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June 19, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-a

! IN Z'

concerts are given free to the general !
student public as weliras to the com-J
munity and form an important part of
the School of Music's comprehensive
scheme for the general development of
music in Ann Arbor and its environs.-
SCOPE OF I. 0. T. C. WORK
TO BE BROADENED IN FALL

ROBUINS UIE STALK
.OIN PLYMOUTH PEGRIMS

," 1

any way in-
most cordial-
ring a friend
[ SEEKEL,'
President.

.1 A j~ Ld

One)
short years,
ears of ef-
similar or-
t at all, of
of renown

(Continued from Page One)
only student officers are eligible, is as-
cured.
Arrangements have been made for
the election of sponsors for each unit
from among the University women.
These sponsors will be the official'rep-
resentatives of the various sub-organ-
izations and will be present on cere-
monial occasions and will also be the
official hostesses at social functions.
The chaperones will be selected from
among the wives of the Military de-
partment officers or of other members
of the faculty.
" The principal social event of the'
year will be the annual military ball
which will be-given in the early spring
under the auspices of the R. 0. T. C.
club, of which Robert L. Neal, '22E, is
president for the coming year.
CRAIG DECIDES TO LEAVES
BRITISH IRISH CONFERENCE=
(Continued from.Page One)
form of an interview, has put a damp-
er on the hopeful spirit.
"Nothing is allowed to leak as to
what takes place behind the closed
doors of the cabinet room, and the
secrecy even extends to a tacit agree-
ment to put no questions on th'e sub-
ject in parliament. The negotiations,
in fact, have all the character of dip-
lomatic exchanges between two for-
eign diplomats."

DESCRIBES LIFE OF AMERICAN
COLONISTS FROM NEW
ANGLE
Rev. Sidney S. Robbiis, pastor of
the Unitarian church here, and for-
merly head of the Plymouth Unitarian
church, in Plymouth, Mass., gave an
illustrated lecture on the subject of
"Plymouth and the .Pilgrims" last
night in the auditorium of the Natural
Science building.
Being a student of the, history of
early American exploration and settle-

ment, Dr. Robbins was able to
many new and not-often-heard
ies of the Pilgrim fathers, andI
hardships in finally establishing1
colony at Plmouth.
In the course of his lecture
Robbins gave a few words of

give
stor-
their
their

Dr.
ex-

sires to eat for charitable reasons one
goes to a church social.
Awful Management.
The prices which the Ann Arbor
restaurants charge are far too high,
and consequently the prices which the!
tap room charges are far too high.
The fault of the first does not excuse
the fault of the second, especially in
view of the fact that the Union is not
a money making institution. The
more one considers it the more prone
one is to think that the managementj
must be truly awful.
As for the quality of the food. Some
of it is really first rate, and some of
it is really terrible, enough to turn the
stomach of any civilized man. The
person who aet'ially likes everything
served in the tap room must be a
hill-billy.
Need Bromide, Hooch, Dynamite
This whole matter is rather disgust-
ing. The only .way to get anything
done in Ann Arbor is to go at it with
a ton of dynamite. And when one,
taking a bromide for the nerves and
a shot of hooch to keep up cour-
age, attempts this, one is promptly
squelched with college yells, and
drowned out by the singing of "The
Yellav and Blue", the trick of the
politician, ward-heeler, and hamfat.
The Wolverine, like the Daily, in-
evitably sides with institutions at-
tacked. Name a time when it hasn't.
It must be in the wrong once in
awhile. But no, it is not; it is always
constructive"! "FALSTAFF".

Enlarged
complimentary
ch during, the
s attracted so
be conducted
lines as in the
ld in Hill au-
ioons at inter-
weeks of the
rograms, while
by members of
aculty, will be#
with large var-
engagement of
artists. These

planation in regard to what is at
present being done at Plymouth in
celebrating the tercentenary anniver-
sary of the landing of the Pilgrims..
The remainder of the talk was ac-
companied by slides, showing many
places of interest and vitally connect-
ed with the life of these early Amer-
ican colonists. Many illustrations of
supposed phases of the life of the
Pilgrims, together with restorations
of Plymouth as it is thought to have
been originally, were also among the
slides shown as well. as extracts from
the Mayflower compact, Governor
Bradford's history of the colony, and
other historic documents. In addition,
the speaker exhibited a number of
photographs of Plymouth as it is to-
day, with pictures included of the
rock on which the Pilgrims are ┬žup-
posed to have landed, and of many
relics remaining to show the character
of their life in the New World.
A part of Dr. Robbins' talk was de-
voted to the listing of a number of
books which contain -information re-
garding the history of the Plymouth
colony.
At the close of the address the
Rev. Dugald MacFayden, who was
seated in the front rw, arose and
added a few remarks to those of tht
lecturer, explaining that there is much
circumstantial evidence, not generally
known, to prove that the skeleton of
the historic Mayflower is at the pres-
ent time being used as the roof of an

