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August 06, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-06

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Pr

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IIiIIM .Ii.. r t u.

AT YOUR D(
THREE TIM
A WEEK

11

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 1921

PRICE FIVE

L

Eu

21-1922

BE

2nd Fresh Air
Camp Is Opened
Under the direction of Louis C. Rei-
man, '16, of Ann Arbor, the second
contingent, composed of 66 boys be-
tween the ages of 12 and 14, left yes-
terday for the University's Fresh Air
camp on the shores of Lake Huron.
Four of the number are from Ann Ar-
bor and the rest from Detroit. Abe J.
Cohen, '21L, and Mr. L. M. Walli k,
associate secretary of the Students'
Christian association, accompanied the
party.
The organization of the camp will be
the same as that for the first section.
,which was completed July 22, with the
exception of a few changes in the staff.
of counsellors.
Although the campaign which was
held last week was a success, it will
be necessary to raise $200 more in or-
der to continue the camp for the third
section, through the end of the sum-
mer.

'BOYCOTT SODA OEALERS' 15 STUDENT
STAND VOICED INWLVE INEBLLOT

Children Appear
In Demonstration

i

Replies Suggest Campaign on
of Books and Omher
Necessities

Prices

the American Legion, wrote as fol
lows: "Sodas and sundaes are not
necessities, and I have not had one for
months. I expect to continue the
same policy until prices ire more
nearly fair than they are now."

,ANS

j S U E H H G A N E S L VBEX C E E D S R IG H I

PROSECUTOR GOING AFTER
DETROIT FIZZ PROFITEERS
Detroit, Aug. 6. - Assistant Prose-
cutor Edwin S. Bartlett has been de-
tailed by Prosecuting Attorney Paul
NW. Voorheis to conduct the investiga-
tion of soda and candy prices here,
which will be undertaken immediate-
ly after the present probe of fruit
rates is completed.
8
One hundred per cent in favor of a"
reduction in local soda price's is the
.standing of the campus, if the attitude
taken by those who filled out and re-
turned the soda price ballots recently'
printed in The Wolverine may be
taken as any criterion. In no case
was any vote registered in favor of a
continuation of present rates charged,
by campus dealers in(sodas, sundaes,
and soft drinks.
Various expressions of opinion.
were also included with the ballots,c

according
ig editor
ie will be
ring the
the same
s adopted
siderably
om 56 to
pictorial
aphasized
ry month
spread of
is and of,

FRIDAY IS STILL
IN WASHINGTON

Many repties seemed strongly to
favor a general reduction in rates on
all commodities. One senior, after,
marking his ballot, added below:
( "Why not make the necessities and
luxuries both the same price as they
are on Main street?" Another asked,
"Why stop with sodas? Every re-
tailer in Ann Arbor is higher on most
things handled than those of Detroit
and Jackson."
Favor Further Campaign
Many seemed to favor an investiga-
tion of board rates. Said one; "Why
confine this to sodas a in sundaes?
Board is just as unreasonable and
much more necessary," while another
suggested briefly: "Not only sodas
and sundaes but all edibles."
Other Opinions.
Others, however, limited themselves
to urgent requests for the reduction
of confections. One suggested' quite
pointedly: "For two cents worth of
fresh peach and five to six cents
worth of ice cream, one State street
confectioner has the audacity to
charge 25 cents." Another, a junior,
brought up the boycott idea again.- He
said: "High ┬░prices on State street
cannot survive a concerted boycott.
This, however, would only be effective
when all of the students co-operate."

(BY E. .M.)
Undoubtedly the youngest perform-
ers ever appearing before an Ann Ar-
bor audience were assembled at 7:30
o'clock Friday night in - Pattengill
auditorium to give a public demon-
stration of the progress of the new
method of piano instruction introduc-
ed this summer by the School of
Music. Miss Hazel Gertrude Kins-
cella, who has organized the *ok
here, directed the recital,' which was
conducted as an open lesson.
Nearly, 40 public school children,
who had never had music lessons of
any kind, some of whom do not even
have pianos in their homes, were seat-
ed at little tables, on which were
stretched cardboard keyboards paint-
ed with four octaves. These children
know perfectly the first fundamentals
of music, the rythm, clefs, and note
values, and are able to play intelli-
gently on their keyboards the scales
of C,'G, and D, as well as simple exer-
cises.

