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February 19, 1922 - Image 4

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4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1922

W ho Will Succeed Caruso?
(By T. E. D.) and received some new ideas and con- path of Muratore that he will find he bolt upright, rub their eyes, and ask
The successor to Caruso! Who will ceptions. must overcome. He is erraticand his tIhemselves what is the meaning of the
he be? Is he in this country or has Martinelli is facing this different au- very high notes are not good. On advent of these new men.
ie not been discovered yet? Or will dience and in the lack of that softer occasion he can do the best of work. When Beniamine Gigli came to New
tone lie may find the stumbling block But there are other nights when heYork le caused a sensation and when
there ever be a man who will fill the to his general acceptance as the great- is far fronbeing at his best, his voice ktario Chamlee caseioforth after a
place of Caruso with the people of the est of operatic tenors. seems to lack its fullness and posi- long struggle through all the steps
world? Those questions are occupying With McCormack it, is an entirely tiveness, and he falls short of his usual from oblivion to greatness, steps which
the center of musical thought in different matter. McCormack missed dramatic intensity. This can be for- included the San Carlo Grand Opera
America and the rest of the world - a dnone of the advantages of study and glenwhe it does to a n easio company and other organizations, the
has made the most of his voice. In Metropolitan Opera Co. showed us that
day, contrast to Martinelli he does his best Muratore has had too many "off we can now expect some more things
They are hard questions to answer work on the concert stage and will nights" to suit his friends. His high in opera singers.
and the wealth of material in the sing- >robably never become as popular as- notes offer another difficulty. Heinoraing ers,
ing world today makes it even harder {Martinelli in opera. It is hard to either uses a high falsetto which, when EuroieGi f isrepeated sucesses in
to get at anything like a conclusion. poifit out in just what phase MeCor- used properly, is entirely periiissable, Euroe, sugcess now mak sha
Such men as .Martinelli, McCormack, mack falls short of Martinelli, but he or has a quality in his high notes decidesuccalready e rk tsat him
Johnson, Lazaro, Muratore, and some does. iis voice is not so hig, nor has which does not shade down into his sanagers realready advertispg im
of the new singers have raised the it the brillance of his famous conthem lower notes. For Muratore uses his as ther"lea." te of th M li-
plane of singing excellence to such a porary. lMcCormack, however, must be high notes beautifully but when lvoice, sera." Ie haess all the uali-
position that to choose a "best" or accepted as a figure to be reckoned has to shade down gradually into his ieseeming opossessoalithe quali
"greatest" becomes a matter of split-, with, and an important factor in the middle voice the jump is quite notice- nie thetot, Metritan stars
ting hairs and treadin on the toes of musical world. able. "If It s a falsetto le uses h lacks. He has that soft tone Marti
half the people in the country to please must learn to break it more easily and
the other half, Last among the Metropolitan tenors if it is a natural voice he will have k, that brilliance MeCormack
is Lazaro, Ind he can hardly be given to learn to place it more nearly where lacks, and a passionate fervor in his
Among the oldest singers Martinelli more than a passing thought. His le does his middle voice, Fur if he dramatic passages and a masterly
seems to bid strongest and best for work is fine, and in his debut a few doesn't, he may find his greatness handliig of the purely legato passages
position at the top of the list, at least years ago he was hailed as one of the "reaching a definite, lamentable limit. that fascinate audiences every time he
he has, apparently, the most vociferous future world's greatest tenors. He . sings.
hepr.Psesngatn lota Johnson, the only other Chicago'
support. Possessing a tone almost as noy be one of the several greatest, rIn Chamlee America has a tenor,
brilliant as that of Caruso, and an art hut he will hardly ever be ranked tenor who is yet threatening to claims born and taught here, who can well
mature in its understanding and suave among the first few, it would seem highest honors, is, like Muratore, a fine stand on his own merits and say to all
and convincing in its sureness, he froin his present position., artist, and again like Muratore, the Europe that America is independent
reaches his greatest excellence in When we go to the Chicago Opera possessor of a voice of the purest of Europe for her training. Chamlee
opera. With the hot blood of-Italy in we find Johnson and Muratore stand- quality. Johnson does not seem to was taught in this country and attrib-
his veins and a naturally dramatic ing out as most promising. Muratore have the troubles Muratore has, but he utes his success to a San Francisco
temperament, his work often reaches has a bad habit or two which, it seems, also lacks an indefinable something teacher. Such a display of indepen-
such dramatic heights that it need may keep him from the throne of in his singing. ance and boldness in disclaiming all
not draw back in deference to Caruso's Caruso, but he is in a position to de- In our .new singers we find much influence of the old world reflects
greatest. As a concert singer lie hos mand very careful consideration. in that is highly attractife and some ele- much credit on Mr. Chamlee and sems
long been popular, although it is high- the first place he has a quality of ments which are making people sit (Continued on Page 8)
ly probable that were he merely a con- voice which is positively beautiful, and
cert singer,- he wouldt attract omuch lie is equal if not superior to eiteJ
less attention, for the demands of con- McCormack or Martinelli. And Murk-,
cert do not fit the equipment of Mar- tore is a real artist. His singing has
tinelli as do those of opera, a breadth of experience back of it
But times are changing, and with and a dramatic intensity that is of the
them voice methods and the fancies of best.
the music-loving public have grown Two obstacles offer a barrier in the

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