100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 13, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

to

the most

4

R A H Ar
T W O COL L

iternoons.
I Street.

ept Saturday.
ed, the signatures
s an evidence of
a The Wolverine
:o the office.-,
>nsideration. No

endorse the

ex-

ITORIAL, STAFF
phone 2414 or 783
. Managing Editor
SUF, EDITORS
n John P. Da'wson, Jr.
....Hugh W. Hitchcock
....James B. Young
.Harry B. Grundy
.Virginia V. Tryon
..Clement Smith

Eleanor Miller

ESS STAFF
Le 960 or 374
.................Business Manager
[STANTS
Don Allen
nsend Wolfe

AUGUST 13, 1921.

J. P. DAWSON, JR.
RTER ADAMS
the news regarding the
Carter Adams, for many
tics department of the Un-
of loss as to how, ade-
appreciation of what his
rn, for help, therefore, to
known Professor Adams,
is more capable of giving

- his public lec-
ollett," onThurs-
ley, of the philos-
impropriety were
rloss suffered by
ail to express, es-
leagues, our sense
t, by the death, this
kdams, the leader,
it of economics.
reached the ap-
ough we were no
the improvement
: to the magnitude

all our opportunities.
The summer school idea is growing with very
great rapidity, and we believe the ye'ar-'round. idea
of education will come nore and more into vogue in
the near future. To attempt to keep pace with the
trend of the times, is only to show a moderate de-
gree of activity. We feel that, eventually, the plan
of summer intercollegiates will come definitely into
being and will become a big part of our summer
college life. Would it not be well for us to begin
consideration of the plan now?
PATRONIZE THE TAP ROOM
Although it is hard to say definitely whether, as
it has been charged, State street confectioners are
really being unfair in the prices asked at their shops,
nevertheless, it certainly is true that a comparison of
their rates with those of the soda bar in the Mich-.
igan Union tap room largely favor the latter. The
Union serves as large or larger dishes than do most'
dealers, uses as good or better materials in their
preparation, and investigations have proved them
to be 'rather unusually careful in the matter of
cleasing their dishes.'
On the whole, we believe the Union to be quite
fair in its charges, considering the quality of the
service. Moreover, the Union is a students' or-
ganization, and, as such, deserves support from its
members in preference to outside dealers.
We talk much of a boycott on local soda Cher-
chants. Perhaps, however, a mere shifting of our
trade to the tap room bar, which is essentially de-
signed for our personal use, would have the same
effect. We know the kind of service we cean get at
the Union, and The Wolverine, at least, is of the
opinion that efforts are being made at the bar to
give full value for money receivsed.
Convicted of stealing automobile supplie, five
young men in Washington are under sentence to at-
tend church regularly for one year. A terrible pen-
alty, if we may judge by the number hereabouts who
regularly avoid the sanctuary.
"Groesbeck favors prison for women,. snickers
a news head. Well, maybe the governor is right.
The Detroit News runs a "Daily Thought" col-
umn. Just our caliber exactly-one a day.
Is it 'true that 'cemnent sidewalks are really such1
painful things to walk upon ?
p a n u th n s t w a k u oHo w a b o u t p la c in g a j u d g e s ' s ta n d a n d tim e k e e p -
er atSouth U. and State?;
err
Others ' Opinions
DISAPPEARING COUNTRY DOCTORS
(The Detroit Free Press)
What Dr. Hugh Cabot, dean of the medical facul-
ty at the University, had to say in an interview in,
The Free Press about the practice of medicine in the
country is generally known in a vague way, but
Dr. Cabot puts the problem very clearly.
He says, in effect, that rural communities are not
getting the medical attendance they ought .to have
because medical schools train physicians who can-
not and will not work under the conditions which
confront the country doctor. The student learns
enact methods of diagnosis but to apply them he
needs the help of specialists in well equipped labor-
atories and these he cannot find in the country. If+
it is suggested that the student be trained to do his
own laboratory work the medical school will reply
that the field of medicine has become so broad and
complicated that it is simply impossible for the med-
ical practitioner to learn all that needs to be known
in order to treat the sick intelligently.
That makes a sufficient defense for the medical
school but does not improve conditions itn the
country where, as bir. Cabot points out, the average
age of doctors is something like sixty years. The
old men who established themselves in the country
when medical practice was a simpler matter than it
,is now are staying, but young men are not taking

their places. The result must be a gradual aggrava-
tion of the dearth of country doctors.
There are certain facts which tend to offset this
evil. Transportation is much easier now than it was
when those 6o-year old doctors were 25. Country
people can reach city centers much more easily
than they used to, thanks to electric lines, good
roads and motor cars, and there are more centers
where expert medical advice is to be had than there
were in the past. These ameliorations will
increase with the growth of population but that
process alone cannot be depended upon to cure tlie
trouble which Dr. Cabot points out. Dying people
in remote country districts cannot wait for any such
tardy improvement.
The obvious 'remedy is to make conditions in the
country suitable for the modern doctor and'that is
being done to some extent through boards of health,
county hospitals and otherwise in various parts of
the country. Ann Arbor is not so large a city that
it would naturally be a medical center, but no phy-
sician would hestitate to open an office. in the vicinity
of Ann Arbor for the University supplies a hospital
and all the expert help any general practitioner
needs. All of the states have institutions aside from
medical schools which might be extended by the ad-
dition of laboratories to which country doctors in the
neighborhood could turn for help. Counties might
be authorized to fill this want but, whatever is done,
the effective impulse must come from the country
itself. Let the farmers make up their minds that'

