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August 12, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-08-12

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 12, 1920.

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V HAS TO

PROFE~SSOR FRIDAY
CANCELLS LECTURE
Prof. David Friday of the depart-
ment of political science who was
scheduled to speak Friday afternoonl
on "The Present Industrial Situation,'
has cancelled the lecture.
The reason for his action is that he
has been teaching at Columbia uni-
versity in New York City during the
summer' and is unable to return in
time to fill the engagement. In his
place there will be shown three reels
of educational motion pictures. All
other lectures for the week will be the
same as previously announced.
The last number on the program of
summer lectures for this year will be
a reading by Mr. Ray K. Immel's
class in Shakespearean' reading of
selections from "As You Like It." This
will be given in Sarah Caswell Angel!l
hill next Tuesday evening.
WRITE MIN'ERALOGY11
Kraus, Dean of Summer Session, and
Professor Hunt, Collaborate oji
New Text Book

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PLANS DRJIVE TO DETERMINE
CITY'S DEMAND FOR
HELP
MEN, DESIRING WORK,
SHOULD RETURN E ARLY
Positions Will be Found for Appli.
cants Here, in Detroit, and
Elsewhere

The Men's Educational club had its
final meeting of the year yesterday
afternoon on Ferry field.
There' was a ball game between he
superintendents of schools and mem-
bers of the ed~cational faculty, which
was followed by refreshments consist-
ing of ginger ale and doughnuts. The
scheduled watermelon feed had to be
cancelled because of the inability to
secure the melons.
After the refreshments theI men
went to the bleachers where Hon. T.
E. Johnson, state superintendent of
public instruction, spoke for 30 min-
utes, outlining the legislation program
of the state department of edueation,

_ __ .
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problem of Americaniza-
in dealing intellgiently
percent of the population
ast in knowledge, intellig-1
orldly goods. The truths1
s and sociology must be
his class before the mod-
s can be eliminated. This
v set forth by Prof. C. S.
ie department of educa-
cture-yesterday afternoon
e Problems of American-
en by an Army Psycho -

Johnson Outlines School Program;
Errorless Game Marks Faculty Win

Levels of Intelligence
e two levels of intelligence
.ntry, according to Profes-
each of which is served by'
cial institutions, with lit-
ngling of the two levels.
encies of education-books,
newspapers, the thoughts
and preachers-reach onlyj
level. The lower level is
influence of the agiftator
dical. The school has not
tor because the people of
leave school before the,
conomics and sociology is,

.ON NEXT
SMUSIC P

FIRST EDITION TO COME OFF
PRESS EARLY IN SEPTEMBER
The mineralogy, which Profs. E. H.
Kraus and W. T. Hunt of the mineral-
ogical department have prepared, will
be off.the press some time in Septem-
ber. The book is an introduction to
study of minerals and crystals.
In the preparation of this work an
attempt was made on the part of the
authors to givet he subject matter in

The employ ment secretary of the
University "Y' employment bureau is
making plans for a drive among the
business establishments and other
places that may need student help tc
determine the demand for student em-
ployment this fall.
Last year the bureau reported 2.414
jobs given out, with an estimated cash
value of $95,400. The cash jobs offer-
ed usually consist of clerical, general
office, stenographic work, factory
'work, waiting tables, and odd jobs.
It is thought that the coming year
with a better organization of the work
by the employmient bureau that a
greater number of jobs can be found.
Students, desiring work, especially
board or rooms for service, should be
in Ann Arbpr several days before
school opens. Application for em-
ployment should be made to the em-
ployment secretary, Lane hall.
Should Phone Secretary
Those, who desire to employ stu-
dents, should addeiss or phone all
communications to the employment
secretary. The bureau is prepared to
supply and place students in jobs in
Ann Arbor, Detroit, and other sur-
rounding territory. Every detail
should be given concerning the kind'
of work to 'be done and the length of
time required for service.

