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February 18, 1991 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-18

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The Michigan Daily-Monday, February 18, 1991 - Page 3

WCBN kicks off
'vital' fundraiser e

Students turn
old eyeglasses
into new vision

by Jenny Adler
"We've got everything!"
claims WCBN Production Direc-
tor and Fundraiser Coordinator
Brian Wells.
"We are a free-form station,"
Wells said. "We run the gamut.
,We have Public Affairs shows
every evening including shows
on Middle East perspectives and
Women's Issues. Our music
ranges from early blues to the
latest house music. We also play
classical music, folk music,
country music, and modern mu-
sic. We have movies on record.
We've got just about everything
for everyone."
How is a student-run radio
station located in the basement
of the Student Activities
Building (SAB) capable of
offering so much to University
and Washtenaw County
listeners? Simple. They have
their annual fundraiser.
This week, WCBN radio sta-
tion began its 12th annual
fundraiser, which Wells calls
"absolutely vital."
The fundraiser began Monday
and continued through midnight
yesterday.
. Wells said, "We need as
much as we can get. Last year's
fundraiser raised approximately

$18,000. We are hoping to make
as much or more this year. Right
now we are $1,000 ahead of
where wewere last year. How-
ever, all that really matters is
that we earn enough just to get
by. The support of the commu-
nity and the students is what we
appreciate."
Wells said Sunday afternoon
he thought the station would
reach its goal of $20,000 .
The University Board of Re-
gents allocates $14,000 a year
for the station, but that barely
covers just under half of
WCBN's budget. As a result, the
fundraiser is extremely impor-
tant.
"We have about 90 people
working for the station and not
one cent goes in their pockets,"
Wells said. "The money that we
earn goes to maintenance,
equipment, publicity, and our
programs. We cannot continue
without this fundraiser."
WCBN exists for students
to learn to run a radio station, as
well as for the listener, provid-
ing a wide range of programs,
Wells said. "We emphasize a
unique service for the commu-
nity and students and we need
all the help we can get," he
said.

by Julie Schupper
Your used eyeglasses could be
used to open hopeful eyes in a lit-
tle town in Mexico, Nicaragua,
Equador, or Jamaica.
The American Medical Associ-
ation's Medical Student Section
(AMA*MSS) is collecting used
eyeglasses, frames, and cases for
distribution in underdeveloped
countries. The AMA, in conjunc-
tion with the Medical Group Mis-
sions (MGM), is helping hundreds
of thousands of people overseas
enjoy facets of life that were pre-
viously unavailable to them.
Michael Paterson, a second-
year medical student, began the
drive in Ann Arbor and is enthusi-
astic about its possibilities.
"The glasses are sent to a
warehouse in Florida where they
are sorted out by prescriptions," he
said. From there, the glasses are
shipped to the MGM headquarters
in the Dominican Republic.
Paterson said MGM also sends
doctors to insure correct prescrip-
tions are given out. He said it is
fairly common for doctors in the

United States and Canada to vol-
unteer a couple of weeks overseas;
These ophthalmolo fists and op.
tometrists travel at eir own ex-
pense to diagnose the patients.
'It is worth all the
effort to be able to
share the joy of
restored sight'
-MGM voluntee,
"It is worth all the effort to be
able to share the joy of rest&ed
,sight," a volunteer said. "But after
two short weeks working together'
with the people, we are the ones
who receive new vision."
Two collection sites have been
set up to boost the Eyeglass Drive
this year. Boxes can be found in
the basement of the Medical
School and at the front desk of the
reading room in the Law Library.
These boxes will remain in place
until shortly after spring break.

Graduate student Jim Manheim, a disc jockey for WCBN, spins another
tune as part of the campus radio station's fundraiser Saturday.

