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June 05, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

._.__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - ll - -IIIII.I -

.y Afternoons.

f signed, the signatures
ut as an, evidence of
ied in 'The Wolverine
iled to the office.
o consideration. No
r encloses postage.
rse the sentiments ex-

F

...... ....Managing Editor
NTS
th Gwennyth Wrentmore
George E. Sloan
STAFF
o'or 374
...Business Manager
LNTS
prnan Don Allen
Edward Stark
LY 5, 1921
-L. A. KERN
RICKLE
n, for a number of years
in . enrollment, and has
ber of cursesoffered.
:aon term stands now,
e past, at the top amion,
-oeges and universities
'he development of this
ity is certainly a tribute,
hemiselves who so f re-
ing the vacation months
o to the Summer school
of 'whose members has
the quality and amount

toil is to be regarded as the instrument by which
we develop, if labor is to be considered as the
means through which we foster and maintain an
intelligence and by which we make life worth living,
then certainly toil must have some sanctity. Intel-
ligence itself, in fact, is as worthless without an
erpenditure of effort through which it may become
of value as labor is without intelligence to guide it,
and ultimately it is simply through use, through
work. that real intelligence is fostered and developed.
But, after all, this is simply a haggling over the'
technicality of a phrase. Anyone knows that the
man who has no feeling for what President Burton
sees fit to call the "sanctity of toil" is either a mere
machine or a selfish hoarder. Call it what you will,
the laborer without a feeling for and an interest in
his work is not worth the powder and lead it would
take to blow him up.
A BUILDER RETIRES
To those who, in past years, have seen anything
.of the workings of the economics department of the
University, the recent resignation of Prof. Henry
Carter Adams means much. 'It means a loss to the
University, and it means, moreover, that a place is
left vacant which no other person will ever be able
adequately to fill.
Professor Adams' work at Michigan has been of
a type .to reflec't credit not only on the institution
but upon the whole United States as well. His suc-
cess in establishing an accounting system for Amer-
ican railroads, and in working out a system of
accounting suitable for use on Chinese transporta-
tion lines has been especially notable. He is an
authority on the subject of economics, an author, a
scholar, and has probably done as much as any,
other one map to help make Michigan what she'is.
Others may follow Professor Adams; others may
take up and, continue the work hie has begutn; but
no one will ecver be able to fill his place exactly as
he has done. Professor A=dams' chair in active serv-
ice is left vacant, but MVichigan is just that much
bigger and better because of his having occtupied it.
Allow us to suggest that the feet of' Sutmmer
school students are as damaging to Michigan's cam-
pus grass as those of the "regulars"?

0

HIGH CLASS FOOD
Served at CHUBB'S
on State St. opposite Lane Hall
FAILINGS'
DINING ROOMS
$7.00 per Week-3 Meals
$6.00 per Week-2 Meals
ROIE COOKING
Electric" Fans
Cool, "Ventilated Rooms
714 M N R0 E STREET
East of Cutting's Flats,
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT todevery custom-
er, whether the account be large
or 'small.%
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources......$5,000,000.00
707 North University Ave.
Northwest Cor. Main '& Huron
For Home-Cooked Meals

bm

Take a

I

I

K A H A M
TWO CO L L
0 W. A

KODAK
with Y
Photography the Kodak way is less ex;
than you think-and any Kodak is sim
work-we can readily show you how eas
Autographic Kodaks from $8.oo up'
21Mo nies $2.00 up

ou

np

G "T0
tiH .A m

. ES6
both Uj
Dia~ou

I ZdeADH m Watr190F
The Ideal, Hot Weather' Fooi

Unr

Ic

I'1

:REA

I

IPreferred By Students and
'Towns -people

TRY TUTTLES

Others' Opinions

s, graduates
afe starting
work in the
regular stu-
: commenda-'
:ation period
wcomers we
Nish that the
be all that is
;elatter per-
agement, we
vantages of
tiersof Ann
For the rest,

een perspiratory
"sWill weigh the
,gainst the disad-
ne for the latter
e not responsible

NTION

alities occurring on
>us, steps for safe-
- taken hereabouts.
illed and another
or street car just
en Jefferson street
st week. an almiost
occurred in front
in the death of one
nd the injury of a
ision to cross State
nows how the Ann
h of track .between
It is small wonder
the only marvel is
selves occasionally

