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February 12, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-12

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, February 12, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

olwmsk S'i ICN~T
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by. Bill Watterson
, oR ? MOM MUST.VE
PUT 91 CAPE
IR TT WeRONG
i y DR E A.

Regents approve promotion'
for 'U' Washington lobbyist

by Henry Goldblatt
Daily Administration Reporter
The University's top lobbyist in
Washington, D.C. received a pro-
motion from the University's Board
of Regents Friday.
Thomas Butts, currently the
University's Government Relations
officer and Executive Director of
the Washington office, will as-
sume the position of associate vice
president for government relations
March 1.
University President James
Duderstadt established the Univer-
sity's Washington, D.C. office last
year to strengthen the University
relations with the Federal Gov-
ernment. The D. C. office lobbies
for higher education and handles
University affairs in the nation's
capital. As well, the office works
with other universities which have
Washington offices to influence
national education policy.
"(The Washington, D.C. office)
is the base of operation for visiting
faculty and to support students
when they are in Washington
D.C.," Butts said.

education... We have been watch
ing the question if (Social Secu-
rity) taxes ought to be taken out o(
students' paychecks who are enm:
ployed at the University," Butts
said. -
"We are working hard to de-,
velop a proposal for the reautho-
rization of the higher education act
to begin to change provisions to@
provide more grants and loans for,
students," he added.
Vice President for Government
Relations, Richard Kennedy,
Butt's supervisor, said he is;
pleased with the promotion.
"(Butts) has been at that task,
for almost a decade. His experi=
ence and effectiveness in dealing
with the federal arena was the'
principle criterion we used."
Butts has been employed by the,
University from 1964 to 1977 and
then again from 1981 to the pre-.
sent. During his tenure at the Uni-
versity, Butts served as director of-
student orientation and director of
student financial aid.

Dooder State College

MOONRIVER, I'D HEY
LIKE Yo TO DAVE LET'S
MEET DAVE. GET STONED.
y.~

i DON'T KNOW i DON'T
15NT THjAT KNOW, DAVE,
BAD FOR LET'S GET
YOVR HEALTH? STONED.
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BEFORE( DO THIS, I
WAS W'ONDERING,
COULD ThiS DAIA&E
/' VOCAL CORDS, STUNT MY
GROWNMAKE ME SICK...
/O

By Alan Landau
I AIN'T NO BOTANIST.
I JU5T SMOKE
THE STUFF.

Butts
Although Butts is pleased with
his new position, he said his re-
sponsibilities will remain essen-
tially the same.
Tax issues will top Butts'
agenda this semester. "As always
we will be following the budget
and tax issues that affect higher

'U' to modernize classrooms,'.
lecture halls, outpatient unit

f-

I

BURGER KING
Is now accepting
applications for all shifts
for the new restaurant
located in the
G alleria Mall
r1Those interested in applying, do so
February 11-12-13
between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m.
at
1214 S. University
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
BU@RGER
xKIN

The U-M School of Music
presents the inaugural
Ethel V. Curry
Distinguished
Lecture in
Musicology
Howard Mayer
Brown
University of Chicago,
President of the Renaissance
Society of America
"In Praise of Josquin and
the Virgin Mary"
Thursday, February 14
4:00 p.m.
Blanche Anderson Moore
Hall, School of Music,
North Campus
Free & open to the public
Reception to follow
II611

by Todd Lebowitz
The University's Board of Re-
gents unanimously approved $1.6
million in building renovations
Friday and cleared the way for the
hospital's Ambulatory Care Ad-
ministration to permanently
relocate.
The building renovations are
part of an ongoing effort to mod-
ernize classrooms and auditoriums.
Last year, the University com-
pleted renovations in Angell Hall,
Lorch Hall, and Dennison auditori-
ums in addition to classroom im-
provements in Angell Hall, Mason
Hall, and the Frieze Building.
"This is a major, major opera-
tion," said Paul Spradlin, Director
of Plant Extension. "We have lit-
erally hundreds of classrooms and
auditoriums that require renova-
tions, and most have not been ren-
ovated in thirty or forty years."
This year's projects include up-

grading the Natural Science and
C.C. Little auditoriums and class-
rooms in the Modern Language
Building, C.C. Little, and the
School of Education.
"A lot of classrooms and audi-
toriums need renovation," said Co-
lette Stinger, an LSA first-year
student. "Seats are too close to-
gether and desks are torn. We need
an environment so we're able to
study well."
The renovations will make the
rooms more attractive and func-
tional as well as improve ventila-
tion and fire exits.
"We've known that our class-
rooms have not been up to Univer-
sity standards in terms of quality,"
Spradlin said. "We recognize that
they are very antiquated."
The Board of Regents' decision
to move the Ambulatory Care Ad-
ministration (ACA) offices to the

