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January 28, 1991 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-01-28

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, January 28, 1991

Calvin and Hobbes

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by Judd Winick
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RALLY
Continued from page 1
arguments flew between the war
protesters carrying signs saying,
"Draft Quayle Now," and pro-Bush
demonstrators carrying posters of
the Vice President.
Mark Sarro, a demonstrator
supporting the Bush policy, said
he came to Washington to "speak
up for the 82 percent of America
that supports Bush and real peace."
Sarro, a resident of Fairfield, Con-
necticut, said peace would begin
with "a world without Saddam
Hussein."
As the protesters poured into
the Ellipse behind the White
House, speakers again came to the
platform.
Rev. Jesse Jackson criticized
President Bush for taking America
into the war. "The economic sanc-
tions were working... now we
have unleashed a fury. The price of
oil is going up; the price of blood
is going down."
After Rep. Charles Rangle (D-
N.Y.) finished addressing the
crowd, he said he called for nego-
tiation in Congress before the war
began. He said, "Now that we are
involved in the war, we should put
diplomacy on the table."
Rangle said he felt many peo-
ple were in support of the war be-
cause there haven't been any major
American casualties and because
"the press has been a rallying team
for the amazing electronic victory
we've been having."
President of National Organiza-
tion for Women Molly Yard said
while she feels most women sup-
port non-violent action, those who
choose to join the military should
be allowed to enter direct combat.
Right now, because they are not
legally allowed to be in combat,
they receive less money than men.
She said women should fight for
the right to engage in combat if
they so choose.
"We've got to pressure
Congress and the fact that there are
so many women (in the Persian
Gulf) who are doing a good job
will help the cause," she said.
Yard also said women should
be included in a draft. "We want
equal rights for women. We have
to be willing to accept equal re-
sponsibility."
Now that Saddam Hussein has
waged environmental war against

01

WASHINGTON
Continued from page 1
party anyway with hidden wineskins.
Anxious smokers break for posi-
tion as first off the bus when it
pauses to break.
At the rest area, talk abounds
'with expectations of the following
day.
Although first-year LSA and
dance student Alexandra Beller de-
-scribed her bus as "cramped, tight,
hot, and nauseating," she is eagerly
anticipating the rally and march on
Washington, D.C.
When some share rumors sur-
rounding the march, others react
with concern.
Many fear the possibility of skin-
heads crashing the march will
threaten their message.
After midnight, the ride begins
again, talk softens, and eventually

most fall into a slumber.
Ken James, a graduate student in
English, found solace on the floor of
the bus. Defending his niche, he
said, "I slept on the floor because it
was more comfortable than the seat."
Saturday morning, the Ann Arbor
entourage takes its place at RFK
Stadium amongst throngs of simi-
larly chartered buses arriving from
locales across the nation.
The trip's organizers establish 7
p.m. as the rendezvous time prior to
departure for the return trip.
Everyone has the day to accomplish
their mission.
Ten hours later, upon their return
to the buses, activists share experi-
ences.
The crowds posed problems for
those desiring to remain in groups
throughout the day. People were
easily separated.
LSA junior Gabriella Swenson

found it difficult to remain with her
group during the march. She said she
was not afraid for her safety despite
Washington's reputation as
America's murder capital.
"How are you going to feel afraid
of people carrying peace signs all
over the place?" Swenson explained.
LSA sophomore Chris Powers
reacted to counter-demonstrators car-
rying signs which read, "We support
our soldiers, don't you?"
"They don't understand that we do
support our soldiers, our friends, and
our relatives who are in the Gulf,"
Powers said. "And we want to save
their lives and the lives of everyone
tangled up in this evil war."
During the march, riot police pre-
pared themselves for violent inci-
dents.
Darcy Nuffer, a Residential
College sophomore expressed an
indignant attitude about the police's
appearance. "They were trying to in-
timidate us with tear gas guns and
helmets and bully clubs," she said.
Some University students seized
the opportunity to speed-walk
through the Smithsonian Institute.
First-year LSA student Wendy
Kaplan visited the National Gallery
of Art on her first trip to
Washington, D.C. "I finally got to
see what I've been reading about in
history books for so long," she said.
As the bus departed for the 12-
hour return to Ann Arbor, first-year
LSA student Andrea Heiss expressed
satisfaction with the one-day expedi-
tion.
"It was empowering to see thou-
sands of groups represented," she
said. "To be a part of it is something
I'll never forget."