COATES, '22E, ALLEGES HIS STJ
AGE PRIVILEGES WERE
REMOVED
USES BOAT HIMSELF;
FRIEND RETURNS]I
Objection Said to he Made to Me
Lending of Privately Owned
Canoes
That the pianagement of Saunde
Canoe livery has been taking a di
inct advantage of its monopoly
canoe storage, and has occasiona
exceeded its rights by refusing to a
low students owning canoes stored
the boat house to loan them out
their friends, is ,the charge made r
cently by certain patrons of Saun

E,

Will

Not Meet with State Officials
Today to Receive M. A. C.
Appolutmeni;

f Ja
'ho
for
be

OFFER HELD OPEN BY BOARD
ide FOR MEETING COMING WEEK
ni forth-
nies will-
short Prof. David Friday, of the econom-
articles ics department, who was expected to
ear and meet with the state agricultural board
;oing to 1in Lansing today and receive his nom-'
coming ination for the presidency of the
of last Michigan Agricultural college, is still .
will be in Washington and will not return
mes C. until tomorrow, according to informa-
is busy tion that was received at his home in
the de' Ann Arbor last night. As a conse-
quence, the meeting of. the board has
a foot- been postponed until next week, when
will be ,Professor Friday will decide upon the
feature, time for his trip to Lansing.
The offer. of the position is still
1 write held open by the state board, accord-
traininging to dispatches receive% from Lan-
e ear sing. As announced earlier in the
ne goes week, Professor Friday is engaged up-,
, ithe on work for the government in prep-
11 Time aration for some new legislation on
is storythe federal reserve banks, but has
by-gone expressed his willingness to consider
oing, the offer 'after the first of next year.
sage He"has decided to request the Board
ader of of Regents for a year's leave of ab-
a mes- sence, in order to complete . some
)utlined writing that he has started and to
s in a finish, his consultation work with the
Irawing government.

the general suggestions being not
only in favor of the inauguration of a
boycott with relation to all local con-
fectioneries, but also a general reduc-
tion in the prices of all commodities,
especially those which are essential
to living.
Faculty Man Boycotts
One member of the faculty, who is-
also An ex-service man and belongs to

ie

IMMEL EADS "NATHAN
KALE".P LAY BY1 FITC
PORTRAYAL OF CHIEF CHARACT-
ER PLEASES LAST NIGHT'S
AUDIENCE
Four acts from the play "Nathan
Hale," by Fitch, were read by Prof.
Ray K. Immel, of the department of
oratory, last evening in Sarah ,Caswell
Angell hall. Professor Immel did fullI
justice to the difficult characteriza-
tions involved, a fact not unnoticed by
the audience.
The action of the play takes place
from April 1775, until September, 1776,
and deals with the efforts of Nathan
Hale, a Connecticut school teacher, to
secure certain plans from the British
army relative to a projected military
manoeuvre against the American army
under General Washington. Hale saw
service as a captain in the American
army while stationed in New England,
and volunteered to perform this haz-
ardous task at the urgent request of
the American commander-in-chief.
He secured the information, only to
be detected by a British officer as a
spy. By means of a ruse, Hale gave
(Continued on Page Four)
ATTACKS" MOVIE PRICES,
GENERAL REDUCTION IN PRICES
NOT FOLLOWED BY LOCAL MAN-
AGERS

-- - I

Bishop Points Out That Famous Euro-
pean Buildings Were Mere
Makeshifts
I -
VENTILATION AND LIGH'ING
RECEIVING MORE ATTENTION

FUNOAY SEVCS I
Dr. J. T. Sunderland, of New York
ity, will preach Sunday morning at
be Unitarian church, at the last sere-
ce before the church closes for the
emainder of the summer. 'Dr. Sun-
erland was for 20 years minster of

