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August 02, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

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Itruerruw

AT YOUR
THREE

A WE

F

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 2, 1921

9

'RICE:

PRICE:

RECONSIDERS ;
[ILIPPINE POS11

450 ADVISERS TO
ASSSTfREHE

Expected to Be Named by Harding as
Head Within Few Weeks
Washington, Aug. 2. - Gen. Leon-
ard Wood for governor general of the
Philippines is the nomination which
j President Harding is expected to send
to the senate'for confirmation, possi-
bly within the next few weeks.
General Wood, who is still in the
islands on a special tour of investiga-
tion for the President, is understood
to have changed his attitude toward
the office since his visit. t
The Philippine\ post is the juiciest
of the plums remaining on the pat-
ronage tree. It pa,, s $18,000 a year,
with an additional $15,000 : for ex-
penses.1

Upperclassmen Will Help Newcomers
in Understanding 1ichigan .
Spirit
COMMITTEE STILL NEEDS
MORE MEN TO VOLUNTEER
With the idea of a greater Michigan
in mind, the Union Student Advisory
committee has been formed with 450
representative upperclassmen who
will be placed in charge of the fresh-'
man class. It will be their duty to
'advise the first year men in the mat-
ter of studies, and to inculcate into
them the spirit of Michigan.

PLAN EXCURSION
TO PUT-IN-BAY
Students Will Have Points of Interest
About Island Explained
Leaving early Saturday morning unA
der the direction of Prof. I. D. Scott,
of the geology department, an excur-
sion party will imake the trip by boat
from Detroit to Put-in-Bay, returning
to Ann Arbor that evening. While at
the island, the members of the +party
will be conducted on an exploration
trip through the various caves there
and will have the geological signific-
ance of the formations explained to
there.
The island is interesting from an
liistorical as well as geological point
of view, inasmuch as it was here that
Admiral Perry came after his victory
on Lake Erie. This event is commem-
orated by the recent erection of al
monument, from the top of which may,
be had the most excellentrviews. t
Students, and their friends, who
would like to make the trip are ask-
ed'to communicate as soon as possible1
with either Professor ..Scott of Prof.E
. C. McMurry, room G-217 or G-440,
Natural 'Science building.
The fare will be $2.46 for each per-1

S'TUDENTS AND FACULTY MEMBER
ADVOCATE STRICT SODA BOYCOO
UNION AND FISHER'S MAKEI

TAPROOM BAR COMES DOWN IN
PRICE ON THREE
DISHES

DRUGGIST
SODAS

REDUCES
TO OLD RATE

GENERAL OPINION FAVOR
TION IN BUYING OF
,FECTIONS
SAY ONLY DEFINIT
ACTION EFFE
Scheme Would Place Burde
sponsibility on Stud'
Patrons
That the establishment of

Still Hold to Higher :Charges on
Most Fountain
Articles'
In accordance with the demand for'

- Although the final report of the
Wood investigation has not yet been
made, it is understood in unofficial
advices from Manila, that it will be
adverse to the early granting of Phil-
*ippine independence.
Wood's previous service in the
Philippines, his experience as military
governor of Cuba and later as govern-
or of Moro province, Philippines, are
considered to fit him above alt others
for the post.
Wood may not even return to the
United States to present his report,
but may accept appo'intment as gov-
ernor general and remain in the is-
lands, assuming his .duties immedi-