An unidentified onlooker cheers on the mass of protesters marching on

p
S
S

Pennsylvania Avenue.
the Allies by causing what appears
to be the largest oil spill ever, the
environment was a topic of dis-
cussion.
Peter Bahouth, the executive
director of Greenpeace and acting
U.S. Trustee to Greenpeace Inter-
national said the oil spill has
caused people to be more active in
protesting the war. "It's become
one of the first visible aspects of
the war. They haven't seen dead
bodies, but they have seen dead
birds," Bahouth said.
He said Greenpeace was going
to be "pushing people to push en-
vironmental projects that will get
us off our dependency on oil as a
source of energy."
The protesters came from all
parts of the country with many
different cultural backgrounds.
Vietnam War Veteran Chip
Trojano said this war already has

many similarities to Vietnam. "I
can't stand to watch our generation
die like we were sent out to die,"
he said.
Bob Windham, a demonstrator
in support of U.S. intervention
from Greenbelt, Maryland said,
"This is not Vietnam. The objec-
tives of this war are clearly de-
fined." He said the objectives were
to "free Kuwait and destroy
Saddam."
A large group of Arab-Ameri-
cans marched together. Roger Harb
from Knoxville, Tennessee said
Arabs and Israelis should put aside-
their differences and fight together
for peace. "I feel bad when bombs
hit Tel-Aviv, I feel bad when they
hit Baghdad. I'm for peace."
The National Campaign for
Peace, a coalition of religious, la-
bor and human-rights groups, or-
ganized the rally..

NOR

690

DENTAL HEALTH DAY
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2
U OF M DENTAL SCHOOL
9:00 - 12:00 PM

FREE ORAL CANCER SCREENING
FREE X-RAYS
FREE DENTAL HEALTH EVALUATION
ALL AGES ARE WELCOME
ALL SERVICES ARE FREE
THE STUDENTS AND FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN WILL HOST THEIR ANNUAL DENTAL HEALTH DAY
PARKING IS AVAILABLE IN THE FLETCHER ST. PARKING LOT
THE SCHOOL IS LOCATED ON THE CORNER OF
N. UNIVERSITY AND FLETCHER ST.
PUBLIC MAY ENTER THROUGH ENTRANCE OFF NORTH
UNIVERSITY, OR ENTRANCE OFF FLETCHER ST.

GULF

Continued from page 1
540,000 Iraqi soldiers in and near oc-
cupied Kuwait.
Cheney announced U.S. forces
had taken military action to stop the
colossal oil spill in the northern
Persian Gulf that he blamed on Iraq.
The spill, part of which was re-

ported burning, threatened water
supplies in Saudi Arabia, where
most of the U.S. forces are based,
and could hinder an amphibious as-
sault on Kuwait, if the allies choose
to launch one.
U.S. military officials have said
Iraqis turned on pumps at a Kuwait
offshore oil loading facility and fed
the spill with five idle tankers hold-
ing a total of 125 million gallons of
crude oil.

Oil shipping and environmental
experts said the oil cannot be con-
tained because of the rough gulf wa-
ters, the size of the spill, and the
war.
As U.S. forces worked to staunch
the oil spill, coalition air forces toolc
advantage of clear skies over Iraq to
send wave after wave of warplanes
on more bombings sorties in the 11-
day-old war.