Prof. Ali Mazrui speaks on
the African 'dual diaspora'

by Ken Walker
State University of New York-
Binghamton Professor Ali Mazrui
addressed a crowd of roughly 150
people yesterday as the keynote
speaker in the Global Africans'
Dialogue, sponsored by the Office of
Minority Affairs.
Mazrui's speech discussed the
African "dual diaspora" - the di-
vergence between the cultural
backgrounds of Africans and African
Americans - and the difficulties the
two groups have in finding common
ground.
"The merger of the diaspora of
slavery:and the diaspora of colo-
nialism has to take place ... Ali
Mazrui still sounds very African.
His children sound very American,"
Mazrui said.
Mazrui covered several contro-
yersial issues in his speech. "Since
yietnam," he- said, "the United
States' propensity for militarism has
tended to be targeted dispro-
portionately at global Africa and the
Muslim world ... I am talking about
the last 10 years.
"The United States' armed forces
include a disproportionate number of
African Americans, some of whom
may indeed be Muslims. They may

be participating both in wars against
global Africa and in wars against the
Muslim world," Mazrui said.
In an interview after his speech,
Mazrui discussed his opinions on the
Persian Gulf war. "There is no doubt

disproportionate representation of
African Americans in the armed
forces," Mazrui said.
Ugo Ikemba, president of Global
Africans and an instructor in the
Pilot Program, was one of the
people responsible for bringing
Mazrui to speak at the Dialogue.
"(Mazrui) is a controversial guy,"
Ikemba said, "Some of the things he
said, I may have different opinions
on. But most of the things he said I
agree with."
Mazrui, a native of Kenya, is
Albert Schweitzer Chair in the
Humanities at SUNY. He currently
holds University appointments as
both professor of Afro-American and
African Studies and professor of
Political Science. He is well-known
for his PBS television series, The
Africans.
The Global Africans' Dialogue
was sponsored by the University
Office of Minority Affairs with ad-
ditional support from Alice Lloyd
Residence Hall, Pilot Program for
Intergroup Relations, Ecumenical
Center, African Christian Student
Association, Global Africans Or-
ganization, and the African/Afri- can
American Dialogue Group.

Mazrui

that the United States is the most
trigger-happy single nation-state in
the world today, and that's a pity
because I am very fond of this
country. It has been very good to
me."
"I just don't like the idea that
African Americans are involved in
killing fellow Africans, or killing
Muslims," he said.
"There is no doubt that the so-
cietal deprivations accounts for the

Woodwork
Reg Williams - a faculty member in the School of Nursing - adds finishing coats of lacquer to part of a coffee
table he's been working on for relaxation in his free time.

WhT'spHE LIST
Wat's happening in Ann Arbor today

Meetings
Enact, weekly meeting. DANA Bldg.,
Rm. 1040,7:00.
People of Color Against War &
Racism, weekly meeting. West Engi-
neering, 1st floor Center for African &
Afro-American Studies Lounge, 5:00.
U of M Asian American Student
Coalition (UMAASC), weekly mtg.
Workshop on the Persian Gulf Crisis.
E. Quad, rm 126,7 p.m.
American Association of University
Professors, Chapter Mtg. League,
Michigan Rm, noon.
Speakers
"Chemistry of Transition Metal
Complexes of Extremely Weak
Lewis Bases," Charles Winter of
Wayne State University. Chem Bldg,
rm 1640,4 p.m.
"The Role of a Pharmacology De-
partment in a .Medical School,"
Mark Nickerson of McGill University.
7412 Med Sci I, 2 p.m.
"Davis, Markert Nickerson Lec-
ture on Academic and Intellectual
Freedom," Robert O'Neill, founding
director of the Center for the Protec-
tion of Free Expression. Rackham
Amphitheater, 4 p.m.
"Lettres A Une Noire De Francoise
Ega: La Femme De Menage De
Lettres," Mireille Rosello of the
University of Illinois. MLB, 4th Floor

"Landscape Planning Method to
Improve Water Quality in the Ma-
surian Landscape of Poland," Ed-
ward Bartman of Warsaw Agricultural
University, Poland and Prof. Kenneth
Polakowski. 1046 Dena, noon-1.
Furthermore
Safewalk, nighttime safety walking
service. Functions 8-1:30 Sun.-Thurs.,
Fr.-Sat. 8-11:30. Call 936-1000 or
stop by 102 UGLi.
Northwalk, nighttime safety walking
service. Functions Sun.-Thurs. 8-1:30
am., Fri.-Sat. 8-11:30. Call 763-
WALK or stop by 2333 Bursley.
ECB Peer Writing Tutors available
to help with your papers Sun.-Thurs.,
Angell/Haven Computing Center, 7-
11:00 p.m.; 611 Church Street Com-
puting Center, Tue. and Thurs. 7-11:00
p.m., Wed. 8-10:00. p.m.
U of M Shorin-Ryu Karate-do Club.
For info call 994-3620. Every Monday,
CCRB, Small Gym, 8-9:00.
U of M Tae Kwon Do Club. Every
Monday, CCRB Martial Arts Rm., 7-
8:30.
U of M Ninjitsu Club, Monday prac-
tice. Call David Dow (668-7478) for
info. I.M. Bldg., Wrestling Rm., 7-
9:00.
Guild House Winter Writers Se-
ries. 802 Monroe, 8:30.
Panel Discussion: H. Chandler Davis,