COMPLETEDBY 51 C. A.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOR NEX'T
YEAR ANNOUNCED YESTER-
DAY BY ASSOCIATION
A religious census of the Summerl
session has just been completed by
the University Students' Christian as-
sociation. Of the total registration of
2.646, 533 men and 73 women stated
"no preference," the remainder being
apportioned as follows: Methodist,'
318 men and 102 women rmembers,.
with a preference of 73 men and 20
women; Presbyterian, 205 men and 9,2
women, with a preference of 36 men
and 25 women.
Congregationalists Third
The total of Congregational students
was 126 men and 62 women, with a
preference of 56 men and 23 women;
Episcopal, 151 men and 55 women,
with a preference of 14 men and 8
women; Roman Catholic, 129 men and
46 women, with a preference of 5
men; Baptist, 75 men and 38 women.
with a preference of 19 men and 2
women; Lutheran, 69 men and 21
women, with a preference of 3 men;
Jewish, 33 men and 3 women, with a.'
preference of 13 men and 6 wonen;
.Christian, 34 men and 11 women, with
a preference of 2 men;' Christian Sci-
ence, 5 men and 8 women, with a pre-
ference of 15 men and 12 women.
Snadler Totals
The Reform church had 30 men and
4 women, with a preference expressed
by 1 man; Unitarian, 10 men and 61
women, with a preference of 17 men
and 2 women; United Brethren, 5 men
and 1 women, with a preference of 3
men; Evangelical, 6 men and 1 wo-
man, with a preference of 1 man;
Free Methodist, 3 men and 2 women;
Evangelical association, 3 men and 2
women; Friends, 3 men and 1 woman;
A. M. E., 2 men and 1,woman, with a
preference of I man; Brethren, 1 man
I and 2 women; Greek Orthodox, 3 men;'
Mennonite, 2 women; and minor re-
ligious groups, 7 men and 3 women,
with a preference of 2 men. {
New Board
The board of trustees of the Stu-
dents' Christian association for the
coming year was announced yester-

Bunting and Prof. Leroy Waterman
Disciples, Prof. Louis A. Hopkins; Ej
iscopalian, Mrs. A. H. Lloyd, Prof. C
W. Patterson, and Prof. M. P. Tilley
Lutheran, Mrs. E. C. Stellhorn an
Mr. Albert Fiegel; Methodist, Mrs.
H. Kraus, Prof. J. R. Brumm, Messr
T. E. Leland and H. B. Earhart; Pre
byterian, Mrs. M. McD. Stewart, D
[arren E. Forsythe,' Prof. James
E Edmonson, and Prof. W. C. Hoad; U:
itarian, Prof. J. F. Shepard; at larg
Mrs. E. H. Sunderland and Messi
Louis E. Ayres, Arthur E. Gilman am
I Frank E Royce; ex-officio, Hugh VG
Hitchcock, '22, 'president of the men
department. Miss Elizabeth Hutc
ens, president of the women's depar
meet.
Officers of the boaid are: Pro
Louis A. Hopkins, chairman; M
Frank E. Royce, treasurer; and M
Thomas E. Evans, executive secr
tary.
Of these 21 officers, the terms
seven expire in 1922, seven in 1923, an
seven in 1924.
NO MONEY BROUGHT IN SO
FAR BY CORPORATION TA
No money has been added to t I
.state treasury by the new corpor
tion tax so far. Several corporation
have made returns but none have be
entered and collected.
UNPAID SUBSCRIPTIONS
Th~ose who havre' subscribed
for The Wolverine but have not
paid for it should either mail
$1 to The Wolverine,- Press
building, or leave that amount
at the office, second floor,'Press
building. Office hours 8:30 to
12, and 1:30 to 5 o'clock.
DELIVERY

Way of Perfuming .1

i
C
e
"t
3
r
l
,
.
r
L
,

IIGH" STANDARDS CAUSE
DECREASE IN STUDY OF LAWP
In explaining why the graduates in
law at the University of Iowa have
diminished in nuinbers some 50 per-
cent within the last 40 years, Dean
Dudley O. McGovney attributes it to
the maintenance of higher standards
set everywhere by the members of
the bar themselves.
The efficacy of this is evidenced by
the fact that now practically all grad-
uates hang out their shingles, whereas
in the early days only 50 percent
took up law practice. Where former-
ly no collegiate preparation was re-
quired to take the nine months law
course, two years of general collegiate
work is a prerequisite for the three
year course in law.

and Flaconnettes

Subscribers of The Wolver
who are not receiving their
mer regularly on Tues
T>sds, and Saturdaya,
ncon or who have compla
rn t the delivery, are
'e'1 to call the business
f e, t,'lephone 960.

