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August 13, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-13

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 1921.

PRICEF$l

PLAY PRODUCING
CLASS PRESENTS
ONE-ACT DRAMAS
(By D. M.)
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister's class in
play production exhibited three one-
I abt plays, Lady Gregory's "Workhouse
Ward," Alice Gerstenberg's "Over
S tones," and George Middleton's "Tra-
dition," yesterday afternoon in the
Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
Taking into consideration all the ob-
stacles which presented themselves,
the work was admirably done. The
entire' absence of scenery and proper-
ties of any kind and the lack of cos-
r tumes made the success of the plays
entirely dependent on the acting, and
for an amateur presentation-the per-
formance was truly creditable.
Lady' Gregory's "The Workhouse
o Ward," is written around two old men
who have come to spend their few re-
maining days in the workhouse. They
are forced to' pass all of their time in
bed, and occupy themselves with lively
harangue, telling each other what pol-
troons they were in former days. A
countrywoman comes with the offer
e to take one of the men to her home,
but he will not leave unless the other
old man can go with him. She leaves
and the wordy battle between the pau-
pers starts afresh, ending in a pillow
(Continued on Page Four)
4 OFFICIA .NNERSIT
"RIFLE TEAM PPOINTED

HENR-Y C. ADAMS, FOUNDER
AND NEAD OF DEATNTI
POLITICAL ECONOMY, DIES K

PROF. HENRY CARTER ADAMS, FOR THIRTY - THREE YEARS THE
sHEAD OF THE ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT, WHO DIED THURSDAY
MORNING IN ANN ARBOR..

STUDENTS U,0,0 PHOLDS
Opinions Secured by Reporter A're Un-
animous in Support of Unioji
+ Policy :
MANY REFUSE TO PURCHASE
SODAS ON STATE STREETI

SMOLLE[TT'S I WORK,
-PROF. WENLEY.
Head of Philosophy Department Says
f Students Will Later Revert to
Older Writings
DECLARES PROVERBIAL IDEA
OF HIS CHARACTER IS FALSE

UAD OF FIGHT
ED IN GENEBAL

IS When a Wolverine reporter made "The novel is still young. Perhaps

,/

Selection of the eight men that will
composed Michigan's quota at the Na-
tional Rifle matches to be held' in
Ohio Aug. 27 to Sept. 22 has been made
by the University R. O. T. C., and a
general order has been received from
the adjutant-general appointing the
men- officially.
The following are the University of.
Michigan men: C. E. Wilson, '23E; J.
D. Lowry, '22; Robert Moore, '23; J.
D. Glunt, '23; J. E. Good, '23E; L. R.
Gillis, '22E; A. H. Robins, '23, and J.'
B. Vlack, '23E. From these will be
selected the team which will take part
in the intercollegiate matches.
Prof. C. E., Wilson, the captain of
the Michigan' squad, is of the opinion
that the team will place among the
"gold medals," as the 10 first teams
are termed.
PLAN TO COMBINE
DANCE ORCHESTRAS)

. I

'he Union this coming year is plan-
y ning a combination of all campus or-
chestras, according to Earl B. Mc-
t Kinley, '22M, the formulator of the
plan, which'includes the payment of
of a flate rate of two dollars. per hour
to all musicians consenting to abide
by the rules. All money collected over
and above the amount necessary to pay
t the musicians will be pooled, and later
divided among the men in proportion
to the hours they have played.
The exponents of the scheme claim
that in this way the musicians will
become the best paid workers on the
campus, and that the campus societies
and clubs will be able to secure the
best orchestras without paying un-
d reasonable- rates. During the past
y year, some orchestras obtained as
' high as $15 a piece, according to Mc-
e Kinley.
QUN AND BLADE MEETING"
ARRANGES VETERANS' CAMP
e
. Plans for the veterans' vacation
camp at CampSheridan occupied the
~ most of the discussion at the regularj
I meeting of the Gun and Blade club,;
d Thursday evening.
_e TAfter the regular procedure of
t business, L. F. Dawson, acting presi-
dent of the club, explained in detail
- the arrangements for transportation
to the camp as set forth by the social
n director who visited Ann Arbor Tues-
d day. The men will leave Ann Arbor
for the camp Aug. 27 by special train,
.t and return Sept. 15.