'I

4;

Daily Program
Allgust iS
5 p. ni.-A Broader Field for Teach-
ers and Teaching, Paxticularly in In-
dustrial Education, Mr. K. E. Smith,
state supervisor of Industrial Edu-
cation.
August 16
5 p. m.-The 'Unsolved Balkaa
Problem, Prof. W. A. Frayer.
8 p. m. - Miscellaneous Readings.
The Class in Interpretative Reading
(Sarah Caswell Angell hall).
August 17
1 p. m.-Modern Theories of Mat-
ter (illustrated) with slides and mod-
els), Dr. E. J7. Barker.
8 p. m.-Educational) motion pic-
tures.
August 18
5 p, m.-The Platoon School, Mr.
C. L. Spain, deputy superintendent of
schools, Detroit.
8 p. m.-Kennedy's "The Servant in
the House", the class in play produc-
tlon,' under the direction of Prof. R.
D. T. Hollister. Admission will be.
charged (Sarah Caswell Angell hall).
Subscribe to the Wolverine.
+rg buys a brand
--new Corona
portable type -
writer. Other makes
at attractive prices.
Bee us before you buy.
TYPEWRITERS
of leading makes bought, sold,
rented, exchanged, cleaned and
repaired.
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade
Have You I

,

w
Silver and, Gold

ATERMAN, CONKLIN
SWAN

0

LVERSHA RP

P'ent

:11 FYNE POINT
ALARM CLOCKS
Hailer & Fuller
State SreetJewlers

K

A

A

WHITE SWAN LAUNDRY

FOR QUALITY AND SERVICF

D

Both ]
D)Iali

Our methods and machinery are up-to-date in every detail. The result is better work
with less wear to the fabric. we cater especially to the student trade. One day service
on re'quest TRY US.

H. G. Prettyman

PHONE 165

W. B. Gray,

I

1
t. -

I

The Ideal Hot Weather Food

I

it

I,

9-

013-

IC

14REAM

Preferred By Students and
Trowns-people

S T O

Tried Our

40ME COOKING

I

I

TEET'S

VsTake a

real
Ever,

a small com-
ute of the in-
e of us would
Mr. Adams

g ability was rendered
n, and by the consider-
es only from Nature's
s a gap which the Un-
fill with difficulty, if
gap which his friends
)ect to fill."

TS
ointed head

805 East Huron Street
Courteous. and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Sayings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources .........$5,000,000.00
707 North University Ave.
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
For Home-Cooked Meals
TRY TUTTLES
On Maynard Street, 1-2 Block South
of Majesic Theatre
FAILINGS'
,,DINING ROOMS
$7.00 per Week-3 Meals
$6.00 per ,Week-2 Meals
HOME COOKING
Electric Fans
Cool, Ventilated Rooms
714 MONROE STREET
East of Cutting's Flats
Summer School
v Students

I

TALI52

mm

with You
Photography the Kodak way is less expensive
than you think-and any Kodak is simple to
work-we can readilyshow you how easy it is.
Autographic Kodaks from $8.oo up
. rolvnies $2.00 up

,.,

I

.i
-- ...

r11 fm

1905

'ly better acquainted with
yon else, expressed him-
ng ago as being in favor
uguration of a system of
giate contests among the
req. Apparently, Coach
be not only a good thing
and for the spirit of the
ild be a great aid to the
ring schools as well.
:o have Coach Yost look
for undoubtedly his opin-
g to do with Wolverine
than that of anyone else
able attitude, on his part
nen prominent in Confer-
:over, would do much to
ritercollegiates idea on a
ties would be able to pick
eme, of course, from the
y. Undoubtedly, too, it
>position to send athletes
keep teams training for
e games during the--short
er session. Nevertheless,
ntially is a sound one.
s prompted in the first
up with the times, and
>me day the spirit of the
)me as fine and as enthus-
vthinf the winter tern-s

/-- __
Daily Service
Big Steae
ePut-In-Bay
Capacity 3270 Passengers

Finest exclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest Ball oO
Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra charge for danc- 0
ing. Steamers leave on Eastern Time.
Every day from Detroit at 9:00 a. m. for
Put-In-Bay-Connecting with Cleveland and
Buffalo Transit Co., and Steamer Arrw for
Middle Bass, "Kelley's Island & Lakeside.
Sandusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines, Fare, $1.50
Cedar Point-15 min. byferryfromSandusky,.Fare includingferry, 1.75
Excursion fares, (returning same day
Put-In-Bays week day, 90c; Sundays, Holidays, $1.25 Round trip.
Sandusky. evey day, $2.00 Round trip.
Four hours at Put-In-Bay; Bathing, visit the Caves, Perry's Monument.
Pavilion, Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several Hotels.
Cedar Point-Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels, Board Walk,
Thousands bathe here daily,
Returning Leave Cedar Point by Ferry for Sandusky. Leave Snodusky
from Big Four Dock 2.30 p. m. Put-in-Bay 4:30 p.mi. Arr. in Detroit 8:00 p. m.
Dancing Moonwights, Leave' Ashley & Dustin Stea:ner Line
Detroit 8.45 p.m. FareWed.,
& Thur. 60c Sat, & Sun. 75c. Foot of First St. Detroit. Mich.
Write for map folder

l

for

Fountain Refreshments
and Fine Candies
- visit
The 1etsy Ross Shop
The Fountain Room Beautiful

.. ,
( " ,. "' "' :-~- ; mow

13-15 Aickle'sArcade

t

-'

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan