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October 16, 1955 - Image 9

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Sunday, October 16, 1955
Academy
Plan
STAFF includes people like Maija
Grotell, head of ceramics, a
top ceramist who is asked to ex-
hibit so often that she has to keep
a list to make sure that she doesn't
send the same pot to the same
place twice.
The deep appreciation of their
craft by instructors like Miss Gro-
tell is evident. When we came in,
she had a small square of clay in
her hands, fingering and smooth-
ing it as she talked to us.
And then there is Marianne
Strengell, head of weaving and
textiles, whose workshop as a a
splash of red and yellow yarns
and rich fabrics. Typical of Aca-
demy instructors she supplements
her class interests with her own
project-designing fabrics for au-
tomobile upholstery at the mom-
ent.
The first president of the Aca-
demy of Art was Saarinen. He
designed their buildings, and then
they asked him to head their staff.
It was Saarinen who broughtCarl
Milles to Cranbrook, the Swedish
sculptor who along with Saarinen
helped give Cranbrook its inter-
national reputation.
When Milles died in his home
at Milles Garten, Sweden last
month, the largest collection of
his sculpture outside his own coun-
try was located at Cranbrook.
Many of his major works were
commissioned in the huge studio
there which Saarinen built for
him, now divided into smaller work
shops.
Milles' famous "Orpheus" foun-
tain (cover picture) which is lo-
cated in Stockholm can also be
seen in recasting at Cranbrook.
Without the Orpheus, however-
exact duplication was not allow-
able. "European and the Bull," the
dramatic Explorer statue, "Jonah
and the Whale" and other Milles
bronzes aie a beautifiul comple-
ment to thse red and yllow fons
of the Cr i brook uildi"s.
THE PRESENT staff is up to the
stature of its predeessors.
Zoltan Sepesy, who took over as
Academy director when Milles left
in 1950, is a-well-known painter
whose oils are owned by most of
the major museums. He is a grad-
uate of the Royal Academy of Fine
Arts in Budapest, studied in Paris
and Vienna, and worked under
Milles at Cranbrook as head of the
painting department.
The international character of
the Academy's staff and its fine
reputation have attracted a great
many foreign students, with 13%
of the students corning from Cana-
da and abroad. Of four outstand-
ing scholarships awarded this year
three went to foreign students.
N 1942 the Academy was offi-
cially recognized as an institute
of higher learning when it was
chartered by the state and given
the power to grant degrees Ap-
plicants of 18 years of age who
are high school graduates or the
equivalent qualify to apply to
Cranbrook. Students are accept-
ed on the basis of their work and
the course of study they plan to
follow.
Three degrees are given at Cran-
brook: Bachelor of Fine Arts, Mas-
ter of Fine Arts, and Master of
Architecture. Non-degree students
are also accepted but enrollment
Is limited to 101.
A six-week summer session is
also included in the Academy pro-
gram, with courses abbreviated but
similar in content to the regular
curriculum.

THE ORIGINAL founders of
Cranbrook, Ellen Scripps Booth
and George G. Booth died a few
years ago, having done well by
Cranbrook. They saw the Meeting
House that they had erected in
1918 grow into a Foundation of
six independent institutions. Saar-
inen died in 1950, Milles died last
month-but capable people have
come to take their place.
Cranbrook now belongs to the
public.
PICTURES BY JOHN HIRTZEL
AND THE CRANBROOK PHOTO-
GRAPHIC DEPARTMENT.

D., ,. ,. h I ..,..

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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ACADEMY OF ART PAINTING STUDIOS

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