his customary questioning rounds Fri-
day, this time with a new query on<
his lips, "What do, you think of' the,
Union tap room as compared to State.
street?" it did not take long to con-
vince him that the tap room should do
a rousing business if all the students
held to their apparent convictions that#
the soda bar there was far more rea.-
sonable in price than regular campus
dealers, and hence deserved patronage.
The questioner was all ears; thea
questionees emphatic. A few of the
answers received are given here, as
follows:
Always Goes to Union
Thomas H. Spain, '22E: "Whenever
I do any soda buying, I go to the Un-1
ion. You can much better dishes_
down there. I never could.understand
why anycne would go down on State
street and pay 20 to 28 cents for a°
glass of slop when they could get
good dishes at the tap room for 15
cents. I don't regard sodas as neces-
sities, however, and I very seldom buy
any of them anyhow."
F. D. Webb, '21: "t not only think{
the prices are too high, but I notice
that there is a considerable variation
in price among the various stores
around town. If .one Th giving |aI
square deal, all the rest aren't. And#
the Union is just about the lowest
of the bunch in price and the highest
in quality."
W. W. Gower, '22: "In two years I
haven't gone into a store on State
street,to buy'a soda or sundae. When
I want anything of that sort I always
go to .the Union where I can get
something for my money."
Would Have Gone to Union
Milburn Kusterer, '21: "On account
of the high cost 'of sodas I haven't
been able to buy one all summer. If I
had, however, I'd have gone to the tap
room. I don't mind saying that spare
cash is too scarce to be wasted on
State street confectioneries, especi-
ally when you can get better stuff
at more reasonable prices in the Un-
ion."w
George A. Schuster, '21: "The tap
room is much less pf a strain on the,
pocketbook than the State street soft
drink parlors. Henceforth, the Union
shall have my patronage. I hope the
rest miss me." ,.
WESLEYAN GUIL)D MOCK TRIAL
ENS IN AMUSING CLIMAX

when it grows a little older, students
'at last will revert to its originators.{
When this happens Smollett will be
rediscovered inevitably, to receive his
due," said Prof. Robert M. Wenley, of
the philosophy department, in his lec-
ture on "The Bicentenary/of Smollett,"f
at 5 o'clock Thursday afternoon in the
Natural Science auditorium. "With all
'his faults and his unusual tempera-t
ment, it'remains unquestioned that he1
was one of the three or four creators
of modern literature's most charac-
teristic medium."
Born near Bonhill, Scotland, Smoll-
ett at an early age, was forced to sup-
port his family after the leath of his-
father. This -life, however, was too
mild for the impetuous Smollett and,
at the age of 16, armed with a tragedy
--the infamous "Regicide"-and some
letters of introduction, he entered
London. Cold-shouldered in London
and literally on his uppers he became1
a surgeon's mate on one of the 16 ships
then leaving England on a nefarioust
expedit4on. It was during this expedi-
tion that Smollett saw the credulity of
the soldiers and sailors and shared
their sufferings. At Jamaica, lie left]
the navy and, marrying Nancy Las-
celles, returned to London. Here he,
began as a surgeon, but was far bet-
ter known as a wit.
A Kindly Character
"He .would rather say a kind thing,
roughly than a harsh thing genially,".
said Professor Wenley. "This preval-
ent lustiness lost nothing from mix-
ture with a certain'peppery impetuous-
ity, the result of keen personal sensi-,
bility, rendered even frailer than usu-
al by a large share .of amour propre,
not to say pride. "Neurotically in-
tense, this disposition magnified every-
thing that touched him, joy no less
than .sorrow. Thus we must not talk
of his brutality or callousness, but
rather of the abuses which so marred
society then, interfering with his ge-
nius, nay, souring -his daily bread," said
Professor Wenley' in' defense of Smoll--
ett's character.
Forceful and Bold.
All through his life we find Smollett
forceful, daring and bold. "He was
like a gladiator wielding a sledge ham-
mer as a favorite weapon," as Profes-
sor Wenley put it.
In his day, Smollett dominated Lon-
don by his fearlessness and even Dr
Johnson bowed before him.
Besides his novels and plays, Smoll-
ett translated both Gil Blas and Don
Quixote into English. He died at
Leghorn, in Sept. 1771.
Delirium Tremens Again'
Dayton, 'Ohio, Aug. 13.-Dayton traf-
fic policemen rubbed their eyes yes-
terday when a minature auto, without
a soul in it, sailed past all semaphores,
It was a driverless car from McCook,

KRAUS ISSUES SUMMER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
Examinations in the literary, eng-
ineering, ph'armacy colleges, and Grad-
uate school will start Wednesday
noon; Aug. 24, and will be continued
through-Friday afternoon, Aug. 26, ac-
cording to a statement issued by Dean
E. H. Kraus, of the Summer session,
yesterday. No deviations from the
schedule' will be permitted.
Classes that recite at 7 o'clock/will
hold their examinations from 10 to 12
o'clock Friday morning, at 8 o'clock
from 8 to 10 o'clock Thursday morn-
ing, at 9 o'clock from 2 to 4 o'clock
Wednesday afternoon, at 10 o'clock
from 4 to 6 o'clock Thursday after-
noon, at 11 o'clock from 8 to 10 o'clock
Friday morning.
Afternoon classes will be examined
at the following hours: At 1 o'clock
from 2 to 4 o'clock Friday afternoon.'
at 2 o'clock from 2 tq 4 o'clock Thurs-
day afternoon, at 3 o'clock from 4 to 6
o'clock Wednesday afternoon, at 4
o'clock from 10 to 12 Thursday.
SUNDAY SRVIES IN
ANN ARBOR CHURCHES
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OPENS
FOR SPECIAL SERMON THIS
MORNING'
The Congregational church will hold
a service this Sunday, at which the
Rev. Ray A. Eusden, of the Plymouth
Congregational church of Lawrence
Kansas, will preach. The church has
closed for the summer, but will be
opened for this occasion.'.
The regular open air service will be
held on the campus at 7:30 o'clock in
the evening. Rev. Charles T. Webb,
of St. Andrew's Episcopal church, will
give the address, speaking on the sub-
ject, "The Mountaineer's Equipment."
George Oscar Bowen will conduct the
group singing.
Rev. Dugald MacFadyen will give
his regular sermon at the morning
service of the First Methodist church
on the subject, "The Supreme Loyal-
ty." The young people's devotional
service is held at 6:30.
The morning service at St. Andrew's
Episcopal church will be conducted as
usual by Rev. Charles T. Webb, who
will preach the sermon on "Human
Nurture."
Dr. Henry P. Klyver, who is preach-
ing at the First Baptist church dur-
ing the absence of Rev. J. M. Wells,
will preach Sunday morning at the
10:30 o'clock service on the topic, "The
Prayer- Chamber." The Bible class
which is held at noon in the Baptist
Guild hall will discuss "The Book of
Phillippians."
UNI TOLIST ROOMS
Canvass of All Available Houses
Starts Monday '

