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August 11, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ne. But to metit seems that the col-
e studentit s the easiest mark for
ico men that ever lived.
or instance, wh'en college opens,
re will be a man coming back to'
n Arbor who styles himself "Rail-
d Jack" and whose ability totans-
r* questions of any nature entitles
i to an executive position in Thom-
Edison's plant in New Jersey hands
vn but whose actual worth to the
imunity is mighty small. He stands
a box oi any corner, gathers a
wd of students about him, and by
ing advantage of the general spirit
joshing that prevails in this crowd
ects more money per hour than the

.50, Camp C
lankets, Hip
Canteens,T
amp Stoves,
nds, Reg. 'W
s Play. Pup

Ri
dl Wo
, Wh
ts, O
s, etc
pocke

irurrrnunrairrnsrniisrwia
Needs
hairs, Tables, Water and m
Rubber Boot, Ponchos, p
Mess Cans, Knap Sacks, E
etc,
all, Auto-Touro, Child-
and
ilto Tents
MYF Mr
ding Breeches =
men'
ipcord. Corduroy, Serge,
. D. Khaki and Ponge 2
., Ladies Khaki Outing 2
ts at $3.85, others priced 2
Trousers and Hats
ly reduced prices
213 N1 4th Ave,

best plumler in the ctly. He accepts
the jibes of the crowd with a smile
and he can well do it because he
turns the joke on the josher with his
ready wit and fines him a quarter and
then, the josher rather than he josh-
ed himself,comes across and that
much is in Jack's pocket. What does
the crowd get for its money? Ten
cents worth of fresh air, one mill ofj
knowledge that is of no value and
fourteen cents, nine mills, war tax.
Dr. Lovell Again
Then there is Jack's "colleague,"t
the harmless old cobbler, Tom Lovell,
who sells his "literature" for what a
sundae used to cost and the student is
satisfied that he has had his money's
worth of fun out of the old man who
should be pitied rather than made the
brunt of jdkes or the recipient of a
collection of letters that h imagines
are degrees. Not only are the stu-
dents to blame for "egging" Tom on
but the college papers should quit
printing his rot and making news ar-i
ticles of the fact that some society or
other presented him with a "degree"
of P. . Q. or some such bunk.
Last year an old gray. haired man
posing as a phrenologist made the
rounds of the sorority and fraternity
houses, examining heads and predict-
ing futures, the latter of such high
promise that the victim fell for the dol-
lar fee for pleasing his vanity. I saw
one instance where the "professor" sol
pleased a student by telling him that
he would be a great surgeon that he
not only paid for his own reading but
for that of another man in the crowd
The "prdfessor" reaped a harvest ofc
seven dollars in that one house in two
hours, reading the outsides of heads
which would have stood an internalt
reading with much less puffing of theI
vanity of the owners.z
Are They ExpensesIt
Can these expenditures be listed on
the monthly account books (of which
there are undoubtedlynfew) as "amuse-
ment"? Probably so. Then the small-
er items ofs25cents for sundaes should
also be listed in theyame column-
for the "amusement" of an unnatural
appetite and the ruination of a real
appetite whidh puts the owner in the
exact position for criticizing the real
food for which he thinks he pays too
much.
With the installation of new courses
in all the curricula it might be well to
establish' a course of Discretion and
Discrimination, giving a degre of C.S.
(common sense) whereby the students
might, learn the value 0f a dollar and
show by their expendit'ures their ap-
preciation of the denials made by their
parents so that they may be sent to
college. It woul4 lessen the number
of mortgages on farms and the number
of mothers who have to take in wash-
ing and deny themselves of earned
pleasures in their old age, so that their
children can come here to school and
pay the price of a small lof of bread
for a collection of'poorly selected
words written by Tom Lovell, a snappy
answer on the date of Queen Aane's
birth, or a lt of bunk about what great
men and women they will be. Dis-
criminate in the boycotting and the
cost of the natural necessities of life
will not be felt so much. The money
wasted on tomfoolery of this sort in
one year in American colleges would
finish the Union pool and leave some-
thing to show forthe money spent.
Not Defending Prices
This is not a defense of the high
prices in Ann Arbor and the difference
in prices between State and Main
street stores, They are true and must
be fought in another manner than di-
rect antagonism or there might by a

boycott on engaging stdent help and
(Continued on Page Four)
HIGH CLASS FOOD
Served at CHUBB S
j on State St. opposite Lane Hall
iI

....
r-^---------

1 41 J.

In The Line Of Sports

(By Harry B. Grundy)

Calls For. Grid Men
Within the next week preparationsa
for the opening of the 1921 football
season will be well under way. Calls
for candidates have been issued by
most of the Big Ten gridiron mentors,
and soon the football togs will be haul-
ed out of storage preparatory to the
opening of practice Sept. 15. Work is
being rushed at many of the universi-
ties where stadiums are to inaugurate
the opening game of the season.'
Important early games this year will
make it necessary for a number of the
big squads td. get into actual practice
as soons as possible. Of course in
the case of the Western Conference,
teams are prohibited by rule from start-
ing practice as organized squads be-
fore the middle of September. ,How-
ever, these early games will mean that
no time will be lost after actual work
on the gridiron is begun.,
Indiana vs. Harvard
Indiana university, coaiched by Jum-
bo Stiehm, will be the first middle
west team to swing into action in an
intersectional game. On Oct. 8 the
Hoosier squad will meet Harvard at
Cambridge. Indiana will be strong
again this year, and Stiehm may give
the Crimson a surprise. Several years
ago the Hoosiers gave Syracuse, then
champions of the East, a bad beating
in an intersectional game.
Iowa and Notre Dame are scheduled
to clash at Iowa City, Oct. 8. This
will be one of the most important early
clashes and the success of either
team will go a long way toward de-
termining its season's record. Both
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account 'be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources .........$5,000,000.00
707 North University& Ave.
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
FAILINGS'
DINIKNG R0O!S
$7.00 per 'Week-3 Meals,
$6.00 per Week-2 Meals
HOME COOKING
Electric Fans
Cool, Ventilated Rooms
714 M ONR.OE STREET
East of Cutting's Flats