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Special by Wireless to The Wolverine
(By U. Guessit)
In a diamond contest that remind-
ed one of a world series game-it was
so different-the faculty succeeded
in downing the superiitendents of
schools in baseball after a hard
fought, extra inning contest by the
score of 19 to 2. The game was
heated from the start.
On account of close fielding no errors
were unable to get their hands on the
were unableto get their hands on the
ball, which is a requisite in making
an error.I
The outstanding star of the contest
was the faculty's center fielder, C. T.
Edmondson. It is said that he en-
couraged his pitcher more than any
man by his unceasing line of taunts
at the opposing batters.
Babe Ruth was emulated when An-
derson, the faculty catcher laid
down a perfect bunt and the opposing
pitcher, thinging a runner was on
the way home, lost the ball in the
grandstand which allowed Anderson
to make a complete circle of the
bases.
The superintendents' two scores
could not 'be accounted for except
that the scorer forgot and marked
them down, when they were made.
The above report of the game was
given to the special. correspondent
by Professor Myers,

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which will be presentedto the legisla
ture at its coming session. h
He asked the co-operation and sup-
port of the schoolmen present in hav-
ing this program adopted.
The plan proposed by Mr. Johnson
deals primarily with the improvement
of rural schools, and would provide a
county board of education . with a
county superintendent and assistant,
superintendents, which would be ap-
pointed by the board.
The program also calls for an equal-
izing of the tax burden for the support
of education, so that even those
school districts, which have a small
amount of taxable property will be
able to maintain good schools.
192 UMRSESSION
STUDENT BODY IS LARGER AND
MORE MATURE, DEAN KRAUS,
BELIEVES

up the living system
hey were given higher
n they could demand~
higher. They fail tol
late the problems.
lize that if the world
faces starvation, and
tion is 'eakened by
serve of capital.
ice Exists
nit that injustice ex-
the way to solve it,"
said. pointing to the
ave not realized the
nication between the
er levels. He urged
n of teachers be mod-
s of studies in pub-
anged that the teach-
and economics may
he large number who

ANNOUNCED LIST DOES N
CLUDE MAY FESTIVA
NUMBERS
6 RECITALS IN CHOR
UNION GROUP PLAN
Leading Stars From 4tr(
Opera First; Marine Band
Come Here' .In Fall
Eleven concerts by some
world's best artists and organ:
in addition to the six May
concerts have been announced
University Sch'ool of Music :

I

such a way that it may be easily
grasped by beginning students in min-
eralogy. To facilitate this there have
been a number of marked departures
from ther usual methods employed in.
getting out a book of this kind.
Presents Various Factors
In begiwnig the study an attempt
'was made by the authors to get the
student interested in the book by pre-
senting various interesting factors
that mineralogy gives in relation to
regular life.
Another important change is the
substitution of photographs and cuts
of actual models of crystals' and min-
erals, such as are studied in the lab-
oratory. This makes it easy for a stu-
dent to recognize the cuts in the
book as being things he has studied
in practical work. These cuts, which
are very good, were obtained by the
co-operation of Mr. George Swain,
technical expert in photography at
the University, and Dr. George F.
Kunz.

he army intelligence
trative of the two lev-
nce in which individ-
:esor Berry said that
wn of the number of
ountry physically and
le of military servicel
k of the war. Amer-
sts evolved a plan for
ntal efficiency that was
1 the draft camps and
and, later the system
iminations Given '
ations were given, the
erates and the "Beta"
All men who had
fo th grade of school
first examination. Men
examination and those
m wasso limited that
ble to read and write
ied on Page 4)

Treats Precious Stones,
There is also a tr'eatment of gems
and precious stones and a discussion
of minerals and their uses.
In order that the human touch
might be introduced. into the book,
photographs and sketches of promin-
ent mineralogists are given. There
are 15 of these in the book and also
a set of determinative table-'.
The book is the culmination of ten,
years of work along this# line and*
some of the chapters are based on
material that Professor Kraus gives
in his "Essentials of Crystallography,"
while the descriptions of the miner-
als are from his "Descriptive Miner-
alogy.,
School Committe
Goes To Toledo

't'alent lisplayed
At 'Final Concert
(H. C.)
E~xceptional talent was displayed
last night when the faculty of the
School of Music gave its last concert
of the summer in Hill aditorium. The
first number on the program was
rendered by a trio composed of E. N.
Bilbie, violin, M. C. Wier, violin 'cello,
and Mrs. George B. Rhead, piano.
They played Mendelssohn's Trio in D-
minor. The movEment of this difficult
piece was fast and light, the violin
'cello starting the theme while the
violin joined in with the melody a few
bars later.
Carl Lindegren, appeared twice on
the, program and won much applause
from the audience by his rich and full
basso voice. His first number, "0 tu
Palermo" by Verde, was followed by
a series of songs that were rendered
in a sympathetic and interpretive
way. Mr. Lindegren concluded his
song group wit'h Kipling's "Barrack
Ballad.",
Both Mr. Bilbie and Mr. Wier ap-
peared again on the program as solo-
ists. "In Autumn," the first of two
pieces by Mr. Bilbie,. was of his own
composition and displayed his unusu-
ally careful technique, combined with
a deep sense of feeling. His last
piece, "Danse Furieusp" was striking-
ly fantastic and in extraordinarily
quick time. Mr. Bilbie was recalled
many times by the audience, but was
unable to give encores because of a
lame arm. Mr. Wier's rendition of,
Max Bruch's "Kol Nidert" concluded.
the varied program.T
BIOLOG DESCRIBES DIFFERENT
STATIONS IN UNITED STATES
The Biolog for Aug. 7, issued by
students of the Biological station at
Douglas Lake, is given over in main
to a description of the different sta-j
tions throughout the country. Al
special feature of the issue is a map
of the United States, with the various
stations ,lesignated on it.
INDUSTRIAL, EDUCATORS''OF
DETROIT ATTENID LAST MEET
L. Lewis Hayes and F. P. Keppler,
teachers in the industrial.educational
classes in Detroit, were in the city
Wednesday and attended the final
meeting of the Men's Educafional
club.

