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August 18, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-18

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 1921. PRII

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,

CUT

ROAD FUND,
IS LODGE PLE A

i '
PROF. DAVID FRIDAY, OF THE
ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT, WHO
WILL SUCCEED DR. J(EDZIE.
BKR DUS I
ELCRO HER

ks Also of Disintegration
Iradlum Into Alpha and Beta
Particles

of

PRINCIPLES EXPLAIN
CHEMICAL COMBINATIONS
recent visitor to the United
, Mme. Curie, has aroused our,
it about the structure of mat-
particularly the structure and
of radium," said Dr. E. F. Bar-.
n his lecture, "Modern Theories
ftter," given at 5 o'clock yester-
.fternoon in the Natural Science
)rium.
told of the principal actions of
m, and then showed that all mat-
as supposed to be made up in
the, same way. To this end, he
ated the electron theory'
Disintegration of Radium
lium breaks up or disintegrates
ivisible particles known as alpha-
>eta-particles, respectively. The
-r develop a speed of 12,000 miles
second, and the latter 180,000
per second. One hundred and
five trillion of alpha- and 71
n of beta-particles are evolved
second from one gram of radium.
abination of the two forms what
own as helium gas, which is an
ly different compound from ra-
In the same way, there is a
)ility for transmutation of al'l
nts, not even countenanced until
tly, he said.
radium particles hajye been
to posses the power to pene-f
solids, another feature not given
nee until lately. It .has also
proved that the particles encoun-
no resistance while passing
.gh the solid. "When collisions
ke place they must be between'
small particles," said Dr. Barker.
nuclei, very small parts of the
, have all the penetrating power.
e there is no such thing as im-
rable matter, for all matter is

Says ligltway Reducti n One Way to
' ~Lmit Expenditures
Washington, Aug. 18.-A plea for
economy by Senator Lodge, Republican
leader, marked senate consideration
Wednesday of the federal aid good
roads bill.
"We must reduce government ex-
penditures," he said, -'and road im-
provement is one field where there
can be delay without serious injury.
"The great need of employment can
be met effectively in only one way,
and that is by a general revival of
business, to which all our efforts
should be directed," he said.
It is Senator Lodge's opinion that,
with the reduction in army and navy
appropriations, the -United States can
well afford to limit highway expendi-
,tures also, in oder to promote gov-
ernment economy.
:Whimsies Plans
E ssay Contest
Whimsies, Michigan's purely literary
magazine, will start its second year
with the November issue, and will be
Issued bi-monthly thereafter during
the coming college year.
The publication began last.year a
a mimeographed perpdical, issued
anonymously, and was distributed free
of charge among certain members of
the faculty. Its third number came
out in magazine makeu, and by way
of being something different was de-
voted exclusively to verse, in an effort
to show just how much work was be-
ing done in this fied."
This coming year the magazine will
continue its effort to present the best
in student writing. Material which Is
publishable elsewhere' will be given
protection by the copyrighting of each
issue. Verse, essays, one-act plays,
short stories that are different will
fill its pages. Since Whimsies aims
to be a representative abroad of stu-
dent' Michigan, student efforts only
will be actively solicited.
A distinctive feature ofWhimsies is
that it does not carry any advertising
matter.
The directors of the publication are
planning an essay contest to be held
early in the fall. The best essays sub-
mitted will be given a prominent place
in an early issue of the magazine.
IMMEL'S PUPILS
GIVE EFFECTIVE
READING PROGRAM
Students of the class in interpreta-
tive reading, under the direction of
Prof. Ray K. Immel, of the public
speaking department, presented a
number of reading in a program of
widely varied character at their pub-
lic exhibition given Tuesday evening
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
"When Melinda Sings,", one of the
better known of Paul Dunbar's pic-
tures of negro life, was given by Miss
Skinner, and was followed by a few
measures from an old negro spiritu-
elle, "Swing )Tow, Sweet Chariot."
The second number- a reading of
Edwin Markham's "Lincoln," by Ed-
ward Gerlach, was done in an effective
manner. Following this were two se-
lections, "Enoch Arden," and James
Whitcomb Riley's "Out to Old Aunt
Mary's," given by Miss Ward and Miss
DeWitt, respectively.
Four numbers from Kipling, read

by Miss Leonard, Miss Cobb, Miss
McCall, and Mr. Scott, were well re-
ceived by the audience,
The concluding number on the pro-
gram consisted of two old but popu-
lar readings, Henley's "Invictus," and
Robert Louis Stevenson's "Requiem,'
given by Miss Troester.