coaches will send well drilled elevens
upon the field.
Notre Dame, not being a member of
the Big Ten, can start practice when-
ever it chooses, and Coach Rockne may
decide to open his drill before Con-
ference squads start. Notre Dame will
be strong again this year, but should
encounter equally, stiff oppostion from]
Howard Jones' boys at Iowa led by
the versatile Aubrey Devine.
Northwestern vs. Chicago
Northwestern and Chicago will open
the Big Ten season on Oct. 1, and will
begin preparations' for the clash im-
mediately after the opening of prac-
tice. As there is great rivalry between
these two schools, the clash is expect-
ed bring out everything the opposing
coaches can give to their men. Both
of these teams have hard battles the
following week-end. The Purple meets
the Gophers at Minneapolis, while the
Staggmen tackle Purdue on Stagg field,
Northwestern in particular will pre-
pare for a hard game with Dr. Wil-
liams' big Gopher team, for the Minne-
sota team is out to regain its lost laur-
els, and will try to avenge the unex-
pected 19 to 0 defeat handed them in
the opener with Northwestern last
year. -Tackling Minnesota at the be-
gining of the season will not give the
Northmen a chance to use their fam-
ous shift which is usually perfected
about the last of October.

Dr. Wilce's champion Buckeye
en will entertain the Gophers at
umbus, Oct. 15, while Illinois wi
change line bucks with Iowa o
Hawkeye field the same date.
Michigan will not open its Co
ence season until Oct. 22, when
State meets the Wolverines onF
field. Previous to this game the
verine machine will be, whipped
shape by three preliminary g
with Case, M. A. C., and Mt. I
Both O. S. U. and Michigan ar
pected to have a number of new
in theid lineups to fill the plac
the stars who have graduated.I
ever, both elevens have a good sto
sophomores to. pick from, and ar
pected to battle desperately.
will strive to keep its record 01
year, while Yost's men will be o
spoil the Buckeye's plans and to
up for last year': defeat.
Chicago Meets Princeton
Oct. 22 will also be the date o
of the big intersectional battles.
that date Chicago tackles Prin
on the latter's field. It will be the
of a two game series, as the con
agreed upon calls for the Tige
journey to the Midway in 1922. Pr:
ton will have a great team this
while Chicago will be stronger
it appeared to most gridiron fans
year. The unfortunate situatio
that neither Chicago nor Indians
resent the Big Ten's best grid t
while they are meeting the crew
the East.

I.

-III[ I

gI111IIlIlIIIIIIt1Uill IIIIIIIIIIII1
LAST TV
_ tHurts
CENTURY COMI
2 Tomorr(
T_ e r
_ L r e
All-star c
A pulsing, vitat drama
heart when awakened
Added- A Vanity
- Nei
itlralllll11 in i tlli ltlr1m i

VO TIMES TONIGHT
acre Trump!
EDY - NEWS - ORCHESI
ofw and Saturday

nd herelyour ideal of a
that every year you'll

4

gf

ast including Gareth Hughes.

Youth"

tics Bank

330 LO. STATE STREET
(Nickels' Arcade)
eserve

4 that shows the change in a woman's
d by the magic of Youth's aspirations
Ccmedy, "Assault and Flatter
ws - Orchestra

J LAUNDRY

k

SERVICF

Cool Drinks-

1

I

result is better work
rade. One day service

So~mmer School
Students
for
Fountain Refreshments
and Fine Candies
visit
The Ietsy Ross Shop
The Fountain Room Veautiful

I,

-Service too

W. B. Gray

v
z.
f
9
'' 709 North University Ave.

I

T9iS
COLUMN
CLOSES
AT I f U

13-15 Nickle 'sAreade

for coming year. Apply at Wolver-
ine Office. 19-3
WANTED-If you have a good second-
hand 16 foot Old Town Canoe you1
would like to sell, phone No. 1 for
date. 19-1
LOST

I

L

i

it .-.jI. '.... 4

. w
"

SHOWS AT

aI

2 3:30 7, 9:00

L A S T T IM E TOD A Y

LAST TIME TODAY

Amethyst ring, Thursday
Finder please call 1070-J.
17

rd.

-A pair of glasses in Farmers
Mechanics Bank, State Street
ch, August 2. Phone 1676 or
19-1
-On Wednesday, a small Water-
fountain pen, without cap.
finder please return to Wolver-
fice. Reward. 17

For Home-Cooked Meals
TRY TUTTLES
On Maynard Street, 1-2 Block South
of Majesic Theatre

LEAH BAIRD
in "'The Volcano",

WL gI'AM R USSELL
in "The Cheater Reformed"

FRIDAY-S'ATURDA'Y

FRIDAY -SATUR DAY

I

CO NWAY TEAR LE
in

CON STANCE TALM AD
in
"Lessons in Love"

'¬ęDuck in'g

The Tiger"

DANCING ARMORY

Tickets At

i

Door,

r Saturday Evening During Summer School

$1

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