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August 12, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-08-12

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Editorial Comment

LIVERY

DO YOU NE

UDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER;
OFr. THLE UNIVERSITY OY MICHIGAN.
'uesday, Thursday, and Saturday Afternoons.
\nn Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
nes: Business, 969; Editorial, 2414.
OFFICE HOURS:
.o Daily; x :3o to 5:oo Daily, except Saturday. ?
is not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signatures
to be published in print, but as an evidence of
s of events will be published in The Wolverine
of the Editor, if left or mailed to the offic~e.
niunications will receive no consideration. N9.
be returr.ed unless the writer. encloses postage.
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
>mmunications.
r. SARGENT, Jr................Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or iso.
.ILLERY......................IBusiness Manager
Phone 960 or 2738.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS
Xnan John J. Hamel, Jr. Robert S. Kersey
ISSUE EDITORS

Hamilton Cochran'

;' f.

IN EDITOR~

THURSDAY, AUGUST 12, 1920.
SCHOLARSHIPS UNPOPULAR?
e eligible to compet'e for scholarships a
:ent offer their names. Notwithstanding
kat the chances of winning are.excellent,
ity of those who enter being successful,
as to be no such for the prizes. The reas-
e is hard to ascertain, as the scholarships
cally limited to graduate students, and
is, that any p rson who returns to school
luating must be more than usually inter-
:curing a broad education. We may ,infer
ig the graduate student there are lofty
rho scorn money, apathetic ones who don't
perhaps, still others who are afraid to
re the fittest win out. Or it may be that
gnorant of what isoffered. Know then,
are ten University schalarships for three
ollars each, and five for five hundred dol-
With more students competing for the
>se who win the scholarships will have a
stinetion for having'achieved something.
ike everything else, is comparative.-
NEWSPAPER "MORALITY
:arly stages of newspaper deyelopment, it
ie been questioned whethw newspapers
ity, lut with the in.creasing conception of
s and purposes of journalism, it is appar-
iere is no longer much ground for such a
When newspapers first began bitter com-r
ie keen fights for news scoops often caus-
o resort to underhand methods of secur-
nformation, and'ir especially dull periods
en the cutsom to fake stories, Later, an-
se of this type of journalism appeared
advedt of yellow journalism, particularly
stic o, th e Hearst papers. Too often did
fail to get all the points of a story and con-
published untruths or partial truths.
nd sex stories were unduly played up for
:s, arid glaring head lines told of rather
>penings. In many cases the newspapers
demands on their reporters as to how a
secured, except that they get it. All of
gs tended to make newspapers which did
good- reputations, and the newspapers
ng the first to discover this sand to cor-
ways.-
>oner did the leading newspapers find that
mrges must be made if they were, t, con-.
ublic favor, than they set about to mend
s. With this realization, which came into
about twenty years ago, but which. such
reeley -and Dana felt in the early stages
ism, theedeveloedta generallyrrecogniz-
aper morality. The very things,- which
:terized the newspapers before 1900 were
> be put on the blacklist, and soon there
ip a code of ethics,,which is yet being
The underhand methods of the previous
e frowned upon; the lurid stories began
less conspicuous places, and records f
bievements were accorded the places of
ae news columns, and most papers began
work for the public good. It is now a
-ery journal's ethics to get -all the facts
an honorable way. Very seldom is there
nal coloring- of the news, and the public
acknowledges 'that it is getting the news
course there are yet a few papers, which
to the archaic methods of journalism.
ity of the newspapers of today realize
that lies in them. They know that the
.n be helped through their editorial and
nns, and they are endeavoring to live up
sponsibilities.
:h things as these that make newspaper
They now have a recognized code of
ith includes fair play for all, and this>'
loped morality, which, however, has been
rking its way to the surface for years, is
ecognized. The alarity with which peo-
the stat ments of the' newspapers, both
orial and news columns, is substantial
newspaper morality of .the highest type
t d

TEACHERS' SALARIES
Through nearly'all-time members of the uni-
versity faculty have been shockingly underpaid, and
the only reasonable criticism respecting the ad-
vances recently granted is that they were so long
delayed!t
That is the plain,_ blunt truth.
-Other universities have been offering higher
compensation and breaking in disastrously upon
our teaching force; but even in the absence of that
circumstance, salaries here, as a rule, have been un-
fairly low. It wi require many years of advanced
pay to equalize the losses and the sacrifices of the
long years past.
We in Wisconsin should be willing to pay justly
for brains,-and that we have not begi doing to
teachers of any kind anywhere. Artesans whose
trades can be learned in a fortnight, as painters, in
a few months as carpenters, plumbers, electricans,
and steamfitters, often have been better paid than
men and women with college educations requiring
at least four yers of study after the high school
period ! No words can be too strong for condemna-
tion of this outrageous situation, and no praise can
be too high for regents and school boards that now.
even though tardily, are placing this profession of
teaching through decent compensation, on a high
and deserved basis.
We all should be ashamed beyond measure for
our contemptible procrastination in a matter so im-
portant.1
The sound action regarding the university in-
strmctional force should be extended at once univer-
sally throughout every branch of education in all the,
.states.
Starvation wages to the instructors of our girls
and boys are no longer to be sanctioned in Wiscon-
sin, thanks to a deeply awakened 'public conscience
In no manner may our taxes be so advatageously
expended as inthemaking of the best quality of c
izenship, and that is precisely what our teachers are
doing.-MIadison, Wis., Democrat.
FACTORYLABOR ON THE FARM
Searching a few months ago for a glint df silver
in the cloud of labor troubles which overshadowed
the farms ofhe nation, we thought we had found
it in the factories which wer turning out tractors
and other improved farm machinery at an unpre-
cedented rate. Seeing at the time no better way to
lighten the gloom of the farmers, we pointed eut
'that the laborer drawn from the farm to the factory
eventually would send back to the farm a machine
which would do twice the work which he hadbeen
able to do.
That assertion provoked a broadside,, of protest
from the farms. Rural correspondents threw down
their pit~hforks and picked up lead pencils to in-
form us that we knew nothing about the farmer or
his problems. They advised us with rustic simplic-
ity of speech that if we had nothing wiser or more
comforting than that to say we had better keep still.
We were silenced, if not convinced.
It is comforting to ;us, therefore,if not to the
farmer, to note that one of the high lights of Arthur
Evans' careful observation in six agricultural states
has been upon the overcoyning of labor shortage by
improved farming machinery. Writing from Aber-
deen, S. D., he says: "The farmer here seems to be
reaching the point, through te -use of more and bet-
ter machinery, where he is less and less dependent
upon. migratory labor during the harvest rush."
This observation is typical of that in the other states
visited. It is a sign of the times.
Bright lights, high wages and short hours may-
be the attraction which takes the laborer from the
farm to the city. Demand for his services is what'
holds him there, This demand is in part due to the
need of factory products on the farms. It may
mean a slow adjustment, but it does mean adjust-
ment.--The Chicago Tribune.
The captain of Shamrock IV sailed for homeon
the' Baltic. He ,culdn't, get a stateroom on the
good ship Alibi.
Bob Martin's no longer the champion. He's mar-
ried.