The present Summer isesion is the
best that the"Uni versity has ever had,
according to Dean E. H. Kraus.
This is true both as to size and the
character of the students, for severa?
hundred more students are enrolled
than last year's record. There has
been in attendance also a more ma-
ture and influential group of students
than ever before and the faculty
seems to have a greater interest in
its work, according to the dean.
Program Good
The program of special lectures has
been made up of specialists and men
of a national reputation. 'Ac'cording
to followers of music the programs of,
the faculty of the School of Music that
,ave been given each *Wednesday
night in Hill auditorium have been of
a higher class than heretofore.
The increased enrollment has in no
way clogged up the efficiency of the
school work as ample provision was
made for a large registration and in
no case have the sections been over-
crowded.
rwust Emphasize Values
Dean Kraus believes that students
of the regular session do not appre-
ciate the value of attending a summer
term. The benefits to be derived from
a summer spent here must be em-
phasized a great deal more strongly
he said. There are valuable gains
that may be secured during a Sum-'
mer session that are not to (be had
during the regular year he believes.
TENNIS TITLE GOES
TO SANCHEZ '23 E.
F. Sanchez, '23E, ,)on the Summer
session tennis torunament yesterday,
afternoon after a hard contest with
Tom Beddow. The first set went 9-7,
with Beddow pressing the victor hard,
and Beddow played such a 'good
game in the second set that Sanchez
lost to him, 4-6.
In the next two sets Sanchez came
back, however, and' easily defeated his
opponent 6-2, 6-4. For his victory over
the other contestants in the tourna-
ment, Sanchez, who was favored from
the first, will receive a dozen tennis
balls, to be awarded by George Moe.
As runner-ut Beddow will receive a
half dozen tennis balls.
KNODE SCORES TWICE, AND,
GETS SAFE HIT YESTERDAY

UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
COME HERE FROM COLDWATER,
'AND THEN GO TO DE-
TROIT!
The H. M. H. airservice, which has
been travelling over the central por-
tion of the country taking up pass -
engers, will be in Ann Arbor Fridaj.
The service is made up of three Uni-
versity men, Harold C. Heym, '21,
James Morrison, '21E, and Oliver J.
Hall, '23E.
Land in Field
A field at Platt's crossing on the
Packard street road between here and
Ypsilanti, wil be used 'to make land-
ings. Heyn and Hall only .will be.
here as Morr'ison is in Ohio, heading
towards Indiana. Persons will tak-
en up for $12.50 a piece, and if fancy
flying is yvished, an additional price
must be paid.
Heym was a naval aviation officer
at Pensacola, Pla., during the war.
He bears the title of R. N. A. and F.
A. I. 'Hall was pilot for the king of
Belgium on the war front. His title!
being R. M. A., F. A. I., and R. A. F.
The men will -have a Curtiss plane.
- Come From Coldwater
They come here from Coldwater,
having started at Chicago right after I
school closed in June and having.
made flights at various places be-
tween here and there since. From
here they, will go to Detroit. Flights'
will be made at various places until
the last, of September when the men
will return to. school. The men are
students of aeronautical engineering
and are taking this means of gaining
experience.
REEVES GOES T4Is CH NEAUX
ISLANDS .AS HALL RETURNS I

