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February 15, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-15

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, February 15, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

by Bill Watterson

F"A 91% 1N TNT. SM ,
S7TPENDO(US MAN TKES
ADVANG~E EAWS
ST~oIG RYT!

A DIMI T IA T!!
STUPENDOUS
MAN TlZmAPNS

WIT ANNOYING 67RL
BACK- TOESUME HI
t tENTT .

)~ R ZMAS SAVE EIGNS BUSIES M
MOE'I WAT TO
'IBY A 'X

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Cons
Continued from page 1
who is already intoxicated.
Atkinson said they have placed
undercover officers inside bars.
"Two uniformed police officers
come down at least once a night,"
said Les Schwanbeck, day bar-
tender at the Blind Pig/Eight Ball
Saloon on S. First. "They talk to
the doorman and if anyone looks
suspicious, they will ask to look at
their i.d."
Not only is it a misdemeanor
for a minor to try to obtain alcohol,
but students using fake i.d.s can
cause problems for the i.d. owner
with the Secretary of State's of-
fice.
"Things like this could show up
on a record and prevent someone
from getting a job," Atkinson said.
Good Time Charlie's and
Rick's American Cafe are two
campus bars that changed their
minimum age for admission from
19 to 21.
"It's a tough job to separate the
two age groups, although they're
still responsible to make sure there
is no under-age drinking," Atkin-
son said. "It's in (the bars') own
best interests to change to 21."
Rick's has always taken a
strong stance on fake i.d.s, said
Owner Steve Crowley. There are
always two men at the door, who

are encouraged with a reward of $5
per i.d. to confiscate fakes.
Rick's first tried limiting ad-
mission to customers 21 and over
on Wednesday nights - which
used to have 300 people inside and
a line of 300 outside the bar -
from March to September 1990,
and found that they did not lose
much business.
"We lost the groups of people
of mixed ages over and under 21,"
Crowley said. "But basically once
we turned 21 every night, our
Wednesdays, Friday happy hours,
and weekends held on. Mondays
and Tuesdays have picked up
since January."
The average age of Rick's em-
ployees is 25 or 26, because of an
over-21 hiring policy.
"Due to the increased public
awareness of alcohol and under-
age drinking," Crowley said, "we
decided to remove ourselves from
that whole issue by changing to
21."
"We feel by doing so we'll be
better poised to adapting to the
new market conditions and police
concerns," he said.

Student controversy exists in
both directions over the changes in
admission age.
"It's not fair to incoming fresh-
men because it limits their social
activities," LSA senior Alan Tay-
lor said. "At the bars I went to, I
had little trouble getting in and @
drinking."
"However, if a student is old
enough to serve in the Gulf War,
then he or she is old enough to be
served alcohol," Taylor said.
LSA sophomore Lainie Lindner
said, "It's unfair that the bars have
changed to 21, but it has not seri-
ously inhibited my social life.
There are plenty of other things to
do, and when I turn 21, going to
the bar will be just another op-
tion," she said.
Rick Buhr, president of the cor-
poration which owns Charlie's,
said the main reason for changing
from 19 to 21 was crowd control,
and that Charlie's business has not
suffered.
"It's a difficult problem," he
said. "There are a lot of very good
fake i.d.s out there, but we do our
best to try to catch them."

Dooder State College

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DIE.
/ 4 4

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MEMBERS
Continued from page 1
grown up in a university town
which has a deputized campus se-
curity force, Eshelman said the
idea ofa deputized security force
is not a strange one for her.
"I'm not totally against it but
I'm not sure the decision to depu-
tize was brought about in the right
way," she said.
Eshelman said, however, she
would not make up her mind one
way or the other on the issue of
deputization until she could get
more information.
Other committee members
agreed with Eshelman, saying they
needed more information before
they could make up their minds on
the issue.
Engineering junior Trudy
Robertson said that while she ini-
tially opposed the deputized force,
the inadequacies of the Ann Arbor
police force pushed her into
reevaluating her opinion.
Robertson said that once she

does more research on the
force's recommendations she
be able to form an opinion.

task
will

Similarly, second-year law stu-
dent Timothy Williams said he
had not had time to look at the is-
sue carefully enough to oppose or
support a deputized security force.
All three students, Eshelman,
Robertson, and Williams said they
had not participated in the rallies
and protests against deputization
held last term.
The fourth student committee
member, Peter McPartlin, refused
to comment on his feelings regard-
ing deputization.
According to Dawson, commit-
tee members were chosen by their
ability to represent the various
campus areas which all have dif-
ferent safety concerns.
As a result, an engineering stu-
dent, a member of the Residence
Hall Association, a member of the
Greek community and a law
school student were chosen.

NOW HIRING

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FOR THESE PART-TIME POSITIONS:
CLERK/CASHIERS PRODUCE CLERKS
STOCK CLERKS DELI/PASTRY CLERK
SOME OF THE ADVANTAGES OFFERED
" STARTING RATE $5.50/HOUR
" FLEXIBLE WORK SCHEDULES
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OTHER POSITIONS AT COMPETITIVE STARTING RATES
ALSO AVAILABLE.
APPLICATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED AT
2020 GREEN STREET (at PLYMOUTH)
TUESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY, 10:00 A.M. TO 8:00 P.M.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F

SITE She added that the University
Continued from page 1 claimed they would meet periodi-
cally with residents to make sure
the community and the effects the
site will have on the children than the study was covering the issues
with saving money. residents were concerned with.
B "(The presidential policy) has
SYL A ~S questionable legal force. It is un-
Continued from page 1 der the discretion of the adminis-
a presidential policy carry the tration so it can be repealed,"
same weight in court, said Uni- said Rackham graduate student
versity administrators. Sam Kaufman.
Since lesbians and gay males Gay male and lesbian groups
are not covered under federal af- say that a change in the bylaw
firmative action, adding them to would also have a positive psy-
the bylaw would be bucking fed- chological effect on them in mak-
eral law, said University General ing them feel like a part of a
Counsel Elsa Cole. larger community.
"Affirmative action means that "(A change in the bylaw)
an institution tries to increase the would further legitimize the 10 to
number of people with certain 12 percent of lesbian, gay, and
characteristics. This has a differ- bisexual people here. It would be
ent meaning than saying someone a positive thing and a step further
in recognizing the harassment
should not discriminate. A regen- that happens here," said LSA se-
tal bylaw would duplicate what niat haysonsCur, d A
already does exist at a different nior Jayson Curry.
leeady doeshexUivrsataiCe.All parties agree this issue is
level in the University," Cole in the regents' hands and many
said. administrators are skeptical that
Students contend a change in the bylaw will be changed soon.
the bylaw would provide them Both Executive Director of
with a legal basis to fight discrim- University Relations Walter Har-
ination. They don't believe the rison and Thorson said they did
presidential policy would stand up not expect a bylaw change in the
in court. near future.
GSbe Aidc44n ai g
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
for two terms, $22 for one term. Campus delivery $28 for two terms. Prorated rates: Starting March 1,
1991, $11 for balance of term to 4/24/91.
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
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