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February 06, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-06

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, February 6, 1991

GULF
Continued from, page 1
is successfully cutting supply lines
to Iraqi troops at "a pretty fantastic
rate," said Col. John McBroom,
commander of the First Tactical
Fighter Wing.
In an interview with the Asso-
ciated Press and two other news
organizations, McBroom said more
bombing runs are being aimed at
addam's troops each day. The al-
lies are able to concentrate on the
troops because they are easing up
on earlier targets, including Iraq's
nuclear and chemical facilities.
"Most of our sorties now are
geared toward attriting out the
people in Kuwait," McBroom said,
using the military euphemism for
killing. "We're taking a very
heavy toll on the troops."
McBroom, whose wing flies F-
15 escorts for allied bombers, said
the success of air attacks on Iraqi
troops had convinced him that any
plans for an allied ground assault
should be put on hold.
British officers yesterday re-
ported strikes on an ammunition
storage site south of Baghdad, and
a railway junction and rail bridge
in southeast Iraq, among other tar-
gets.
Baghdadis were told by official
radio yesterday that all sales of
heating oil and other fuel had been
banned.

BUDGET
Continued from page 1
crafted to minimize their impact
on average depositors.
Individual depositors would be
covered for no more than $200,000
per institution, eliminating exotic
combinations of trust and joint ac-
counts which now enable families
to insure more than $1 million.
Moreover, regulators would be dis-
couraged from fully reimbursing
uninsured deposits, which they
have done so far in virtually all
bank failures.
Longstanding laws barring
commercial and industrial compa-
nies from owning banks would
crumble, as would the division of
banking from the insurance and
securities industry.

Gorbachev rejects proposed B
MOSCOW (AP) - Mikhail lin's terms. The decree did not dum.
Gorbachev stepped up his war of threaten any action if the poll was That referendum will ask: "Do
words with Lithuanian leaders yes- held, indicating only that the you think it is necessary to pre-
terday by rejecting their indepen- Kremlin would not accept its re- serve the Soviet Union as a re-

dence poll set for Saturday and or-
dering instead a Kremlin-con-
trolled referendum.
Lithuanian President Vytautas
Landsbergis insisted the nonbind-
ing ballot. would be held as
planned.
"Lithuania is in observance of
law ... and views the president's
decree as impermissible political
interference in the matters of the
sovereign Lithuanian state," he
said.
The decree followed Gor-
bachev's order for new talks with
the Baltics and seemed a clear at-
tempt to force Lithuanians to seek
independence only on the Krem-

sults.
"The poll and the attempt to
call it a 'plebiscite on the future of
the Lithuania state' are legally in-
valid," his decree said, according
to the state news agency Tass.
The poll "cannot be seen as
anything other than an attempt to
block...the holding of a national
referendum on the question of pre-
serving the Soviet Union," said
Gorbachev, who has called for all
fifteen republics to vote March 17
on whether to preserve the union.
He ordered national authorities
and Soviet-controlled officials in
Lithuania to "ensure strict imple-
mentation" of the national referen-

newed federation of equal,
sovereign republics in which the
rights and freedoms of people of
all ethnic groups will be fully
guaranteed?"
The Lithuanian poll asks: "Do
you support the idea that Lithuania
must be an independent, demo-
cratic republic?"
Voters must answer "Yes" or
"No." Soviet experts have noted
that both questions are loaded to
elicit "Yes" responses.
At least five republics have re-
fused to hold referendums under
Soviet law, which they reject on
their territory.
Three of the republics, includ-

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Continued from page 1
Hughes modified these rates to
account for the Housing Division's
merger with other offices. The re-
gents must approve the proposed
rates in order for them to take
effect.
"We met in November and
early December, and things
changed after we met with the
merger between the Housing Divi-
sion and Michigan Union," said
Larry Durst, business manger for
the University Housing Office.
The Single Student Housing
Rate Study Committee originally
recommended a 5.9 percent in-
crease in housing rates - 5.6 per-
cent for inflation and .3 percent to
shift the purchase of mattresses
from the reserve budget to the op-
erating budget.
"The 5.6 percent rate increase
is to cover a market basket of
things... wages, raw food costs,
utilities, and telephone," Foulke
said.
Although the committee does
not formally fix ratios between
room and board, board averages 48
percent of the rate which a student
pays and room makes up the re-
maining amount.
The Family Housing Rate
Study Committee originally re-
quested a five percent rate in-
crease, but due to the expansion of
the Housing Division, residents of
1,672 family housing units will pay
an average of 5.4 percent more per
year. For instance, a furnished one-
bedroom apartment at University
Terrace will increase from $375 to
$390 per month.

