussed vary for each man
in the group. Topics include men's
roles in society, men and viol-
ence, homophobia, and men and
sexuality.
"The Men's Support Group is
designed to be a safe place for
men to work on their own issues
around sexism," Whalen said.
Members of the group may be
survivors of rape themselves, but
are not forced to disclose personal
experiences. "There's no way we
would know that unless they dis-
cussed that themselves," Whalen
said. FBI statistics show that one
in 10 men is raped during his life.
There are two groups of men
within the MSG. The introductory
group ranges from four to eight
men, while the advanced group1
contains 12 to 18 men.I
In the past, men's action

again next year. Students should not
have to pay the university's debts."
In addition to increasing tuition,
the UC system will also make
drastic cuts in personnel and pro-
gramming after state funding is
decreased.
Included in these cuts:
the moving of remedia
mathematics and English classe
from UC schools to area community
colleges;
a delay in the construction of a
new UC campus in the San Joaquin
Valley, and;
a five percent reduction in the
number of faculty and staff
members.
The cuts will eliminate abouO
1,000 jobs.
against rape has taken various
forms. The male constituents of
SAPAC have participated in the
men's portion of the annual Take
Back the Night program and in a
signature drive to help stop rape.
Participants in the Take Bacla
the Night Men's Rally last year is-
sued 14 demands. The demands
included pledging to support ev-
eryone who has suffered from male
violence, re-evaluating stereotypi-
cal male and female behaviors
with a goal of equality, mandating
the University use inclusive lan-
guage, and an end to rape, vio-
lence, harassment of women, and
discrimination.
Because Whalen began his po
sition as Men's Outreach Coordi-
nator Feb. 1, he plans to become
accustomed to the job before mak-
ing any changes.
But he believes men's efforts
against rape have evolved. "I think
the agendas of each program are@
becoming refined and we're get-
ting better and better at getting at
the heart of the issues," he said.

-IWZLM

"
SC'
DON
" we
" shy
" an?
" sit<
DO:
" tak
" wo
" ass
* wor
" ma
" fac
" per
phy
" inte
ENJC
" wor
" acti
" taki

ILUMBERGER FIELD
NGINEERS
I'T:
ar suits and ties
uffle papers
swer phones all day
at a desk
e charge
rk long hours
ume heavy responsibility
rk outdoors
ike decisions
e many challenges and risks
form data acquisitions and measurements of
ysical properties of subsurface formations
rpret that information
'king with a great deal of autonomy
ng on an idea and risk carrying it to fruition
ng pride in a job well done
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
(and other engineering disciplines)
GEOSCIENCES
APPLIED SCIENCES
RMATION MEETING:
March 14, 1991
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
G. Brown, Room 1504
RVIEWING:
March 15, 1991;
Please check with Placement Office
NOTE: Open to aN i sftesd sx nts. lur atendance at
rne**an Mieeting is a pr& ~t our #naM vhV rg oom
Eea. Casual aftsl
Exceptional People.
Exceptional Technology.
Worldwide,
An Equal Opportunity Employer
I b

rrnmm
"We shix
Mrs. Pea
7151
I6mmmm

COOKIES
ANN ARBOR'S
#1 COOKIE
p cookies and gift tins any
in the continental U.S.!"
body's... where you can alway
cookie baked with love

mmmmmq
,
ywhere ,
s get a
HIP
AAAI
..... id

N. UNIVERSITY

761-C
(IA(

!m-mm m---mm-mm

SumriI~i
Hoasin

0
New
York
city

v

INFO
Date:
Time:
Place:
INTE
Date:
Place:
PLEASE
Plesea

Will you be working, doing an internship,
or enjoying a summer in New York? You can
live in the heart of Greenwich Village as an
NYU Associate or take a course in our exciting
summer sessions if you wish.
" Minutes from New York's business and
cultural centers
e Apartment-style and traditional residences;
single and double occupancy
" Outstanding sports-recreation facility
" Includes the New York Experience, an
enjoyable noncredit program exploring
careers and culture in New York City

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