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October 16, 1955 - Image 8

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Page Eight

Educational Objectives
(Contimied from Page 7) of art-the e planned :mrom the
brook ventures, initiated in 1930. beginning'a a e creative 9
It was originally planned as a ability to riprn BF rnside, Kings-
supplement to the private school wood and Crarh k have all been
programs, but it ias soon evident formulated closely around the fine
that its facilities served a -ider arts.
need. Handsomely housed by Saar- When Saarinen, Carl Milles and
inen in its present hillside loca- other artists came to Cranbrook
tion in 1938, the Institute attracts in the late 1920's to design build-
large numbers of visitors daily and ings, an informal academy was A
Michigan school children comeI already underway. With this back-
over by the busload. ground, the formal establishment
Fulfilling its self-hmposed edu- of the Academy was assured.
cational objective, the Institute Academy buildings, designed un-
maintains traveling exhibits as der Saarinen's hand, are some of
well as the popular museum dis- the most impressive on the Cran-
plays. It conducts study groups, brook grounds. They are sur-
demonstrations and field trips, rounded by Milles sculpture, ter-
Original books and pamphlets are raced pools and elegant landscape.
circulated throughout the coun- The Academy is, needless to say,
try, and its publications even reach the object of much photographic
an international audience. activity.
A fine library, an observatory, The educational atmosphere of
an auditorium, laboratories, class- the Academy, however, is what
rooms and a lapidary shop with means the most, and it more than
devices for cutting and polishing matches the setting. Students and
stones round out the list of Insti- teachers work together under the
tute resources. most natural conditions. They
This year it celebrates its 25th are people with common interests,
anniversary by opening the first rather than instructors and pu- t
public planetarium in the state, pils,
named after Prof. Robert R. Mc-
Math of the astronomy debartment The Academy idea was to have
who has served as a trustee of the each instructor as "a practicing
Institute since its outset. artist whose continuing growth in
his own art would help him stimu- 4
R UT PERHAPS the institute that late and advise his students"-
best sums up Cranbrook is the and the idea has been eminently
Academy of Art. -In a sense, the successful.
entire Foundation is an academy See ACADEMY, Page 9

EMTION OF THE 1955 CRANBROOK ACADEMY OF ART STUDENT'S SHOW: now on tour of
colleges and universities in the South and Midwest.
Academy
Projects

XAIX.I'e I O TiE WORK 0F MAIA GROTELL-inter-
0t ioni "' own it r and head of the ceramie doeartment of
rew-Ni\Tck Sweateir
WILDS
c
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2gCi NY LON ( for Rug-ced Siren gth)
hA AD-F ASJH O ED . . . H AND W ASH ABLEfJ
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0i
10.95
S!MALL SIZES FOR GIRLS
cWID'SL
r t t C
201 to YO r Rugged tenCgth)

There is ortly 05ne Gencuine, Origintal
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10% FOR MEN AND WOMEN
10%Heavy weight all-wool ,. . lined throughout
with collar and detaChable hood
$25.00
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BRITISH IMPORTS
TAILORS CLOTHIERS FURNISHERS
1119 South University Phone: NO 3-1920

4

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