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February 05, 1991 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, February 5,1991

SECURITY
Continued from page 1
Unlike campus safety officers,
the University provides no formal

training for the State Security Inc.
guards, Patrick said.
"Our supervisors discuss differ-
ent subjects with them, but there is
no formal sensitivity training,"
Patrick said.

Sally Johnson, Asst. Director of
Personnel and chair of the Task
Force on Sexual Orientation, said
there are still plans to design a
brief sensitivity training for the
State Security officers.

Local blood levels high;

Calvin and Hobbes
lIE.M D, W )KN4OW RCJA TI'L Sk4O JL AND 9PACK ThlE
*fQJ WANTED tME. TOSRA'E.L SO' W M A IG RAP! 'IW
,P 'A BETTER _jTE CLTh L Ymv PT
10EA .' a F OL 4CTER RUBEROJT T'ARE
u . GAC, AND OOZcM4UP TAE
RAP

WE g WE QW0 LINE BARRELS
AND STUFF DOW THE DkklE-WNI
AND SEE NOW
MAR I iOiJ COULD
CLEAR ! Woumt
T"T 6E
GREAT '?
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Dooder State College

by Bill Watterson
I PoNI SEE Wm SOMAE
PEoPiE EVE N/AVE CARS.
By Alan Landau
THIS COVLD BE
REAtLY BAD
PVBLICITY...
fi

donation
by Brenda Dickinson
Daily Staff Reporter
Due to increased levels of do-
nated blood in the region, student
blood donations are now more
likely to augment military stocks
in the Middle East.
The Alpha Phi Omega (APO)
annual February blood drive begins
today, giving students and city res-
idents added incentive to donate
blood on campus this week.
APO, a national coed service
group, will donate the blood to the
American Red Cross of southeast-
ern Michigan. The region includes
70 hospitals, requiring 1,000 units
of blood per day.
Blood is routinely imported
from other places, but "the south-

s may go
eastern area has not had to import
blood for the last two weeks," said
Neal Fry, Red Cross Blood Repre-
sentative to the University.
"The Red Cross donation center
on Packard usually takes in 30 to
35 units per day," she added. "In
the last two weeks we've been tak-
ing in twice that."
"We require the 1,000 units per
day and anything over that is extra.
The Red Cross in this region has
shipped 200 units of blood to Op-
eration Desert Storm in the last
two weeks," Fry said.
APO chair Katie Leshock, an
LSA senior, said the increased do-
nations "enable us to better send
support to the Red Cross of opera-
tion Desert Storm in Saudi Ara-

to Gulf
bia."
Leshock said APO projects the
number of units collected this
week to increase only slightly over
past years because many people
have already given blood at other
sites.
"We have only increased the
number of units projected for Burs-
ley and in the League," Leshock.
said, hoping "the central campus
locations will work to bring in
more people."
APO has committed to collect-
ing 640 total units in the four-day
drive.
University staff, faculty and
students usually donate 6,000 units
per year, Fry said.

NO, NIS Is
®n1 rRISILE ... JUST
/ TERIRIBLE!
, 1S

IT JUST
CAN'fT 8£!
p /
J t

SHOV?' YA
CAMPUS POLICE
OFFICER?!
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'Safe Sox' hold contraceptives
and promote AIDS prevention

SUBWAY
Two for Tuesday!

4'

Buy any footlong Sub
and get your second for
9 *

BUDGET
Continued from page 1
seeks modest increases for the war
on drugs, space exploration, edu-
cation, and highway construction.
But it also seeks savings by slash-
ing domestic programs such as
Medicare, guaranteed student
loans, crop insurance, and subsi-
dies for wealthy farmers.
The $318.1 billion shortfall pro-
jected for this year comes despite
last fall's $500abillion, five-year
package of tax increases and
spending cuts.
And it's more than three times
the deficit Bush projected just a
year ago and far surpasses the $64
billion target of the Gramm-Rud-
man deficit-reduction law.
The Gramm-Rudman targets
may be more moot this year: war
and recession are underway and
both provide exemptions to the
law.

by Laurie Perl
"Safe Sex is now as easy as
putting on your socks," reads the
promotional material. "Play it safe.
'Wear' ever you go."
Safe Sox are the latest in a line
of AIDS education and prevention
novelties. The Midwest AIDS Pre-
vention Project (MAPP), a non-
profit community based organiza-
tion dedicated solely to AIDS pre-
vention and safer sex education,
announced the release of its
newest product this month.
Safe Sox are socks with a vel-
cro-flapped side pocket that holds
a condom, which is included with
each pair. The socks are available
in white, black or white with pink
trim.
Kevin Hileman, Program Direc-
tor for MAPP, said the organiza-
tion sold 700 pairs of socks in the
Detroit area in November and De-
cember. Each pair costs $7.