WCJOURNALISM DEPT.
UPWITHLEADERS
EXPAXi\SION OF CURRICUTLUMI IS
ARANGED FOR FALL
SEIESTER
BURROUGHS AND HAINES
ARE ADDED TU STAF F
Freshmen Will be Allowed to Enroll
and May Attend Press Club
Meetings
"With the addition of 6 new courses,
making a total of 12 and aggregating
35 hours credit, and an increase of
two in the personnel, the Journalism
department of the University will ran
among the foremost in this.country,"
stated Prof. John L. Brumm, head of
the Journalism department, yesterday.
The announcement now on the press
specifies the requirements for the
journalism certificate awarded to those
studsents maintaining the necessary
scholastic standing and completing
one of the five curricula leading to a
degree. -
Electives Included
"A minimum 'of 18 hours work in
this department, a maximum of 21
hours. and electives aggregating some
14 hours furnish more academic work
in journalism than is offered in any
other college," Prof. Brumm continued.
"Instruction in typesetting and kin-
dred pursuits are left for the trade
sihnool."
Edwin Burroughs, a graduate of
Cornell -"university and late of the
Springfield Republican and Boston
Transcript, and Donal Hamilton
Haines, '0, novelist and \short story
writer, constitute the increase in per-
sonny'. Mr. Haines has ai fellowship
in journalism and becomes a teaching
assistant, specialxing in feature and
magazine writing.
"Working with students in a uni-
versity atmosphere may furnish an in-
centive for more writing," remarked
Professor Brumm in speaking of Mr.
Hanes' desire to make Ann Arbor his
home. Ben W. Lewis, '22, a reading
assstant, will have charge of the Jour-
nalism files.
Prominent Journalists Will Speak
"Enrollment of freshmen in the de-
partment will be an innovation," add-
ed Professor Brumm. "Th'ey will be
eligible for meetings of the Press club.
Promjnent men. in thenewspaper
world have been secured to address
the club. "
Two days before the Ohio State-
Michigan football game, October 22,
the third annul. convention of the
Press Club of Michigan will meet at
the Union. At this time the editors
and publishers of the state, and such
students as are interested, will hear
leading journalists discuss important
problems of the profession.

EDWARD H.
MANAGER
DROWNED
DAY,

BAL[KAN PROBLEM
~STILL .UNSETTLED
-PROF. FRAYER.
History Professor Says Presence of}
Turks is Cause of the
-Difficuity
REVIEWS SITUATION WHICH
GREW 101T OF WORLD WAR

PRIEHS, '22, BUSINESS
ELECT OF THE DAILY,
NEAR SAGINAW MON-

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E~R.PRIEHS5
DROWNS STR
TO RESCUE S
BECOIWES ENTAGLED I
WHILE SWIMMING
HELP
WAS BUSINESS MA:
FELECT FOR '21-'2
Body Recovered After Haly
Funeral in Mt.,Clem
Tomorrow

"The Balkan situqtion remains justt
as unsettled as it ever was," declared 1
Prof. W. A. Frayer, of the history de-
partment, in his lecture on "The Un-
solved Balkan Problem," given at 51
'clock Tuesday afternoon in the audi-J
torium of the Natural Science building.
"The problem of the Balkans is cre-I
ited by the presence of the Turks in
southeastern Europe," said Professor)
Prayer. "Russia, Greece, Bulgaria,
Roumania, Serbia, and Austria-Hun-.
gary are tie countries mainly involvedh
n the matter. Whoever controls thet
straits, the Dardanelles, and the Sea
f Marmora has the key to the outlet
of Russia, and so Russia's policy is;
reasonable.
Austrian Sittiation Different 1
"Austria's situation is different.
Bismarck told the Austrians to face
south, and they have been doing so
ever since. Since Bismarck's retire-
ment they have had the concealed am-
bition to own the Balkans. The Greeks
are ,the most interested, as they have
always considerfd Byzantium to be
the center of Greater Hellas, and their
recent national spirit has made them
wrant it back."
Professor Frayer then gave a few
facts relative to the geographical na-
ture of the country and concerning the
people 'themselves. He said that the
people belonged to the' nations they
wished to belong to. "All the careful
measurements of cephalic indices in
the world will not determine race. It
is a matter of co-operation," he de-
clared.
Each Desires Macedonia
"Greece, Bulgaria, Roumania and'
Serbia have their own literatures and
are more and more coming to realize
their nationality, and as a consequence
resent the intrusion of the Turks more
each day," said Professor . Frayer.
"After 500 years of submission to the
Turk, Greece broke free in 1821. Bul-
garia became autonomous in 1805 and
free in 1908. The nain Balkan trou-
ble seems to lie in the fact that each
of' the nations d'esires possession of
Macedonia. They have spread much
propaganda to this end, but have
achieved little."
In 1912 came the war between Tur-
key and Italy over Tripoli. The Bal-
kan peoples, saw their chance and
took 'it. The Powers objected, but the
Balkan states paid' no attention, and
succeeded in forcing their way as far,
as the gates of Constantinople. Here
the matterended, for the states would
(Continued on'Page. Four)