lower rates on sodas, sundaes and soft [boycott on confectioners

D RELATIONS
DE BYLEADERS

Each adviser will be given the
names of four freshmen and will be
gxpected to have these men call on
him at reasonable intervals, in order
that he may be able( to watch the
progress they have made,, and toi ad-
vise them if need be. He is to in-
struct the freshmen in'the tradjtions
and ideals of the University, and to
answer their inevitable questions con-
cerning the ways of the place.
Work of Each Slight
The work of the adviser is compar-
atively slight, according to the com-
mittee. It will talie up pfactically
none of his time, and yet it will be
one of the most important and funda-
mental tasks on the campus. It will
be the real duty of the adviser to see
that his freshmen gain the idea that
they have a real friend on the campus,
one- who has their interests at heart.
It is for him, moreover, to see that
his freshmen are made to understand
that they are wanted at Michigan,
sand, most important of all, that his
men get a square deal in every way.,
The committeemen are working on.
the assumption that if a, man is given
a square deal he cann6t help becom-
ing a real. believer in the absolute,
worthwhile quality of Michigan. Real-
izing that he has a friend, the first
year student will feel it incumbent
upon him to work for a greater Mich-
gan, and that he has a free chance to
become the best kind of Michigan
man.

drinks, several reductions in rate have
been made recently, both by the tap-
room bar in the Michigan Union and
by Fisher's pharmacy, at 227 E. Lib-

!
'

-

son.

SMALLER CITY I S
MAN'S REARDE

'2
c
p
d
e
0
2
c
h
bra
Tj
s
L'
ix
a.;

erty street.
Fisher's have come down to 11
cents on all sodas. Sundaes are still
17 cents, extra-heavy syrup sundaes
22 cents, and plain ice cream 11
cents. Seven cents, however, is the
price now charged there sfor "cokes".
Thy. Union taproom has made a. re-
duction of 5 cents each on frappes,
egg frappes, and sundaes, the prices
of these three dishes being now 15,
20, and 15 cents, respectively. Sodas,
containing Boston ice cream, still sell
for 15 cents, and "cokes" for 5, the
Uegular price always charged at the
Union.
The Sugden Drug company, at 302
South State street, is the other dealer
Who has come down to the price of
11 cents for sodas, while the Busy
Bee has announced its intention of
naking a general cut in prices as soon
is the fall goods come in.

English System Combines
With Industrial Wel.
fare

I are thought to be too high is
method whereby the rates
brought down to a Aevel satisf

Beauty

e Asserts People Are Lacking
Knowledge of International
Issues

SAYS WE SHOULD REALIZE
VALUE OF COUNTRY LIFE

in

NG ADDRESS
LTTE OF POLITICS

Viscount James Bryce, in the open-
ing address of the Institute of Poli-
tics, now meeting at Williams college,
at Williamstown, Mass., Saturday night
took up the development of interna-
tional relations as begun in the days
of ancient peoples and as continued
to the present day, when "they have
been shattered by a desolating war
and not resettled by any real peace."
"Broadly speaking," he said, "in-
ternational relations are what the
leaders of peoples make them, be-
cause under every political institution
that has ever been devised the many
are led by the few."
Two National Relations
Viscount Bryce went on to explain
that there' are two relations in which
nations stand to one another-that of
war, and' that of peace, and that our
present aim should be to understand
what may have , been the causes of
war and what may be the sources of
peace. Two fundamental propositions
must be remembered in the course ;,
an inquiry, into the relations of na-
tions. One is the' dependence of a
nation on other communities, and
subject to no control save that of
public opinion, and the other is that
the prdpect of improving the rela-
tions of states, and peoples to one an-
other depends on the possibility of im-
proving human nature itself.
He gave it as his opinion that a
sound and wide view of. national in-
terests, teaching the peoples that they
would gain more by the co-operation
of communities than by their conflict,
may do much to better those rela-
tions, but in the last resort theques-_
tio is one of moral progress of the
individual men who compose the com-

Volunteers Asked
Many men have signified their will-
ingness to co-operate in this matter
of advising freshmen, but a few more
men are still needed. Those interest-
ed in this work are requested to fill
out the blank to be found elewhere n
this issue and send it at once to the
Michigan Union.
3 ARTISTS APPEAR AT
WEDONESDAYS CONCERT
DIETERLE, WHITMIRE, AND MRS,
RHEAD WILL OFFER VARIED
PROGRAM,.
Announcement of 'the next program
of the series of faculty concerts be-
ing given during the Summer session
has been made, the entertainment be-
ing scheduled to be held at 8 o'clock
,tomorrow evening, in Hill auditorium.
No admission fee will be charged.
The program as given out is as fol-
lows:
Recitative, "0 Sante Medalia" and
Aria: "Dio possente" from.
Faust ..................Gounod
Robert Richard Dieterle
Etude. Op. 10, No. 3; Etude Op.
25, No. 6; Ballade Op. 47....Chopin
Mrs. George B. Rhead
Vergin tutto amor (1684-1755.Durante
Adieu, chere Louise (1769)..Monsigny
Lakme, ton doux regard.......Delibes
Sotto il ciel..............Sibella
Mr. Dieterle
Canto amoroso ... Sammartini-Elman
Schon Rosmarin..........Kreisler
Serenade Espagnole.........
. Chaminade-Kreisler
Gavotte..........Gossec-Burmester
Alla Zingarsca.......Tschetschulin
Anthony J. Whitmire
Trade Winds ................Keel
Treat Me Nice ..... . ..Carpenter
Canzonetta ........... ....Boyd
Sylvia .....................Cox
Mr. Dieterle
Accompanists -Frank L..Thomas and
Earl V. Moore.
Secand Lnw Sesusn Onens

A
t
{
i
r,
1
E

"The Garden City movement belongs
to a distinctly modern civilization,",
declared the Rev. Dugald MacFadyen,
of London, England, in a lecture on
"The Garden City Plan in England"
at the Natural Science auditorium last
evening. "It is an attempt to create
a town of the proper size, and with
the proper spirit so that it will make'
man's life better and more ,worth
while," he added.
"Good government," 'the lecturer
.continued, "can be administered ,only
when the size of the ci-ty is limited.
Cities like London and New York do
not command the same degree of civic,
pride that a smaller one does."
20,000 Proper Size
Dr. MacFadyen answered the ques-
tion as to what is the proper size of
a town in the words of Plato, who said
"the town of best dimensions should
have 5,040 houses." With four living
in each house, this would give a popu-
lation of about 20,000 or approximately
the size of Ann Arbor.
'The biggest problem before these
town reformers, Dr MacFadyen point-
ed out, is the question,of how to make

Gun and Wiade
Plans, Summer
Camp .Program
More than 60 federal board students
in the University are expected to at-
tend the Veterans' Vacation camp to
be' held at Fort Sheridan, Ill., shortly
after Summer school, the exact date of
which will be decided upon at -a meet-
ing of the Gun and Blade club~ to be
held at 7:30 o'clock Thursday evening
in room 318 of the Union.
The students plan to travel by spec-
ial car from Ann Arbor and will stay
at the camp about two weeks., It is
planned not to make the outing milit-
ary in any respect, but- to conduct
merely a vacation camp where the vet-
erans may enjoy almost every amuse-
ment, including golf, tennis, swim-
ming, dancing, and baseball.
Federal board students who plan to
attend are asked to be on hand for
the meeting Thursday.
MANAGER OF MAJ ACCEPTS'
NEW POSITION IN JACKSON
Gerald 0. Hoag, for two years
manager of the Majestic theater here,
has accepted the position of manager
bf the Orpheum theater, at Jackson,
and has left to assume his new du-
ties. ,
Although Hoag's successor has not
yet been named, J. S. Helsdon, mana-
ger of the Arcade, will be in charge
of the Majestic until the opening of
the Arcade theater in the fall.

