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March 05, 1922 - Image 3

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SUNDAY, MARCH 5, 1922

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

The Double Dealer's Poetry
(By Lois Elisabeth Whitcomb) to say, and her versification is weak. Mr. Davidson's work is full of music, displays a cynical sympathy for frus-
Within the year there has appeared "Sun Ballet" is freely rimed, and and notably lacking in visual appeal. tration. The group of verses, "In
in "The Double Dealer" a remarkably' rapid in movement. It is thin stuff The lack of picture increases the de- Black and White," by William Alex-
large amount of good poetry The but sparkling. "The Railroad Station," light in his rhythmic phrasing. antler Percy, is in a similar mood.
. twenty-four lines of free verse, strikes "Inhibition" and "Ageless Woman" Percy's observation is perhaps as
elevei nunbers that I have examined the paradoxial modern note of con- are two powerful sonnets by Edgar acute as Bodenheim's, and his reaction
contained some poems of real beauty, scious naivete. She conveys, without Savage, the last one a beautiful and as strong, but he lacks perspective
many of unusual merit, and not more sentimentality, a sense of miracle. It forceful expression of the idea of rein- and technique. However, his work
than half a dozen that are positively is one of the finest peons that has carnation. "Electrocution," by Lola is packed with thought. If he masters
thnhalf.adoe thiatareositl appeared in the magazine. - Ridge, is striking in its intensity. Its his medium he will be one of the
inferior. Older publications might Babette Deutsch also is represented swiftness and dramatic vigor are not greater realistic writers.
well envy the record of this new "na- by three poems. "The Master," made mpeded by the stately sonnet measure. The issue for December, 1921, con-
tional magazine from the south." up of nine five-line stanzas, has an un- "Gothic," a sonnet by Jean Starr tains "Hlunger Inn," by Jessica Nelson
The editors have shown an interest- pleasantly stiff rhythm, but contains Untermeyer, which appeared in the North. It is a fresh and delightful
ing catholicity of taste in their ac- a few lines after the Swinburnian October "Double Dealer," is included handling of an old theme, the meter
ceptances. There is much free verse; manner: in Mrs. Untermeyer's new collection subtly patterned, the diction effective.
there are many sonnets. There are "And music is the pulse that dies of poems, "Dreams Out of Darkness." I quote the first of its four stanzas:
lyrics romantic, lyrics realistic. The And iot the dream that lingers" It is sufficiently high praise to say
work of such hela-known astthors as that it deserves a place in that vol- "Waiter, Waiter!
Lord Dunsany, Padriac Colum, Alfred "Measure" is an impressive quat- ume. The hour is late.
Kreymborg, John McClure and Louis rain, a revelation of emotional unrest Walter McClellan's two poems are Bring me love on a silver plate,
Untermeyer appears side by side with and oppression. "At Asahi," a frag- both excellent, "Unquiet," a chiseled Topped with green from the coolest
contributions from poets so new to ment of free verse, is memorable for and terrible lyric, and "Arrangement springs,
print that the ink is scarcely dry on the following lines: in Black and Gold," the first six lines Garnished with kisses in golden rings,
their names. "Twsin threads of smoke exceptionally vivid and full of atmos- Warmed with laughter and spiced with
John McClure has contributed more In dim blue aspiration rose and broke phere. The indeterminate charm of tears,
than any other poet. Of the thirteen And mingled from pur casual cigar- psiae Wi"liviok "iity of All yes.
of his verses printed in eleven is- ettes; piied ,n "Oblivion." "Spirit of All{ years.
sues of "The Double Dealer," "As Men As tho our souls should float from us Things" is in a more conventional
Turn Tailor" is perhaps the most char- and touch." vein. The two verses under the title 'We're just out of love, tonight,
"The Moon" are exquisitely delicate, Madam.'"
acteristic, eibodyiig as it does his The figure is one of distinctive the first having the fine clear outlines
conception of the practice of poesy. beauty, the phrasing simple and of a cameo, the second one being full The poem as a whole has a prankish
Others. such as "On an Intricate Fili- lovely. These lines alone are suffici- of motion and melody, pathos, a faintly wistful dignity, a
gree, Dives, and "There Comes No ent to mark Babette Deutsch as a true Among the more mundane verses Iuckery sweetness that is charming.
Caravan," acedleft and delicate and :artist. are two by Maxwell Bodenheim. It is in the first rank of the excellent
have a pretty thread of fantasy. "A Two sonnets by Gustav Davidson, "Dress-Model" is a shrewd and bitter poetical work which is one of the chief
Ballad of Worldly Wise" is a bit too "Sanctuary" and "Like Some North- comment on humanity. "Village-Clerk," attractions of "The Double Dealer."
reminiscent of an older ballade, but Coast Adventurer of Old," are earnest
"With All Their Vessels," although and full of feeling. Both contain
not novel in them, is translated in an lines of deep sounding melody, but the
original fashion. It is the sigh of a quality is not consistent. It seems al-
poet, wearied a little with his work, most incredible that there should oc- L aterd
aware of the futility of his pen, yet cur in the same poem ("Sanctuary") L atest V ictor Rd
Three poems by Jeanette Marks are "Beauty was all too frequent to be
interesting in their variety. "Queen's rare" N ow on Sale
Hair" relies for its appeal upon the and so beautiful a one as
ancient romance of Guenevere and "And from those perilous nights of
Lancelot. In it Miss Marks has little deep sea roaming."

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