U OF M DENTAL SCHOOL

764-1516

T1

I

.-...---.-------------------------------------------
- I
FACULTY AND STAFF WOMEN AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN s
AGAINST THE GULF WAR
AS WOMEN WE VOICE OUR PROTEST: WAR CANNOT RESOLVE THE CONFLICT IN THE GULF NOR CONTRIBUTE TO
II
U.S. NATIONAL SECURITY. #
# THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT HAS ENTERED THIS WAR AND IT IS OUR RESPONSIBILITY AS THE PEOPLE OF
# THIS COUNTRY TO STOP IT.
WE ESPECIALLY REJECT A CULTURAL ARROGANCE WHICH PRESUMES THAT U.S. MILITARY INTERVENTION CAN 1
RESOLVE OR CONTROL WHAT ARE LONG-STANDING, COMPLEX PROBLEMS IN THE REGION.
THE MILITARY ACTION IS NOW BEING VISUALLY AND VERBALLY PRESENTED TO US IN A LANGUAGE OF SPORTS #
AND VIDEO GAMES. WHAT DO THESE IMAGES DO? THEY FOCUS OUR ATTENTION ON WARHEADS RATHER THAN 1
PEOPLE, MILITARY SITES RATHER THAN HOMES, STRATEGIES RATHER THAN NEGOTIATIONS. THIS WAR IS NOT A I
# GAME. ,THE DESTINIES OF THE PEOPLE IN THE GULF DO NOT BELONG TO BUSH AND HUSSEIN. I
THERE IS NO MORAL IMPERATIVE OF ECONOMIC NECESSITY FOR OUR MILITARY INVOLVEMENT. THE 1
DISRUPTION AND DISPLACEMENT OF COMMUNITIES IS NO CAUSE FOR "EUPHORIA". THE LONGER THE U.S.
GOVERNMENT REMAINS AT WAR, THE GREATER THE SOCIAL AND ECOLOGICAL DESTRUCTION AND POLITICAL
DESTABILIZATION OF THE REGION. THE TERROR OF THE WAR AND THE MEMORIES IT LEAVES WILL REMAIN#
I LONG AFTER ANY MILITARY CONCLUSION. #
I# IT IS NOT TOO LATE TO SEEK OTHER MEANS. THE EFFECTIVE USE OF SANCTIONS AND NEGOTIATIONS COULD
STILL OPEN THE POSSIBILITIES FOR A VIABLE SOLUTION. I
# WE REJECT THE PREMISE THAT THIS WAR COULD BE WON. IT WILL HAVE NO WINNERS. 1
[DRAFTED ON JANUARY 17,19911 I
1 Julia Adams Billie Edwards Anne Herrmann Sarah Mangelsdorf Catherine Shaw#
# Shafica Ahmed Frances Elliot Carol S. Hollenshead Hazel Markus Ellen Shannon#
# Donna Ainsworth Adve Bel Evans June Howard Alita Mitchell Linda Shepard
Hiroko Akiyama Deborah Fedon Diane Hughes Erin Moore Pat Simons#
Elizabeth Anderson Barbara Feldt Margarita D. Hurtado Eliana Moya-Raggio Patricia Simpson#
# Renee Anspach Leann Fields Huma Ibrahim Barbara Mvurphy Julie Skurski
# Frances A aricio Connie Flanagan Helen Isaacson Betsy Nisbet Barbara F. Sloat 1
Keletso Atkins Jessica Fo >l Barbara Israel Laura Nitzberg Sherri Smith I
Judith Becker Nancy Fot z Marne Jackson Gail Nomura . LindaSpriggs
# Ruth Behar Maril'yn Sibley Fries Toby Javaratne Jane Nye Domna Stanton
# Crisca Bierwert Alice Fulton - Emily Jessup Bernestine Oliver Julie Steiner
Linda M. Blum Robin Gaubarth Carol Thomas Johnson Helen Olson Abigail Stewart
#Audrey Baseman Susan Gelman Cristina Jose-Kampfner Esie Orb Ann Stoler
SGerri Brewer Ann Rugles Gere Noriko Kamachi Terri Orbuch Zulema Suarez
Karen Brock Brenda allespie Carol Karlsen Sherry Ortner Srila Subash
1Gail Brooks Fatima Mirge Gocek Susan W. Kaufmann Sonja Paigge Sharon Sutton
Celeste Brusati Jo Goodwkin Sharon Keigher SilviaPe aza Elizabeth Sweet
I Faye Burton Audrey Gomon Deborah Keller-Cohen Laura Perez Hitomi Tonomura
Maria Isabel Caballero Marguerite Grabarek Susan King-Harmon Michelle Perry Nelvia Van't Hul1
Kathleen Canning Debra Graddick Valerie Kivelson Holly Peters-Golden Martha Vicinus#
Nancy Cantor Cecilia A. Green Susanne Koesis Adefa Pinch Athena Vrettos#
I Barbara Carr Linda Gregerson Kris Kissman Andrea Press Susan E. Wagner
# Carol Ann Cater Maria Grosz-Ngate Ann E. Larimcre Mary Price Patricia F. Waller1
Barbara Cervenka Pamela Guenzel Dorothea Lt ; Esperanza Ramirez-Christiensen Vickie Wellman#
Gracia Clark Robin Guenzel Joanne Leon.a a Beverly Rathcke Christina Whitman
# Maria Comninou Patricia Gurin MargaretC. -.enstein Beth lover Reed Linda Willis

LAWYERS
Continued from page 1
Schluckebier's interest in eventu-
ally working for a large law firm.
"The speakers tended to down-
play the big firms, which I found
inexplicable. I think of big firm
work as involving big deals, the
kinds of large scale transactions
you don't see anywhere else," he
said.
Other students are looking be-
yond the big corporate law firms.
"I'd rather work for a smaller
plaintiffs' firm. I want to have time
to have a life," said first-year law

student Karen Libertiny.
One aspect of legal practice
which the programs have empha-
sized is the high demands many@
large law firms place on young at-
torneys. "Much of what the big
firms do involves terribly boring
work and horribly long hours,"
Carol Kanarek, head of the New
York outplacement firm of
Kanarek & Shaw, said.
Are first-year students panick-
ing about the job market they will
be facing? "I think they're basi-
cally resigned to it. I don't sense
people losing their equanimity,"
Schluckebier said.

~be~Iiboan Lg
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
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