QUESTIONING THE SANCTITY OF TOIL
(The Chicago Tribune)
President Burton of the University of Michigan
impresses upon his graduating class the sanctity of
labor. He asserts that the principle that "every
human being is of supreme worth is the founda-
tion of democracy. Most men, he says, can be
judged by their attitude toward work,"the essence
of existence, the vital test to which civilization puts
each person."
Repetition has made such statemehts orthodoxj
doctrine for baccalaureate sermons. It would be
heresy of the worst sort for a college president to,
tell a group of young men going out into the world
that they ought to avoid labor and live by their wits.
But after fall, are we not deceiving and handicap-
ping our young collegians unfairly by such talk
about the "sanctity of toil"?
The- best ditch digger we ever knew, if headed
west from Chicago, would have made the dirt fly
clear to the Rocky mountains if not stopped by a
plainly marked line or by some impassable barrier.
He knew nothing about the sanctity of toil. He
had no illusions. All he knew was how to dig. If
"every human being is of supreme worth," this
man was as valuable as the man who directed his
efforts and limited them to the excavation for a
foundation and cellar of a house. But in reality
he was not as valuable. Undirected, the fruits of
his toil would have been destruction.
Young men go to college to fit themselves not
for toil but to direct toil into productive channels.
Without such direction probably nine-tenths of the
labor in the world would be wasted. It has been
estimated that without the labor-saving machinery
now in existence this globe couldl not support its
population, no matter how diligently every individ-
ual worked. Yet no college president tells us that
the machine which thus supplements and extends
the possibilities of the worker is sacred.
The fact is that there is nothing noble in labor
itself. Quite the reverse is true. If a man dis-
carded pick and shovel and set to digging a ditch
with his hands, he would increase his labor,
decrease its product, and brand himself an idiot.
If, on the other hand, he discarded' pick and shovel
and invented a ditch-digging machine which would
reduce his physical effort and increase his results,
we would do him honor and give him reward.
It is not toil, bnt intelligence,, which is sacred.
The young men instructed by Dr. Burton probably
know this. If they do not know it now, they will
learn it quickly when they see the comparative
rewards of stolid labor and of intelligent mental'
effort.
It is time the old platitudes were dropped from
baccalaureate sermons and the college curriculum
in general. If the world is to improve and progress
it must do so through the success of its leaders.
It is a waste of time and an unnecessary handicap
to tell young men who are in line to become such
leaders of thought and action that "every human

On Maynard .Street, 1-2 Block South
of Majesic Theatre
.. buys a brand.
_a 5 Vnew corona
portabl Ety e-
writer. Other makes
at attractive prices.
See usbeforeyou buy.
T YPEWRITERS
of leading makes bought, sold,
rented, exchanged, cleaned and
repaired.
0. D. MORRILL.
117 Nickels Arcade

W E BELIEVE you will find here yo
bank. And a bank that every
like better

StopInat the
Fountain of
YOuth
And Cool off:
Refreshing Sodas and
Home-Made Candies
Corner State and
E. Liberty

Farmers & Mect
101-105 SO. MAIN STREET

330

Member of the Federal Reserve

I

a. .

11

WATERMAN
SWA]
Silver and Gold ZVLRI
Pencils FYNE
ALARM CLOCKS
Hailer & Fuller
State Sreetiewlers

'SARP
POINT

Keep Cool:--
Step into one of our Palm Beach
Suits today and forget the,
hot weather; priced
$15J o $25
J. KARL MALCOLM,60 E. S

, 1
N

Summer School
Stu den t$
for.
Fountain Refreshments
and Fine Candies
visit
The Vetsy Ross Shop
The Fountain Room ,eautiful

f '

, '

13-15 Nickle'sArcade

within a few
lmost on the

PREPARE

For your tires, repairs
and storage see Cadillac
Garage Co, and benefit
by their Quick S ervice

com-

to a r
>n the
e crazy

east and
antics of

for
Commerial
T eaching.

ITY
ial from the
Marion I.
"sanctity of
to the grad-
n, quartered,
re is nothing
:orial writer.
ra

Summer Term
July 5 - Aug. 26

Cadillac Garage Co.
327 South Main Street
Julus E. Schmit, Prop.

4:,

er sense,
Tribune
in labor

' HAMILTON
Business College
State and Willam Ann Arbor

being is of supreme worth." They are not. Their
comparative worth will be revealed by the fruits
of their toil, not by the toil itself.

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