Abaft the News
Our laboring classes are starving, starving for,
something to buy. The profiteer is dodging all the
time. Dodging the dollhrs that our hardworked
laborers throw at him.
Clothing is all to "the azure. Women's dresses
are gettiig higher and thinner below and lower and
fewer above every year. It's going to be a hard
winter., Hard for the males.
A half pint of bathing suit is worth as much as'
two pieces of coal or an egg nowadays. Eve would
be green with envy at a modern bathing outfit.
She'd have to turn over a new leaf to ge#along to-
day., Adam's last name would be Upp from figur-
ing out the bills that drifted' int6 the garden every
day.
The bankers had a convention the other day.
They are going to do away with the hole in. the
doughnut to conserve material. Malt, hops, and
yeast have taken the elevator. Nothing outside of
Ypsilanti is Normal.
Men's vests are going to be sleeveless next year.

714 Monroe St.

NICE HOME COOKED MEALS
3 Meals pr. day $6.50 pr.wk.

-1

lude Front
Under Student Management

On the Huron River
"Ma" Failings

SAUNDERS' CAOE

aUSED TEXT BOOK..
IF NOT, BRING THEM IN
W EPAY CAS H
FOR ANY SECOND-HAND TEXT

(Next to Cutting)

UNIVERS.
WH BOOKSTC
Everything in University SuppI
FOR TRAVELING ANYWHERE, ANY TIN
Yl ;Wi1l* Enjoy Using the
A.B.A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank.
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50, and $100,
cashed by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without id
tion.
FARMERS AND MECHANICS B
101-.0, South Ma i Street 330 South stai

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Corner State

and Packard

t

THEANNARBOR PR

218 S. MAIN ST.
Confectioney
Lunches

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X

Our Printing Is
'Like Our

IWhen downtwn stopi
is avd cool off."

Phone

w

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r Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-,
er, whether the accoont be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, $4,750,000.00

/

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1

7

Press Building
Maynard St.

{-.

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Northwest Corner Main & Huron
707 North Universiy Avenue

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;6000 IIN6 TO A [TT AT

Del icatssen
IN SUNDAYS 4 TO 6 P. N.
119 [astL.iberty Street
Phone 2G20M

Official Printers to Tie
University of Michigan
and its Student Pubhic
cations

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.,
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THE ANN ARBOR P

SWAIN'.
713 E. University Avenue
develops films-
and
MAKES PRINTS

-

A'ow.

.K

I~ 11~
-$

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with

care

ST ENTS LUNCH
409 E. JEFFERSON
OPEN 6 A.M. to 10:30 P.M.
Home aked Pies
ALWAYS LADIES
READY INVITED
Before you Leave'
Remember/ your fri-
ends with flowers.
Especially your Foster
Parents.,
Special Good By boxes
$1.50 and up.
BluMaize Blossom Shop
Nickels Arcade

f,

Daily Service
Big Steamer
,Put-In-fBaY
Capacity 3270 Passengerso
Finest exclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest 0
Ball Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra
charge for dancing.\
Every day from Detroit at 9.00 a. m. for'
Put4n.-Ba-Connecting with Cleveland and
Buffalo Transit Co, and Steamer Arrow for
Middle Bass. Kelley's Island &I Lakeside.
Sandusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines, Fare, $1.50
CedarPoint-l5min.byferryfrom Sandusky, Faroincludingferry,1.75
Excursion fares.(returning same day
Put4n-Bay, week day 90c; Sundays Holidays, $1.25 Round trip.
Sandusky, evey day ,.©0 Round trip.
Four hoursat Put- -Bay; Bathing, visit the Caves, Perry's Monument,
Pavilion, Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several Hotels.
Cedar Point Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels, BoardWalk,
Thousands bathe here daly
Returning Leave Sandusy2.30 p. m.,Put-in-Bay 4.30 p. n., Leaveg"edar
Point ferry; connect at Sandusky. every ay arrive Detroit 8.00 p. m.
Dancing Moonlights,. Leave Ashley & Dust~in Steamer Line
Detroit 45 p.m. Fare Wed.
Thur. c Sat, $un 7-cFootof Fiast St. Detroit,Mich-.
-Writs for naop folds;-

'~u~j1j3~~j Liui~wnr
*

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zy in a Detroit restaurant
aspberries and got more

FOR RENT
SAUNDERs' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Auron River

I,

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