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February 19, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-19

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, February 19, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson ARTS

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YOUWLL NEVER GUESS
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W EA AN
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By Alan Landau
SAMESON, THIS T YES, BUT,
BEAM WILL REV DID YOV SAY
OLUTIONIZE THE THE GRAWT
ART OF WARFARE! WAS FOR?
1

Continued from page 1
the African-American print sale in
the Union last week. Boles, an
LSA senior, said if state art fund-
ing is cut, Black artists will also
have problems finding funding for
their work.
"It will make the output of the
art slow down. You may have a
harder time trying to find good
quality Black art," Boles said.
Educational programs are also
likely to suffer if art organizations
are forced to make cutbacks. The
University Musical Society, the
Ann Arbor Hands on Museum, and
the Ann Arbor Symphony are a few
of the organizations that sponsor
outreach programs for community

members.
"I'm worried if public schools
and the state slash and cut arts
budgets, it could mean these
youngsters are deprived of the spe-
cial opportunity the exposure to
music and dance can mean," said
Ken Fischer, executive director of
the University Musical Society.
In the past, Fischer said the
musical society has used state
funds to support public interest
programs, like the Youth Opera
Program.
"That way, Mom and Pop pay-
ing taxes are really able to under-
write the cultural development of
their youngsters," he said. Fischer
said the musical society will re-
main committed to its youth pro-
grams, but that new funding

I AM GOING TO
BE AN A6I5-
TANT TO PRO-
FE5SOR KENLEV !

GREAT...

COME ON! THis i5LIKE
A DREAM COME TRUE.
! CAN ONLY MAGINE THE
WONDERFVL THINGS WE'LL
DO FOR MANKIND!
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SOVIET PLAN
Continued from page 1
tionary Command Council, Ig-
natenko said.

He called the proposal "a con-
crete plan for settlement in the
Persian Gulf through political
means." He also said it was "fully
in line with the Soviet position

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that there should be an uncondi-
tional withdrawal from Kuwait."
Citing unidentified Soviet
sources, the German newspaper
Bild said the plan demands Iraq's
unconditional withdrawal from
Kuwait and would bar any punitive
actions against Saddam. The plan
also calls for negotiations on the
Palestinian problem, and declares
that Iraq's government would re-
main intact, the newspaper said.
.r.

SAPAC
Continued from page 1
trained 30 students to lead Ac-
quaintance Rape Prevention
Workshops in University housing
and English Composition classes.
By the end of the 1986 fall
semester, more than 800 students
had participated in these work-
shops. But in the 1989-1990 aca-
demic year alone, SAPAC Peer
Educators presented workshops to
more than 3000 people.
"They're (the workshops) re-
ally well-known across the coun-
try," Steiner said.
Currently there are 40 SAPAC
peer educators - twenty people
of each sex. This was the first
year SAPAC was forced to turn
away men for this position.
Counseling is necessary to
maintain an effective sexual as-
sault program, Steiner argued.
"We were overrun with women
coming in saying 'that happened
to me, now what do I do?' It's ir-
responsible to do rape prevention
and awareness and then leave
people dangling without support,"
she said.
In order to set up a campus
rape crisis service, the funding for
SAPAC increased to $130,000.
The crisis line was eventually im-
plemented in October, 1988.

SAPAC now receives nearly
400 calls a year.
Due to funding shortages, how-
ever, crisis line hours have been
reduced from 24-hour service. The
crisis line now operates from 5
p.m. to 9 a.m. weekdays and 24
hours on weekends. When the cri-
sis line is not in operation, the
SAPAC office is open.
FBI statistics state only 10
percent of rapes are reported to
the police, making rape the most
underreported crime in the coun-
try. One in eight college women
is raped. Of the rapes which occur
on college campuses, over 90
percent of the victims knew the
assailant, a 1986 survey stated.
Rapes remain unreported be-
cause victims feel people will not
believe them and no one will do
anything to help them, Steiner
said.
There has been a significant
rise in the number of rapes re-
ported to SAPAC, however. In
1983 three rapes were reported in
the community. SAPAC received
reports of 14 rapes in 1986, 42 in
1987, 84 in 1988, and over 100 in
1989.
The number of rapes has given
the University the reputation of
having the highest number of
campus rapes nationwide. But
Steiner is quick to point out this