- -

REGENTS
Continued from page 1
punitive measures were never
suggested as a means to curb the
disruptions.
One reason for this apparent
change of attitude on the part of
regents is their growing impatience
with what they consider uncivi-
lized behavior and a lack of atten-
tion to social convention.
"This has been going on long
enough. Students should be able to
articulate their views but in the
proper manner. When they assault
people, shut down buildings, or in-
terrupt the normal course of busi-
ness, something has to be done,"
Nielsen said.
Another reason for this stronger
stance is the contradiction regents
see in the students' arguments. For
example, they say if students feel
so strongly about having the
chance to speak with regents about
their concerns, then why stage die-
ins at public comments and take
COMMITTEE
Continued from page 1
tion, school and organization affil-
iation, class standing, gender, eth-
nic background and sexual orienta-
tion.
Dawson said every effort was
made to achieve a fair balance of
these factors.
Eshelman said she joined be-
cause she hoped that using
"students and faculty would bring
a more rounded outlook to the ad-
ministration about what the stu-
dents are actually feeling."
McPartlin said that in addition
to improving campus safety, he
hoped the committee would be
able to improve the student and
administration relations.
The committee has no set date
to meet yet but hopes to convene
sometime before spring break.
Faculty chosen for the commit-
tee include: business law Prof.
George Cameron; English Prof.

over the sessions while posing as
the regents.
Regent Phil Power (D-Ann Ar-
bor) described the student take
'Of the six regents'
meetings and public
comments sessions
held within the last
year, only one went
off without hitch'
over of last week's public com-
ments as "disingenuous" and said
he was disappointed other students
were deprived the chance to talk
to regents about issues such as the;
recent hike in residence hall rates.
Yet student disrupters say the,
takeover did not deny anyone the
chance to speak because public
comments is not a real public fo-
rum. Students say to have a truly,
public forum the regents should;
publicize the public comments and
replace the speakers' list system,

now vacant fifth floor of the Medi-
cal Professional Building com-
pletes a three year transitional
phase.
The ACA, responsible for out*
patient care at the medical center,
has operated out of a trailer since
March 1988, when they turned
over their space at the Taubman
facility to the medical department:
By October, they expect their re-
location to be complete.
"Everyone will be happier to be
working in permanent space," said'
Patricia Warner, Associate Hospi-
tal Director of Ambulatory Care,9
"but the trailer has not negatively
impacted our work."
The Ambulatory Care Adminis-
tration oversees 750,000 outpatient
visits to over 180 clinics annually.
Funding for these improvements
will be allocated from the Univer-
sity's general fund.
with an open microphone set up.
Furthermore, the students see
the apparent turning of the tide by -
the regents as a possibly good,
omen.
"It shows we are having an im-x.
pact if they are reacting to stu
dents the way they are," second
year Rackham graduate student"
Nancy Mirabal said.
Students agreed, however, that
the regental threats of suspension
for disruption of meetings would.*
not deter their efforts.
"When we obstruct mediums,.-
it's a way of saying listen to us. If
they were really listening to us,
then we wouldn't have to disrupt
as a last resort," Mirabal said "We
will not shy away from our de-
mands because of their threats."
With two regents' meetings re-
maining in the '90-'91 academic
school year, the chances of stu-
dents ending their disruptions seeni
slim but regental action against
student disrupters may be soon to
come.

TIg 1AIirboan aC~
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
for two terms, $22 for one term. Campus delivery $28 for two terms. Prorated rates: Starting March 1,
1991, $11 for balance of term to 4/24/91.
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336,
Circulation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550.

*r

C1t6.

y
v Candy and Flowers

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