the patrons, w~as the opinion gi
by a number of students and me
of the faculty who were inter
yesterday.
The statements made ar'e as fo
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of ti
leges of Enginering and Archit
"The way to reduce prices is t
buying everything which is not
sential. People stopped buildir
building prices immediately stat
come down."
Floyd A. Sergeant, '22,
mander, of the University post
American Legion: "I think
the way to bring prices down
everyone to begin going to the le
pensive confectionery shops.
over, if the rates charged by th
ions dealers were to be publishe
by side, we might be the better ei
to judge who was overcharging 1
could act accordingly."
Speaks in Parables
Renaud Sherwood, '22: "I wa
jitney bus the other day In Detrc
and a man was just getting ou
handed the jitney man five cen
was promptly told that the far
20 cents after 11 o'clock. The
said, "You've got me wrong if
think you can get 20 cents out c
I speak in parables."
Lloyd E. Thatcher, of the zoolo
partment: "There is absolute
one way to bring down the pric
that is through a definite, con
boycott. Only you have to do i
enough so that the merchayts"]
will be eaten up."
- ierbert Dunham, '21E: . "Of e
the only way to reduce prices
boycott the merchants. We can
down soda rates in a week if w
leave the confectioners' pr
alone."
Clarence Lucas, '23E: "State
prices can only be reduced whe
students reduce them., A boyc
the only method. We must pati
the merchants who have granted
duction'in confection prices."
George M. Vail, '21: "There is
one way to bring down anyl
and that is not to trade with the
.chants who demand them."
Take Advantage
Fred J. Renshaw, '22E:'"The
street merchants know that stt
will buy articles and they take a
tage of their proximity to the ca
thinking that students will buy t
nearest place. Until we show
otherwise State street prices wi
main high."
K. Van Svere, Grad.: "I say 3
to buy. Then prices willhave to
down."
E. L. Thurer, '24: - "I believ
boycotting is the only thing tha
bring the prices down. I thin
slould buy where things are che
or buy something else beside
and sundaes until the rates a
creased."
ENGINEERS CLOSE
OPENING SECT]
Topinbee, Aug., 2. - Closing
roll call, the first section of engi
at Camp Davis came to an end
o'clock Friday afternoon. The fin
'aminations were ,held from We
day to Friday morning, the rem
time being spent. in turning in
equipment.

a small village and country life so
interesting that people will want to
stay in the colintry. This problem is
also hitting America with tremendous
force since the war. Movies are a
great factor in making rurallife inter-
esting, and no' longer can poor movies
be tolerated. Libraries and lectures
according to him, are well enough in
their way, but as a real force they are.
rather worthless.
He went on to say that there are
four fundamentals that must be ob-
served in the building of any garden
city, and that these four are all car-
(Continued on Page Four)

"SERVANT IN THE HOUSE," VEHICLE
CHOSEN BY PLAY PRODUCTION CLASS

ders Change Trend -
ce briefly sketched the ca-
apoleon Bonaparte, Bis-
our, Kossuth and Mazzini,
hat if it had not been for
leaders there would have
ferenlt Europe today. 'The
said, have little knowledge
iitiative in all political ac-
specially is.-this so in for-
ons. They are whet their

"The Servant in the House," a moral
play 'by Charles Rann Kennedy, will
be produced at Sarah Caswell Angell
hall, on Thursday and Friday eve-
nings, Aug. 18 and 19, in connection
with the work of the class in play
production, and under tlhe personal
supervision of Prof. R. D. T. Hollister,
of the department, of public speaking.
The cast is made up of experienced
local talent, many of the actors' hav-
ing appeared recently on the local
stage.
An exceptionally capable cast is
said to have been secured by Profes-
sor Hollister. George Wilner, of the
department of public speaking, whose
work in the character of Robert, the

1916, will again essay that role. Thel
part of Martha will be played by Miss
Marion P. Stowe of the department
of public speaking of Iowa State col-
lege.
C. D. Swift, who appeared here in
1917 in the "Merry Wives of Windsor,"
is cast as the Vicar. E. R. Baxter who
played here in "Pillers of Society,"
will take the part of the Bishop of
Lancashire, and Miss Lotta Martin,
teacher of public speaking in Detroit,
has been assigned the part of Mary,
while Harold B. Lipsitz, who played in
Professor Hollister's recent produc-
tion of "The Great Galeoto," will fill
the roll of Manson.
The proceeds of the production will

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