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February 18, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-18

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily - Monday, February 18, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

by BillWatterson Bridge Club competes for title
by Garrick Wang

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By Alan Landau
BESIDES, THIS WILL
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TENURE."
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Four University students will be
competing as a team against five
other collegiate teams in the North
American Collegiate Bridge
Championship title next month.
"I'm looking forward to compet-
ing with other schools that have
won their regional competitions,"
said Ning Li, an electrical engi-
neering graduate student and a
member of the team. "I hope we
can play well and win the champi-
onship."
Li said four members of the
University's Bridge Club qualified
to compete in the championship by
earning the highest aggregate
score in its region. The competing
schools were assigned into five
conferences based on their geo-
graphic location.
The Bridge Club held a campus

competition last November to
qualify for the title.
The campus competition con-
sisted of 10 pairs of club members
divided into two equal teams. The
pairs played against each other to
determine the two team winners.
Fan Jiang, a computer science
graduate student and Li's partner,
said the winning teams' aggregate
scores were submitted to the
American Contract Bridge League.
The national organization used the
scores to determine the regional
champions.
Li said the five regional cham-
pions and an at-large team will
compete against each other in At-
lantic City, N.J., next month.
According to a press release,
each team will play the other five
competing teams twice. The four
highest scoring teams will then

advance into the semifinal round.
The four schools that advance
will be paired and play two
matches to determine the finalists.
The finalists will compete in a
single elimination "knockout"
round to determine the national
champion.
Jiang said the other five teams
competed for the championship
last year. This year's competition
includes Harvard, Stanford, Rice,
Cal Tech, and Virginia.
Jiang said he and his team-
mates will play some mock games
before traveling to Atlantic City.
He hopes a national championship
will attract students to join the
Bridge Club.
"It's a fun game ... we would
like more to join and enjoy the
game," Jiang said.

Former Contra 'Comandante' slain

" 1 f / /

MANAGUA, Nicaragua (AP)
- An official from the Sandinista-
controlled security police yester-
day promised a full-scale probe
into the slaying of former Contra
chief Enrique Bermudez, whose
death cast doubt on government
assurances for the safety of other
rebels who laid down their arms.
But a right-wing radio station
blamed the slaying of Bermudez
late Saturday on Sandinista sym-
pathizers, some of whom cheered

the news of the killing.
Officials said they had no sus-
pects and no one claimed respon-
sibility for the killing.
Bermudez was shot outside his
car near the downtown Interconti-
nental Hotel Saturday night. The
assassin reportedly fled on foot.
Vice Interior Minister Jose Pal-
lais said it appeared Bermudez
was followed, and was shot twice
from a distance of five to six feet.
Taxi driver Rene Sanchez said

a man looked at the body and said,
"He is 380, Enrique Bermudez."
Bermudez's nom de guerre was
"Comandante 380."
Bermudez was a colonel in the
brutal National Guard that propped
up dictator Anastasio Somoza and
was Nicaragua's military attache
in Washington when the Sandin-
istas toppled Somoza in 1979.
Sports Minister Carlos Garcia
said the killing had diminished the
safety of ex-Contras.

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ARTS
Continued from page 1
sion will be combined.
"As far as the administration is
concerned, the councils will be
merged," Mitchell said.
Goldman said that the gover-
nor's proposals - if passed - will
change the structure of the arts in
Michigan.
"The bottom line is that the arts
will look completely different in
the state from today," Goldman
said.
MCA had a general fund of
$13.5 million this year, Goldman
said, $700,000 of which came from
the federal government's National
Endowment for the Arts (NEA).
The Detroit Symphony Orchestra
receives $2.6 million from MCA

funds. Grants to other art programs
total $9.1 million. The remaining
funds are used for administrative
purposes, Goldman said.
If the Commission on Art in
Public Places - which received
$400,000 from the state last year
- and MCA were combined, they
would receive a proposed total
budget of $900,000, Mitchell said.
The combined councils would re-
vamp their missions to promote
and find private funding for arts in
Michigan - instead of actually
doling out funds.
This would mean grant money
would be eliminated and art orga-
nizations throughout Michigan
would lose portions of their bud-
gets.
In addition to the direct effects
of losing state funding, some NEA

grants would also be in jeopardy,
Goldman said. She explained that
in order to receive many federal
grants, they must be matched in
dollar amounts by the state.
"It's very likely that we will
lose federal dollars because we
will not be able to match them,"
Goldman said. Even the current
10.4 percent cuts will make it im-
possible to match federal funds,
she said.
People Dancing, an Ann Arbor
based contemporary and modern
dance company, is one group that
would be directly affected if the
state is unable to match federal art
funds. People Dancing was one of
seven Michigan arts programs cho-
sen as part of a $350,000 devel-
opment program sponsored by the

NEA. The company received
$10,000 this year to plan how it
would use its share of the funds,
but it is unlikely there will be state
funds to actually implement the@
program next year.
"If there are significant cuts
what will happen to that pro-
gram?" People Dancing Board of
Directors President Diane Rosen-
blatt said. "If there's no Michigan
Council for the Arts, the develop-
ment program is done for - it's
gone."
In tomorrow's paper: How vari-
ous Ann Arbor art organizations
plan to handle the recommended
state cuts, and the community's re-
sponse to the proposed reductions.

GULF
Continued from page 1
in Washington.
If a deal is struck in

three days, it will probably emerge
from negotiations involving the
Soviet Union and Iran.
A Soviet official said their pro-
posals resemble Iran's, which re-

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portedly call for an Iraqi with-
drawal from Kuwait, removal of
U.S.-led Gulf forces, and stationing
of Islamic peacekeeping forces as
a buffer between Kuwait and Iraq.
But Moscow has not yet offered a
peace plan.
Secretary of State James Baker
said yesterday he is confident the
Soviets still support the anti-Iraq
coalition, but he also said any
peace plan that emerges must de-
mand that Iraq withdraw quickly
and unconditionally.
"We say no cease-fire, no
pause, get out of Kuwait," Baker
said.
The Bush administration vowed
yesterday to continue the allied
bombing campaign while the So-
viets seek a diplomatic solution to
the Persian Gulf War.
Soviet officials were initially
encouraged by Iraq's offer last Fri-
day to withdraw from Kuwait, but
they later said the many conditions
Baghdad attached to the offer
make it unacceptable.
Iraqi Foreign Minister Tariq
Aziz is meeting today with Soviet

President Mikhail Gorbachev.
Earlier news reports said Gor-
bachev asked President Bush not
to start a ground war until Aziz
concludes the Moscow talks.
Updating the war:
During one pre-dawn skirmish,
an American Apache attack heli-
copter firing Hellfire missiles de-
stroyed two American military ve-
hicles, killing two soldiers and
wounding six, the U.S. Command
said.
It was the worst friendly-fire
accident since Jan. 29, when a
U.S. warplane hit a Marine recon-
naissance vehicle during a furious
tank battle along the Saudi-Kuwait
border and seven American sol-
diers were killed.
Also, travelers reaching Nicosia
yesterday gave vivid accounts of
an anti-Saddam Hussein protest by
as many as 5,000 people in Iraq
earlier this month. The travelers *
said demonstrators shot and killed
10 officials of Iraq's ruling Baath
Arab Socialist Party, who tried to
stop the protest.

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