"People who bought the socks
loved them," he said. "We haven't
had any negative comments, and
some people are even giving them
away as gifts."
'People put them in
their pocket or their
wallet. A sock, I don't
know about'
-Wyolanda Davis
LSA senior
Students around campus differ
in their views about the socks.
Brandon Driscoll, an Engineering
sophomore, thinks Safe Sox are a
good idea. "It's in your sock, so
it's not a place that's detectable,"
he said.
First-year student Becky Win-
ston agrees. "I wouldn't try it, but
if there are people who would, it's
a good idea," she said.

.te..

Every Tuesday in February
All Day!
617 Packard
996-9140

Wyolanda Davis, LSA senior,
thinks differently. "I don't think
people will take it seriously be-
cause you can put a condom any-
where," she said. "People put
them in their pocket or their wal-
let. A sock, I don't know about."
LSA senior Lester Spence
doesn't believe people will use
them. "Regardless of its practical-
ity, it will be like flavored con-
doms - a fad," he said.
Hileman said MAPP has de-
cided to start advertising the sock
nationally as part of its AIDS
awareness and AIDS prevention
education. He thinks the national
exposure plus a newly installed
800 number will lead to increased
sales.
MAPP has developed a variety
of programs and products over the
past three years including a
"Lifesaver" poster, a "Lifeguard"
campaign, and a condom gift wrap.
required credit checks for all
Guaranteed Student Loan appli-
cants over 21 years old. Students
determined to have poor credit his-
tories would be required to obtain
a credit-worthy co-signer. Adminis-
trative costs for this credit-reform
policy would constitute $1.6 billion
of the total $2.5 billion total in-
crease for education.
The delayed dispersal policy *
would be particularly detrimental
to students, Ybarra said.
"They're actually increasing
the risk of students not being able
to stay in school. Students are go-
ing to drop out because they don't
have any money to buy books or to
register," Ybarra said.

*Second footlong must be of equal or lesser price. Not good in
combination with any other offer. No Coupon Necessary.

rm

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Fraternity
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Mass Meeting
Sigs-

GRANT
Continued from page 1
further erode the support for people
who are trying to pay for their kid's
education earning $15,000 to
$30,000 a year," Butts said.
"Obviously, that affects University
of Michigan students."
A $198.1 million reduction from
the 1991 work-study program ap-
propriation was proposed to fund
the Pell Grant increase. To counter
this reduction, the employer con-
tribution for the work-study pro-
gram was increased from 30 per-
cent to 50 percent.
This change would help stu-
dents continue to receive work-

study assistance from a program
with less funding, but at greater
cost to the employer. Some em-
ployers might be forced to employ
fewer students through the program
if they are unable to pay the extra
costs.
Other sections of the budget
proposal addressed the problem of
student loan defaults, estimated to
cost the federal government $2.7
billion in fiscal year 1991. In order
to prevent defaults, several sugges-
tions were made including:
delayed dispersal of loans for
60 days to first-year borrowers.
However, this proposal would only
affect schools with default rates of
over 30 percent.

... .._

at Alpha

e

I P.1118

Wednesday & Thursday

2/6

-2/7

{

Anderson Room

Michigan Union

__
J-Z4--

4^
1.(*

ITHACA COLLEGE
LONDON CENTER
35 Harrington Gardens
Semester or Year Programs*Transferrable Credit

NORPLANT
Continued from page 1
"I can't believe the government
isn't making more inquiries into
safer birth control," said Rhonda
Laur, University employee and
member of the Ann Arbor Commit-
tee to Defend Abortion and Repro-
ductive Rights.
"Women understand that it's
part of the attack on women's sex-
uality and reproductive rights," she
said.
Federal funding for research
and fellowships on fertility issues
has dried up in the last decade,
and Ortho Pharmaceutical Corp. is
the only major U.S. drug company
still doing research on contracep-
tives.
"It's certainly time we have an
advancement on the side of con-
traception," said State Sen. Lana
Pollack (D-Ann Arbor.)
"Executives in drug companies
are very conservative," Pollack
said. "There is a cost with the de-
velopment of contraception which
there isn't in the curing of a
disease.

"Cures for diabetes or muscular
dystrophy would be welcomed with
open arms," she added, "but con-
traception is seen as a way to al-
low people to have more sex."
In addition to the necessity of
using birth control to prevent preg-
nancy, Baker addressed the issue
of protection against sexually
transmitted diseases.
"It's typical of the young, this
feeling of invulnerability," he said.
Baker said STD incidents at UHS
are similar to those at a public
clinic.
Timm advised women to insist

on using a condom. "You have to
protect yourself," she said. "Even
if you're on the Pill and have a
one night stand, just don't tell
him."
"The only disadvantage of Nor-
plant is that it doesn't prevent
STDs," said Pollack.
Sterilization, infertility, un-
wanted pregnancies, teenage prob-
lems and the abortion rate are
problems which recent advance-
ments have yet to address, said
Sandra Waldman, public informa-
tion manager for the Population
Council.

COURSE WORK
British and International faculty teach business, communications, humanities,
mathematics/natural sciences, music, and social sciences.
EXCURSIONS
Field Trips and excursions to various sites and cities, theatres, museums, galleries,
and social and political institutions are an integral part of the curriculum.
INTERNSHIPS '
Fields for internship placement include business, communications, economics,
politics, social services, and theatre arts.
SPECIAL PROGRAM
A special intensive theatre program is offered in the spring.

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
for two terms, $22 for one term. Campus delivery $28 for two terms. Prorated rates: Starting March 1,
1991, $11 for balance of term to 4/24/91.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the College Press Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336,
Circulation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550.
EDITORIAL STAFF:

0

Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editors

F'

Opinion Editors
AssociateEditor
Weekend Editor
Associate Editor
Weekend Arts Editor
Photo Editors

Andrew Gottesman Sports Editor
Josh Minick Associate Editors
Phil Cohen, Christine Kloostra,
Donna Woodweil Arts Editors
Stephen Henderson, Dan Poux Books
Mike Fischer Film
Gil Renberg Music
Josephine Ballenger Fine Arts
Tony Silber Theater
Jose Juarez, Ken Smcdler List Editor

Matt Rennie
Theodore Cox, Phil Green,
Jeff Sheran, Dan Zoch
Mark Binl , Annette Petrusso
Valerie Shuman
Brent Edwards
Pete Shapiro
Elizabeth Lenhard
Mary Beth Barber
Christine loostra

for further information, write or call:
International Programs-CP
Ithaca College
Ithaca, New York 14850
607-274-3306
" 4

News: Chris Afendulis, Lar Barager, Jon Casden, Lynne Cohn, Brenda Dickinson, Jule Foster, Jay Garda, Henry Gddblatt,
Amanda Neuman, Shalini Patel, Melissa Peerless, Tami Polak, David Rhingold, Bethany Robertson, Lisa Sanchez, Gwen
Shaffer, Sarah Schweitzer, Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah, Jesse Snyder, Annabel Vered, Stefanie Vines, Garrick Wang.
Opinion: Russell Balimore, Geoff Earle, David Leitner, Andrew M. Levy, Jennifer Mattson, Amitava Mazumdar, Chris
Nordstom, Katie Sanders, David Schwartz, Glynn Washington, Kevin Woodson.
Sports: Jason Bank, Jeff Cameron, Ken Davidoff, Andy DeKorte, Mathew Dodge, Josh Dubow, Jeni Durst, Jim Foss, MiW Gil,
Jason Gomberg, R.C. Heaton, Ryan Herrington, David Hyman, Yoav Irom, David Kraft, Eric Lemont, Jeff Lieberman, Albert Lin,
Rod Loewenthal, Adam Miler, John Niyo, David Schechter, Ryan Sdreiber, Caryn Soidman, Rob Siegel, Eric Sidar, Andy
Stabile, Ken Sugiura, Kevin Sundman, Becky Weiss, Charie Wolfe.
Art: Greg Baise, Jen Blik, Ilene Bush, Andy Cahn, Beth Cdqult, Jenie Dahimann, Ridard S. Davis, Michael Paul Fischer,
Gregg Raxman, Forrest Green IIl, Brian Jarvinen, Mike Kclody, Jule Komorn, Mike Kuniavsky, David Lubliner, Mke Moltor,
Cardyn Pjor, Kristin Palm, Jon Rosenthal, Sue Uselmann, Mike Wison, Kim Yaged.
Photo: Brian Cantoni, Antony M. Crdil, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Michele Guy, Rob Kroenert, Suzanne Paley.
Weekend: Jonathan Chat Scott Chunack, Noahisnkel I arv 4u. Erica Knhks .Eric I eannnt Ada I mine .Crin I n e . Is

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