altic poll.
ing Lithuania, scheduled alterna-
tive polls. Gorbachev's decree did
not mention Estonia's vote on
March 3 or Georgia's on March 31.0
The decree as reported by Tass
did not say what measures woldd
be taken to enforce the March 17
vote. Soviet authorities could call
a vote on that date, but it would be
difficult if not impossible to carry
out republic-wide balloting without
cooperation of the local govern-
ment.
s
Lithuanian leaders "are taking
advantage of the aggravated so-
cial-political atmosphere in the re-
public. (Lithuania's) leadership is
trying, with the help of this poll, to
organize support for its separatist
aspirations," the decree said.
Director of Family Housing Eric
Luskin explained the discrepancy
between the two inflation estiW
mates occurred because the two
types of housing rely on different
sources of energy.
"The two committees' esti-
mates won't be exactly the same
because we have little reliance on
steam, but a high reliance on natu-
ral gas. Residence halls are highly
reliant on steam. The inflation es-
timate for gas is nine percent, bt*
for steam it is four percent. The
rates depend on the building and
the building's needs," Luskin said.
Both committees looked to
other universities for information
regarding inflation to set their
housing rates.
"We remain cognizant of
where we are in relation to other
schools. In. the state of Michigan*
we are one of the most expensive.
In the Big Ten we are close to the
top... Schools exchange informa-
tion on what projections they have
made in terms of the rate of infla-
tion, utilities," Foulke said.
Foulke said that during his in-
volvement with the Single Student
Housing Rate Study Committee,
housing rates have remained con-
sistent with inflation.a
"Our rate increases have stayed
extremely consistent - not in ex-
cess of the increase in the Con-
sumer Price Index... When there
have been slight variations it has
been because of an increase or de-
crease in services or programs."

The Michigan Student Assembly
(MSA) Is Calling On Interested
Students To Apply For Vacant
Positions On University
Committees.
Student Representatives Are Needed
For The Following:
Budget Priorities Committee (1 Undergrad, 1 Grad)
Academic Affair's (1)
Campus Safety (1 or 2)
Financial Affairs (1 Undergrad)
Research Policies (1 Undergrad, 3 Grad)
Michigan League Board Rep. (1)
National Veterans Memorial Holiday Committee (1)
Honorary Degrees Committee (1 Grad)
Interested Students Should Leave Names &
Numbers For Lynn Chia At The MSA Office,
3909 Michigan Union - 763-3241
Become a
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Administrators do
the regents to change
quested rates.

not expect
Hughes' re-

ill

PREVENTION
Continued from page 1
"SAPAC is unique from other uni-
versities as one of the best-funded
programs. Most other programs
have workshops but no office."
SAPAC offers more than 50
workshops each semester on
women's empowerment, self-de-
fense, sexism awareness, sexual
harassment, and men's involve-
ment in rape prevention.
"We have turnouts of about 25
people per workshop that are al-
ways increasing," Steiner said.
"Our first few workshops had only
five participants at most."
The FBI estimates that rape is
the most underreported crime, with
less than ten percent of all rapes
reported. Statistics show that 90
percent of reported rapes involve
acquaintances of the victims.

In 1985, the year before;
SAPAC was established, three;
rapes were reported on campus. In
SAPAC's first year, the number
increased to 12. In 1989, 100 rapes
were reported at the University.
Since increasing education
causes more people to identify and.
report assault, there was a general
fear that the University would be
viewed as a rape hot spot, Steiner
said.
"This type of service is costly,"
Steiner said. "It's a matter of prior-
ity. You need to ask the adminis-
tration how they decide where the
money goes."
SAPAC has had no budget in-
crease since the office opened.40
Since then, they have developed
SAFEWALK's team walking ser-
vice and expanded the Nite Owl
bus service.

s E Burnham Associates
543 Church Street
(313) 761-1523

1001 S. FOREST
848 TAPPAN
543 CHURCH ST
610 S. FOREST

905 CHURCH ST
1506 GEDDES
515 WALNUT

CLOSE TO CAMPUS
WE PAY HEAT !
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LAUNDRY FACILITIES
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OPEN DAILY 8:30-5:30
SATURDAY 11:00-3:00

I

1, 2, 3, BEDROOM APARTMENTS

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