coming year.
In the Choral Union series, six
grams will be given, the first of w~
will behOct. 29 by six leading
pany. Verdi and Ruccini operas
be rendered by Giovanni Martit
i Rafael Diaz, tenors; Nina Morg
Marie Rappold, sopranos; He
Marsh, contralto, and Thomas Ch;
jers, bass.
Sergei Rashmaninoff, renov
pianist and composer, will come
the second concert on thie evenin
Nov. 11. On Dec. 13, Jan Kubclik
eminent voilinist who has- not
1heard in this country since his
of seven years ago,' will make~
nn Arbor debut.
Orchestra Concerts Billed
After the.Christmas vacation t
orchestra concerts will be prov
two by the Detroit Symphony orc
tra under the direction of Ossip
rilowitsch on Jan. 24 and Mar. 7,
one by the Minneapolis Symphony
chestra, under Emil Oberhoffer, I
24. The soloist for the Minneal
orchestra has not been announced
at the first date Albert Lockwood
be the piano soloist .and Marcia
Dresser, ap 'opera soprano, will
pear for the .second Detroit orche
appearance.
In the second annual Extra Con
series a fine list of attractions
been provided, the first of which
be Nov. 4 with the appearance
Lieut. Albert Spaulding, one of
premier American violinists and
ing the war an American aviator
Marine Band Comes
Special interest wil center in
second concert in the .series w
will be by the United. States Ma
band Nov. 13, the evening of the
cago-Michigan game. The Chan
of Commerce has secured a guara
of the band's appearance at this t
Directing the organization, 'which
played at every presidential ina ug
since 1801, is Capt. William Sar
man, at its head for 22 years.
On Dec. 2, Percy Grainger, the
brated pianist who has never be
appeared in Ann Arbor will be he
He is wellnknown as a composer
his works have often been include
festival and other programs.
The Flonzaley string quartet, re
nized~ as the finest string quartet;.
appear Jan. 10. This organiza
has been heard many times in
Arbor in the pre-festival series
its performances are flawless.
organization consists of Adolfo B
first violin; Alfred Pochon, sec
(Continued on Page 4)
W1AF' S GOING ON

4V*

cessful

Ray
each

at has been con-
K. Immel's class
day of the week
a'ccording to Mr.
Tiers of the class
Iren,, who have
d. In this way it
tell stories in a
erest the children
d what ones re-
ty response frbm
re from six to.

Prof. H. A. Riggs, Mr. Ray K. Hol-
land, and Mrs. E. H. Kraus, members.
of the building coimittee of the Ann
Arbor board of education, together
with Superintendent of School] L. A.
Bullis, will go to Toledo Thursday to
inspect the school buildings of that
city.
The group is taking numerous trips
to cities in southern Michigan 'and
neighboring states with an idi of
getting plans for buildings. They
have visited Holly, Flint, Pontiac, and
Highland Park within the last few
days and they plan to go to Detroit
in a day or so.
These trips are made with the idea
of building new schools in this city,
since the city approved last June a
$750,000 building program. It will in-
volve new grade schools in several
sections of the city. "'

Prof. J. S. Reeves of the- political
science department, has lift with his
family for Hessel in the Clieneaux Is-
lands, where he will spend a brief per-
iod vacationing.
Registrar Arthur G. Hall has been
in these islands for the past several
weeks with his family. He is expect-
ed in Ann Arbor the latter part of this
week.
Prof, W. D. Henderson, head of the
extension department, will also be in4
the city this week end after a vaca-
tion.
COURTIS, OF DETROIT, SPEAKS
TO THREE EDUCATION CLASSES

August 12
5 p. m.-Income Tax Procedure.
W. A. Paton.
7 p. m.-Educational motion pict
8 p. m.-The Element of Beauty
the Public Standpoint, Miss E
Gratton, room 205, Enginee
building. Art exhibition of stud
in public art work follows from
10 o'clock.

S. A. Courtis of Detroit,
the combined classes in"

r the class went on the
his proved popular. The
as given at 2 o'clock to-
hours, which have been

In Wednesday's game between St. G. L. Jackson, J1 B. Edm
Louis and Philadelphia, which went H. W. Anderson at 8 ap
to the Cardinals by a 19 to 8 score, Thursday morning.
Kenneth Knode, '20H, was at bat of-I. At 8 o'clock he spoke on
ficially. three times, delivered a safe ity and Reliability of]
hit, and scored two runs. He handled Tests." A 9 o'clock he
his one chance, in right field suceess "Some Uses of Reading
fully.*, Teaching."

lectured to
education of
ondson, and
d 9 o'clock
the "Valid-
Educational
spoke on
Tests in

5
8

August 13
p. m.-Educational Motion' p
p. m.-Spanish Gypsy Folk
(Illustrated with Victrola),
C. P. Wagner.
A,,no,...,.S1a

August 16
5 p. m.--Subject and lect
nounced.
August 17
8 p. m.-Recital. The CI

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