COMPLETE. PLANS FOR
VET CAMP IN -ILLINOIS
GUN AND BLADE MEETING SETS
DATE OF TRIP TO SHERIDAN
AT AUGUST 27
Final plans for the proposed trip
to be made by more than 50 federal
board students of the University to
the veterans' vacation camp at Fort
Sheridan were completed at the meet-
ing of the Gun and Blade club held
Thursday night at the Union. The
date of leaving was finally set for aSt-
urday, Aug. 27, and a special car will
be provided, which will start at' 9
o'clock in the morning.
Arrange Athletic Program
Much attention is being given to
plans for the amusements at the
camp. There will be various sports,
including baseball, track, tennis, and
golf. W. C. Parmeter, '24M, and C. A.
Miller, '24E, were chosen athletic di-
rectors, at the meeting last night, to
,have charge of the athletic program.
Since there will be representatives
from several universities, including
Chicago, Wisconsin, Ohio, and M. A.
C., there are to be intercollegiate con-
tests in all the sports, the schedules
of which are now being arranged. ,
Other Amusements
In addition to the athletic program,
there will be other forms of .amuse-
ment, for it is not planned to make,
the outing military in any respect.
Theatrical companies from Chicago
are planning to show at the camp, and
there will be many other attractions.
All members planning to make the
trip should communicate with F. L.,
Donalson, '23, acting president of the
Gun and Blade club.
DEADLOCK REACHED
BY ALLY EXPERTS
A hopeless deadlock was the result
attained by allied experts last night in
their conference at Paris oI the Si-
lesian question, according to dis-
patches from that city. .The irrecon-
cilability of the British and French,
views on the delimitation of the prov-
ince has resulted in complete dis-'
agreement and no working report can
be prepared in time for the Supreme,
council's meeting Monday.
The French had earlier' expressed
their unwillingness to accept the
British and Italian demand that a

"We of America , have made few,
contributions to the fine arts of the
world, but when it comes to the
field of architecture we have done a
great deal," said Mr. W. W. Bishop,
University librarian, in a lecture- on
"Large Library Buildings: an Amer-
ican Contribution to Architecture", at
5 o'clock yesterday afternoon in Nat-,
ural Science auditorium.
Mr. Bishop pointed out that the fam-
ous libraries of Europe were make-
shifts. Buildings that were intended
for palaces or museums have been'
transfbrmed into public libraries,bthe
result being that they aire beautiful
spectacles, without any of the neces-
sary conveniences of a library. "The
Gothic structure is very beautiful,"
said Mr. Bishop, "but never should be
used in building a library."
Some of the great libraries of the
world, that house famous literary col-
lections, are very inaccessible, it often
being necessary to walk a quarter of
a mile for a single volume. The
lighting is poor and there was.never a -
thought given to ventilation of the
right kind.-
"The work of building libraries in
the United States began about 40
years ago, and in that short space of
time we have made wonderful prog-
ress," said ,the librarian. "There was
a tendency among the first builders
of libraries to copy after the old Eu-
ropean structures, but our increasing
colle tions demand a change," he
continued. He then went on to ,ex-
plain the, development of the build-
ings in this country. "We are paying
more and more attention to lighting,
ventilation, facility in getting books,
and their protection," explained Mr.
Bishop. "There are many great col-
lections that are practically unpro-
tected in some of the great libraries."
In mentioning some of' the best
buildings of this country, Mr. Bishop
pointed to the national library at
Washington as the greatest. This
beautiful structure is one of the sim-
plest in the world. The plans were
completed by an army officer and,
true to the army style, efficiency is
stamped throughout. This great
building can house over 1,600,000
books, and any one can be reached in
a few minutes.
are realizing the need of the library
pointed out as perhaps the second best
in the country. "All our large cities
are realizing the ned of the library
more than ever and are constructing
beautiful buildings that are planned
so that their collections can be en-
larged.
"We cannot. compare the university
library with the city library," said
Mr. Bishop. "Their make up and use
are entirely different, but the univer-
sity library has been developed along
the same lines that the nublic library