Acquaintance
rape victims
report assaults
A University staffer working
in Legal Research was assaulted
by another staffer last Tuesday
morning in the Legal Research
building, which houses the law
library.
According to DPSS reports, the
incident involved minor touching
and is being classified as a fourth
degree criminal sexual assault.
There was no injury reported.
An Ann Arbor woman re-
ported last Wednesday that she
was raped by a boyfriend last Au-
gust in her friend's home.
The woman told Ann Arbor po-
lice that she was with her friend
watching a movie when he forced
himself on her.
Ann Arbor police said the
woman did not want to press
charges, but felt she needed to file
the complaint.
* A rape that occurred
between two Ann Arbor Pioneer
High School students last week is

PO0LI CE
still undergoing investigation by
Ann Arbor police.
At about 2:30 p.m. on Feb. 7, a
teacher at the high school, accom-
panied by a small group of stu-
dents, opened the door to a small
room adjacent to the high school's
auditorium projection booth to find
a 15-year-old student raping a 14-
year-old classmate. Although the
young woman did not scream or
say anything at the time, she later
told her school counselor that she
had indeed been raped, juvenile
Detective David Jachalke said.
"She had known him for a cou-
ple of weeks - they had become
friends to some degree - he just
transferred to the high school a few
weeks ago," Jachalke said.
The student had pieviously
been a patient at a psychological
treatment facility, Jachalke added.
"Someone made the decision to
enroll him in Pioneer High School

as a mainstream student,"
Jachalke said. The alleged as-
sailant had previously been routed
through a special-education track
in the Ann Arbor district.
Last Monday, Judge John Kirk-
endall ruled that the assault should
be qualified as a criminal sexual
assault in the first degree, which,
in the adult penal system, could
carry up to life in prison.
Graffitiers want
Bush to stop
Beginning last Wednesday
night, University staff and officers
at the Department of Safety and

Security (DPSS) discovered "Stop
Bush" graffiti all over campus.
The graffitiers sprayed thre
University vehicles last Wedne f
day night, causing about $300 i
damage. Graffiti was also discov!
ered on a bus shelter at the intet
section of Bonisteel and Murfin
roads. Yesterday, more graffiti ws
discovered on North Campus with
the same "Stop Bush" slogan ap,
pearing on the exteriors of Bursley'
Hall and the North Campus ComA
mons.
Kiosks around campus received
their share of sprayings, but appar.
ently weren't proofread by the graf4
fitier, who sprayed "Stop Bussh."

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SPRMG BREAK '91
uY FT. LAUDERDALE AT
on the beach
Fr. LAUDERDALE'5PREWERE
CONCERT AND DANCE CLUB
18 YEARS AND OLDER ADMITTED
10 A.M. to 6 P.M. POOLSIDE PARTIES
\vED.J.EMCEEINGPOOLSIDE CONTEST " WATERVOLLEYBALL
TOURNAM.NT FREE T-SHIRT RELAYS " THE BELLYFLOP CONTEST
TOP OFF THE DAY WITH... SUMMERS FAMOUS SWIMSUIT CONTEST
CASH PRIZES " FREE T-SHIRTS AND OTHER GIVEAWAYS
7 P.M. TO 8:30 P.M.
COLLEGE HAPPY HOUR
UNIV. OF MICHIGAN PARTY * MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25
FREE SPRING BREAK '91 T-SHIRT WITH PAID ADMISSION FOR ABOVE
COLLEGE STUDENTS BETWEEN 7 &8:0 P.M. WITH PROPER COLLEGEI.D.
AT 7V 3 A V VnF~hTP A Un nraA E lV-A'r

IMMIGRATION LAW
Attorneys at Law
Eugene Oak, Ph.D. (Flu ent in Korea n)
P , A A YL

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