CAME HERE IN 1887 TO OCC
HIS RECENTLY RESIGNED
POSITION
REVISED ACCOUNTING
SCHEME FOR RAILROA
Was at One Time President of
American Economic Asso-
clation
Prof. Henry Carter Adams, fot
and former head of the departme:
political economy at the Universi
Michigan, died at his home
shortly before noon Thursday afte
illness of many months. The pr
sor had been in poor health since
June, at which time he retired as
of the department of. political e
omy, after a service of 34 years.
He was born in Davenport, I
Dec. 31, 1851. He married Miss Be
Wright of Port -Huron, in 1890, a]
survived by her and three sons, H
Carter Adams, Jr.; now with the
cantile marine, New York City,
Theodore W. Adams, member of
Peterson hospital staff here,
Thomas H. Adams, '22, a senior'
dent in the University. Private
eral services will be held at the
dence, 1421 Hill street, at 4 o'c
Saturday afternoon. Interment'
be made at Decora, Iowa.
Came Here When 36
'Professor Adams came to the
versity of Michigan in 1887 at the
of 36. He was then recognized a
authority o'n political economy
became head of the newly establi
economics department here. Unde
leadership it was developed into
largest department of its kind in
country.
For 25 years Professor Adams
statistician for the interstate comn
commission. For six years before
resignation, in 1911, he was in ch,
of the division of statistiev. His
in railway accounting systems
largely responsible for the systen
accounting now in operation on
erican railroads. He worked out
existing accounting system for (
ese railroads while acting as ad'
to the Chinese government. He
operated with Dean Mortimer E. 4
ey, of .the Engineering college,,in
praising the railroad properties
Michigan while acting as chief o:
division of transportation in the
enth United States census from 18
1891.

To list all available rooms so that
the incoming students may be conven-
iently located, is the purpose of ,the
annual room house - canvass of the
Michigan Union to be started Monday.
Aug. 5. The canvassers will -visit
every house within one mile and a
quarter radius of the campus. Such
information as to the kind of room,
its location in the house, light, heat
and price will be requested. It is ex-
pected that one week will be the dura-
tion of the canvass and all houses on
which information has not been secur-
ed may telephone the Union after that
time.
Last year the canvass showed near-
ly 800 rooming houses for men, while
the rooming bureau accommodated
nearly' $,000 with lodgings. The can-
vass this year will be complete, in an1
endeavor to locate the students of the
coming term as satisfactorily as possi-

Served on Journal of Ethries
At one time he' served as assd
editor of the International Jourm
Ethics. He was once president o
American Economics association
a member of the Intelational S
ticians' institute, and the Ame
Statisticians' association. He g,
prominence as an author of iany t
of political economy, railway acc
ing, and taxation.
Previous to doming to the Unive
of Michigan, Professor Adams
studied and lectured widely on E
omic subjects. He received the
gree of Bachelor of Arts at the
versity of Iowa in 1874. Three
later the same university conf
upon him' the Master of Arts de
and the degree of Doctor of Lav
1897. His fellowship at Johns
kins earned his Ph.D. degree the
1878. After that time he spent pe
at Heidelberg, Paris, and Berlin.
four years he was associate prof
of political economy at Cornell.
Built From 40 Students
The department of political eco
here was built from a class c
students in 1887 to 6,000 in 1921, L
his leadership. In accepting his :
nation last June, the Board of Re
said:
"The board accepts the resign
of Professor Adams with regret
wishes to give expression of its a
ciation of his long and successful
ice, which has brought fame t
University as well as to himself
of the great part he played in t1
velopment of this institution. H
long been bne of the leading. me;
of the University faculty, a M,

With the "J-Hop Trial" of Iona
Bogus Dollar versus Samuel 'Oswald
Smith called off while the judge took
the plaintiff to lunch, the stunts of the
Wesleyan guild "flashlight" held at the
First Methodist church last night,
reached.a humorous conclusion.
Kwan Y. Tang, '24E, and Cyrus N.
Tavares, '24, who with their native
Hawaiian music gave a performancel

will
he T

in camp
ersity of

e field and was operated from the rearl

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