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January 30, 1991 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1991-01-30

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 30, 1991

ENROLLMENT
Continued from page 1
port services at the University, and
to increase the number of minority
faculty members.
Then, in 1988, University Pres-
ident James Duderstadt released
the Michigan Mandate. This
loosely-defined plan created edu-
cational programs to increase
racial and cultural sensitivity and
allocated addititional funds to mi-
nority student programs and minor-
ity faculty recruitment. The Man-

date proclaimed a University
commitment to achieve a "multi-
cultural" and "diverse" student
body.
While the University's position
on affirmative action has wavered
over the years, so too has majority
student involvement.
According to Sue Rasmussen,
an affirmative action planning of-
ficer, white students helped their
fellow Black students put pressure
on administrators during the 1970s
and participated fully in the BAM
strike.

However, in the last three or
four years, some white students
have begun to feel threatened, said
Rasmussen.
Rasmussen attributes this feel-
ing to the poor state of the econ-
omy, which makes students fearful
of their ability to land a job after
graduation. Additionally, when the
Michigan Mandate "became the
law of the land it made students sit
up and take notice" of the promi-
nent position of affirmative action
in University policy, she said.

Calvin and Hobbes

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by Bill Watterson
CALVIN, T\t0DN HPORAf
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INTO (WR SCWOOMKR.
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PROTESTERS
Continued from page 1
The defendants must accept or
refuse the offer by Mar. 3, the third
pre-trial date set by Thomassen.
Some of the students are still
hoping it won't come to that. "We
still hope the University will drop
the charges," said RC senior Liza
Featherstone.
The University has made no
such indication, and many of the
students resent the University's
persistence. RC Junior Brian Erd-
stein said, "The University should
drop the charges. They have no
business prosecuting students for
peacefully opposing their poli-
cies."
The administration's decision to
deputize campus security officers
triggered a series of protests last
term.
The sit-in was considered a last
resort by students who felt there
were no other means of communi-
cation available with the adminis-
tration. Many protesters argue the
University has effectively cut off
all student involvement in non-
academic policies by disbanding
the University Council, the only
body with voting student members
entitled to approve such policies.
Furthermore, they claim that
after rejecting student appeals
against the deputization policy,
the administration hampered
communication by closing a cru-
cial Regents' meeting to the pub-
lic.
Featherstone said, "The Uni-
versity is prosecuting the students
in order to curb student protest.
That is exactly what they said they
wouldn't do when we questioned
the legitimacy of deputization."
The students are represented by
Nick Roumel, an attorney at Stu-
dent Legal Services and Martin
Geer a private attorney. On Satur-
day the "Fleming 14" will meet to
discuss whether to offer the plea
bargain and avoid the trial, or
press their case further before the
judge.

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BUT -T TH1Nk SHE S
LEANING ToWaRRS
5bMFTHIN6 ELF, Y'KNbW
A PEP-SO N CAN SENSE tT, '
S iM LiI-CE5 ME AND F
Y'tcNoW, A LITTLE C.HARYi"
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sHIFJUS-r WAUT9>
TD Be R2IENCLS.

by Judd Winick
YOU KEEP
SYIlNG ITHAT.
Lr0 TYOURE
NOT 1.I5TE N

Anti-war wear
Emily Severance makes her way to ceramics class, wearing her politics
on her back. The jacket was custom-made by her and a friend.

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BUSH
Continued from page 1
Bush also announced he was
refocusing the decade-old Strate-
gic Defense Initiative to protect
against limited ballistic missile
threats, rather than an all-out nu-
clear war. He praised the success
of Patriot antimissile missiles, a
Star Wars-style weapon that has
destroyed dozens of Iraqi Scud
missiles.
"Let us pursue an SDI program
that can deal with any future threat
to the United States, to our forces
overseas, and to our friends and al-
lies," he said.
SAUSI
Continued from page 1
stopped to join us. [Others] with
opposing viewpoints walked by
heckling. They said, You're not
doing any good,"' Jordan said.
"Obviously we are not going to
stop the war. That's not our intent.+
We want to end the silence about
death and -the death of war."+
LSA senior Reg Goeke, a mem-
ber of Support Our Soldiers (SOS),
said the die-in was inappropriate.
"I just think that there's not a
lot of support on campus for this
type of action. The vast majority of
students are saying, 'Let's support
our troops to end this war as
quickly as possible,"' he said.

For the first time, Bush ac -
knowledged without qualification,:
that the nation is in a recession.
"People are in genuine economic
distress. I hear them," he said.
But he said, "There are rea-.
sons to be optimistic about our
economy," citing low inflation and
record export levels by U.S. firms.
"We will get this recession 7-
behind us, and return to growth
soon," Bush promised, though he
offered no blueprint for recovery.
An ABC-Washington Post poll
published Tuesday said only 45
percent of Americans approved of';.
Bush's handling of the economy,
while 49 percent disapproved.
But LSA sophomore Ben San-
dler said, "I participated because
in this war, the media is giving us
no images of dying despite the fact
that people are dying. People are
being treated like inanimate ob-
jects."

"The government is going to
censor the war footage shown,"
Sandler added. "We won't see sol-
diers coming home in body bags
like we did during Vietnam."

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Jordan said the die-ins will con-
tinue every day until the end of the
Persian Gulf War. "We will be do-
ing this every single day at the
same time and place. It is a con-
stant war memorial. It's like the
one in the Diag except that nobody
can knock it down," she said.

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GULF
Continued from page 1
The Iraqis were accused of an-
other "war crime" yesterday when
the parliamentary branch of the
Council of Europe declared the
huge oil spill threatening the Per-
sian Gulf constituted an offense
against humanity.
The black slick began a week
ago when Iraqi forces opened up
valves at Kuwait's main offshore
loading terminal, the U.S. com-
mand said. Over the weekend, U.S.

Air Force F-111's bombed key
pipeline junctions to stem the flow.
"The flow from that terminal
has stopped," U.S. command
spokesperson Brig. Gen. Pat
Stevens IV saidyesterday. "The
slick appears, additionally, to be
breaking up."
But fears mounted of an ecolog-
ical catastrophe, as U.S. and Saudi
experts flew over the slick and
fanned out along the coastline with
oil-protection booms, oil-skimming
boats, and other equipment."

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Applications due March 15, 1991
Ann-o.-oI n frnr.-.- an riA tnlr i fn~r matinn myi

6 br Lidi9ja EaiI
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail for fall and winter $39
for two terms, $22 for one term. Campus delivery $28.00 for two terms. Prorated rates: Starting March
1, 1991, $11 for balance of term to 4/24/91.
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336,
Circulation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550

EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Editor
Associate Editors
Weekend Editor
Associate Editor
Weekend Arts Editor

Noah Finkel
Krisine LaLonde
Diane Cook, Ian Hoffman
Josh Mitnick, Noele Vance
David Schwartz
Mike Fischer, Stephen
Henderson, I. Matthew Miler,
Daniel Poux
Gil Renberg
Josephine Ballenger
Tony Silber

Sports Editor
Associate Editors
Arts Editors
Books
Film
Music
Fine Arts
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Mike Gil
Andy Gottesman,
David Hyman, Eric Lemont,
Ryan Schreiber, Jeff Sheran
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Pete Shapiro
Elizabeth Lenhard
Mary Beth Barber

Order your college ring NOW
JO STENS
A M E R I C A S C O L L E G E R I N G"'
Stop by and see a Jostens representative,
Jan. 30 - Feb.1
11 m *r#A nm

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News: Chris Afendulis, Lar Barager, Jon Casden, Michele Clayton, Lynne Cahn, Brenda Dickinson, Julie Foster, Jay Garda,
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Photo:Brian Canton, Antony M. Croi, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Michele Guy, Rob KroenerL.
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