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Spread your horizons. Live and
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Meet advisors from London,
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February 19th, at 3:30 pm in the
Michigan Union Pendleton Room,
or contact Bill of Jeannine on
(313) 764-9310.

sources will have to be found.
Some community members felt
the switch from state-funded to
community-funded art program-
ming was logical considering the
rest of the state's economy.
"If (art organizations) ar*
forced to close, it will be because
people don't care about them,"
said Barb Jakary of Detroit. "I
think that money should be spent
for children's programs before art."
First-year LSA student Erin
Lamarca supported Engler's pro-
posals, saying she did not believe
in state-supported arts. "I think if
it's a worthy art and the commu-
nity wants it, it will be supported,"
Lamarca said.
simply means the University is
increasing the number of survivors
who come forward, whereas other
universities are not.
"It's very, very clear to me
that it doesn't mean that we have
more rapes. We have successfully*
created an atmosphere for rape
survivors," she said. "But that
doesn't mean the college doesn't.
have rapes or that Michigan has
more rapes happening. People are
really misled by statistics."
There has also been a subtle
change in campus atmosphere,
Steiner commented. In the past,
SAPAC received numerous com-
plaints about offensive fraternity*
posters during a contest recogniz-
ing sexism in advertising.
"Only one of the things sub-
mitted last year was a fraternity
rush poster. They've really
cleaned up their act. It shows how
the climate doesn't tolerate it
(rape) anymore," Steiner said.
For the future, SAPAC wants
to concentrate more on reaching
students of color, men, and Urni
versity staff.
SAPAC also wants to work
more with the Greek system.
Steiner said,"They have a higher
proportion of rape than the gen-
eral student population. They're
concerned - it's a hard issue for
them to address.
on this campus - they're so
energetic."
Conversely, her energy is the
first image Steiner's name evokes
for students who know her.
Northwalk Co-coordinator
Robert Tyson described her posi-
tive energy and perpetual smile.
"She's always got a very ener-
getic attitude even in simple
things like how she greets you,"
he said.
LSA senior Nicole Carson,
Safewalk's coordinator for the
1989-90 academic year, also em-
phasized Steiner's energy despite
the draining nature of sexual as-
sault issues.
Carson said her experiences
with Steiner were not always
smooth, however. "We had our
discussions and disagreements,
but that's pretty typical with me
with anybody," she said.
"She's very determined and
outspoken. I respect that she will
stand up for herself," Carson said.
"She really cares about people's
well-being. She's done a lot in her
life."
Despite past success, Steiner's
appetite for social change re-

mains unsatiated and her quest
continues. Reflecting the current
situation in the Persian Gulf, she
wears a button boldly proclaiming
"Stop the War."

_ __ _ 1 .t

I -

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Want to Know Where.
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Here's what some recent graduates of Annenberg's M.A. program are doing:
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STEINER
Continued from page 1
more exposed to world issues
while working for the ACLU. "It
was wonderful. It was wild," she
said. "That was back in 1980. The
kind of things we had to face
were more fundamental, more ba-
sic - police brutality, prayer in
school - not just moment of si-
lence, but .teachers leading the
class."
Did Steiner succeed in her ef-
forts to incur social change? "You
learn that success is measured in
many different ways," she said.
"We had a lot of successes, but a
lot of disappointments too. Social
change is a slow process."
Delighted by the student ac-
tivism which formed SAPAC,
Steiner works at the U. for social
change. "The thing that excited
and interested me in the job was
that students had gotten it started.
It's better that the students on
campus had decided this (is a key
issue) than the administration."
Since change has to start with
young people, the activism on
campus is heartening, Steiner ex-
plained. "Just as much as I get
tired, there's a lot to get you back
up again," she said. "I'm so in-
spired to work with the students

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