.JEURS

L'ORIGAN
CHYPIE
STYX
(Coiy)

h' .. ,... i.--....T.-, --
. . /.
.. 1

with just the required'
mediate use.

old barn in England, near, where Wil-
liam Penn is burled. It is said that
one of the original owners of the
ship used it for this purpose after it
was broken up in 1624.
SCENTS ILLICIT ARIAE
"FALSTAFF" CLAIMS WOLVERINE
'BLEATS" FOR CONSTRUCTIVE
nrr~rmrfrt'.'n

SECOND-

HAND

BOOKS

F OR ALL DEPARTMENTS
SUMMER 'SCHOOL STUDENTS will find the Right Prices at

Quarry
I Prescription Store
rsity Ave. and So. State St.
PHONE 308
ClaudeDrake, Prop.

I
1
c

-uw,
\ww

A

H

R

U N I V E R SI
BOOK STOla

i

. r ,--"--r

rim

Ser

J3 E
isen ger

rvice
r
gest Ball
for danc- 0
and
v for

CRITiCiSLt
Editor The Wolverine:
The Union has taken The Wolver-
ine into partnership. Each is grow-
ing lachymose over the tribulations
of the other. The tears flow and con-
fidences are exchanged. It reminds
one of the time of the barroom and
the brass rail.
Several days since I wrote what I
thought about the'tap room service f
at the Union. Now the Union and its
acolyte, The Wolverine, bleat out that
my criticism was, not constructive. Of
cours, it wasn't; constructive criti-
cism is tb.at which aims to build onI
a rotten foundation. Constructive
criticism never gecomplished any-
thing. If you disbejeye this, look
into your history books, 'Voltaire did
more in a lifetime than a tjsand U
Bryans would in a million years,
,bjects to Geraniums
My statements were drastic because
it does no good to salve over criti-f
cism with a mouthful49 f compliments.I
No one is going to 'sniff &.granium
that is hidden In an armful of roses,
especially if one ditlikes the odor of
geraniums.
I did not accuse the Union of graft,j
as The Wolverine intimates. It i U
more apt to be mismanagement. The
University really ought to give a
course in restaurant managing,
Tap Room Supports a Lot -
.The Wolverine says that the Union
has to support much; the instiitution
as a whole, the students working
there, etc., etc. Apparently the tap
room is standing for- the whole busi-
ness.
I made no charge that the tap room
charges more than th' other res-
taurants about town. The prices, I
believe, are much the same; but then,
Ann Arbor restaurateurs are notably
a bunch of high-biadors. One can
get identically the same food at lit-
tle more than half the price in either
Detroit or Jackson. And the De-
troit resturants do not pretend to be
altruistic nor charitable establish-
ments. They are in business, very -

-Again we present an event for men that is

remarkable that it will go far toward enhancing
the reputation of this store for value-giving.

so

All Men's - Young Men's Suits from
Special Sale Shirts, collar attached
. All other Shirts greatly reduced
B. V. Dstyle Men's Underwear

to tale advatage of J. F. Wuerth Co.'s Grea
Sale of Fashion Park Spring and Summer Suits

S2up

98c

m. for

ids and Suburban Lines, Fare, $1.50
>andusky, Fare including ferry, 1.75
urning same day
Holidays, $1.25 Round trip.
visit the Caves, Perry's Monument,
her attractions, several Hotels.
antic City; Large Hotels, Board Walk,
erry for Sandusky. Leave Sandusky
ay 4:30 p. m. Arr. in Detroit 8:00p.m.
Ashley & Dustin Stea-rer Line
Foot of First St. Detroit, Mi6.

79C

Night Shirts -Pajamas

less s5%
25%/ less

Straw Hats and Bathing Suits

Hen, you owe it to yourselves
to come here before you buy

f

".

I1"

F. Wuerh

Coo

I

Next to Wuerth theatre
.. ... .... ... .... .-. -.. .

'I

I

I

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