Edward R. Priehs, '22, t
manager of next year's M
Daily, was drowned Monday af
in a lake a short distance fron:
win, a summer resort near Si
Priehs was swimming to shore
cure aid for his sister who w,
;oat which was filling with
le became entangled in the
about 20 feet from shore and
ed in water which was scarc
inches over his head.
Priehs, with his sister anid
ber of other friends, had lef
home in Mt. Clemens fo1- a v
and were enroute to Saginavv
they stopped at Gladwin. .Whil
they decided to fish in the lak
by. Starting out in a water
boat, the party noticed after
time that the boat began to fill
with water.
Drowns in Six Feet of Wa
In an effort to save' his sisi
other girl friends with them,
Jumped out and started foi
where he expected to find aid
this way to save the whole
When about 20 feet from the s
became entangled in the wee(
sank in water which was har
feet deep. His sister and the
members of the party who sta
the boat were saved before
completely filled with w ter.
His body was recovere~ witi
an hour, but physicians failed
vive him after working more t
hour and a half. The funeral
held at 1:30 o'clocl tomorrow
noon at the' Priehs home In Mt
ens. Interment will be made
city.
On Daily Bnsiness Staff
Priehs, 'who was better kn<4
"Eddie" around The Daily' ofli
(Continued on Page Foul
CLAS RESENTS PLI
BY1KNNED TO)
CAST FOR "THE SERVANT I
11OUSE" TRAINED BY PRI
HOLLISTER -

lains Electron Theory
ker went on to tell of the,
theory. According to this
atter is composed of atoms,
in turn made up of a cen-
us with subsidiary particles'
electrons, not unlike thel
its planets.
roblem remains not only as
lectronls are arranged, but
their configurations and mo-
continued, adding that there
chools of belief in regard to
one believing that the elec-
fixed in rings and the other
are in constant motion in
oth schools have found their
useful in explaining many
phenomena hitherto obscure.
e Chemical Combination
supposed that if the atorns
their full share of electrons
1 or borrow them from some
>pound; hence chemical coin-
ntinued on Page ~Four)

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GUN AND BLADE COMPLETES
PLANS FOR VETERAN CA) P
All members of Gun and Blade ares
urged by L. F. Donaldson; '23, acting
president, to attend the meeting which]
will be held at 7:30 o'clock tonight int
room 308 of the Union, for the consid-1
eration of several important matters
which will be brought to the attention
of the organization.
Plans are to be made for a banquet
which will take place at the opening
of the fall term on the occasion of
the installation of the 'new officers.
In addition,, final arange'nents for the
trip to the veterans' vacation camp at
FeFortSheridan will be presented at the
meeting.

"The Servant in the House
Charles Rann Kennedy, which
presented in Ann Arbor by the
Miller players some years ago; w
given at 8 o'clock tonight in
Caswell Angell hall by a cast
posed of members of the class j;
production under the directio
Prof. R. D. T.. Hollister, of the
speaking department.
The part of the Bishop of Lanc
will be taken by E. R. Baxter
Marion Franklin Stowe will pi
part of Martha; D. S. Swift w
the Vicar; Lotta May Martin wi
the part of Mary; Francis Brow
be seen as the page-boy; Georg
ner, of the department of
speaking, will re-enact the role
drain-man; and Harold B. Lipsi
take the character of Manson, th
evolent butler.
The performance will begin p
ly at 8 o'clock. An orchestra
posed of Summer session studen
play the oterture. Tickets are
at Wahr's bookstore, for 50 a
cents.

s are
they
ts. B(
ries
nical

_

- _..
---.--r

_

CHARLES RAND KENNEDY'S MASTERPIECE

TOM

Servant

In

T'he

House

by a select cast under direction of Professor Hollister
iGELL HALL ADMISSION 50

and 75

-o

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