ers'.
One stdent in particular, Arther E
Coates, '22E, substitute catcher on las
year's Varsity baseball nine, follov
ing a recent argument with the mai
agement in regard to letting out
canoe owned by Coates himself 1
friends, is said recently to have ha
his storage rights withdrawn.
Takes Out Party of Four
The trouble is reported to ha)
started when, on Ffiday, July 2
Coates, with Nelson Boonstra, '22]
and two others, went out in Coate
canoe, which has been stored at ti
boat house all this year. After bein
out for only a short time, Coates an
one of the other members of the part
left the canoe in charge of Boonstra
who later returned it to the bo
house.
In speaking of the affair, Coate
said recently: "When Boonstra r
turned, to the boat house, one of t
men in charge 'bawled him out,' an
wouldn't let him 'sign in.' I don
like to have my friends called dow
for using my canoe when I am pei
fectly willing that they should do so,
he went on, "so I wrote Saunders' an
told them what I thought .of such a
tions.
Calls it an Intrusion
'"I also told them that I had neve
received a cent for the use of my ca
oe by others, and that, inasmucA as I
was my own personal property, I fe]
I really had a perfect right to le
anybody use it I wanted to, and that
contract, such as Mr. Saunders make
every patron canoe-owner sign, was i
my opinion unfair. I also enclosed
check with my letter, to pay fo m
rental for next year," he added.
Apparently Coates' communicatio
was not relished by the manageme
for, according to him; the check wa
returned on Aug. 4, with a letter sta
ing that his canoe. storage had bee:
cancelled and asking that his can
be removed at once. The letter rea
as, follows:
"Mr. Coates: - We are returnin
your check of Aug. 1. Your canoe stoi
age Is cancelled, so please come dow
and remove your canoe.
"SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVER1.
"Per G. H. S.
"Did the man who called your frien
down for returning your canoe kno'
that you had'gone out with him in th
first place?" Coates was asked.
Says Had Signed Out
"He knew that I had signed out m
self, I am sure," was his reply. '"Pei
sonally, I don't relish being told wh,
I shall do with my own personal pr
perty," he added, "and.I' can hard]
understand how anyne has a re
right to dictate what persons shall d
with canoes of their own, which ait
only in his'Bcare for purposes of sto
age."
Yesterday is Sore4
American League
New York 7, Detroit 3.
Washington 4, Cleveland 1.
Boston 10, Chicago 1.
Philadelphia 4, St. Louis 2.,

the church here, and
time in Anp Arbor this
home of his daughter.
old friends in thiis city

is spending a
summer at the
He has many
who knew him

his long years of service he
regular campus open air ser
ll be held as usual at 7:
in the evening in front of t
r. Rev. I. W. Kelsey, one
te secretaries of the Y. M.
1 speak on "World Objective
memoration of Interdepen
ay, August 4,.1914", is the su
which Rev. Dugald MacFa
London, England,, will spe
First Methodist church at t
g service. At 6:30 o'clock
ening there will be a you
s devotional meeting in t
of the church led by Mr. Jo
The subject will be "TI
Student's Faith".
lie Presbyterian church R
Brown, of Bad Axe, willd
i.e sermon at the 10:30 o'clo
The Bible class will be he
0 o'clock, and at 6:30 o'clo

re.
rv- Editor, The Wolverine:
:30 ' While we. are handing bouquets re-
he garding high prices why don't we,
of mention our palaces of the screen
C. drama? Did you ever stop to think
s". what we pay to see these first-run
ad- pictures, only from one to.six months
ib- old? Well, think of it now.
ad- In Detroit we may visit the Madi-
ak son or the Adams theaters, for in-
he stance, and for 35 cents we may see
in the latest in pictures projected with-
ng out a flicker and accompanied by a
he delightful, symphony orchestra -
hn whose overture is changed weekly.
he The theater is cool and comfortable
Jam in Lobby
ev. In Ann Arbor, however, when we
de- step out to see a movie, we amble
ck up to the theater, any one of them, we
eld jam into the lobby-there is nothing
ck else to do if you want a ticket-and'
et. eventually we persuade the lady to,
ion let us give her our 35 cents.
pal It is exceedingly hot. It will

nnd of the

ty of U

Silesia

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