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August 11, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-08-11

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HE

OLVERINE

olverine

U E
I"DO YOU NEED YOUR

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER
N Or THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
d Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday Afternoons.
Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
OVFICE HlOJRS:
12 :oo Daily; .:30 to 5 :oo Daily, except Saturday.
*tions not to exceed 300 words, if sgned, the signatures
ily to be published in print, but as an evidence of
otices of events will be published in The Wolverine
tion of the Editor, if left or mailed to the office.
communicationa will receive no consideration. No
01l be returned inless the writer encloses postage.
erine does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
e communications.
' W. SARGENT, Jr................Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 120.
. HILILERY.....................Business Manager
Phone 96o or 2738. v"
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS
Chapman John J. Hamel, Jr. Robert S. Kersey
1TSUE EDITORS

H. Riley

Hamilton Cochran

COLUMN EDITOR
Howard Weeks
E13NESDAY, AUGUST 11, .1920.
RIES FOR MEN AT MICHIGAN
:o serve best the interests of her men
University of Michigan should build
for men as soon as possible. There has
:ontroversy of late years over this very
estion, and every time the matter has
tup~ by t1ie Urivergity authorities somre-
ied so forcibly against it that the ques-
:n dropped. With the increased num-
ents enrolling ir the University every
ear that some decision must be made in

f

iancial and intellectual interests are the most
factors in the life of the male student, and
would be served best by the University if
itories for men were erected. The establish-
of women's dormitories here has proved that
ants can live cheaper when housed in, largeF
ers, rather than divided up in rooming houses.
ladies are knowx to charge outrageous prices
oor rooms, especially just before college opens,
students are in immediate Reed of a place
.y. With dormitories, the men of the Univer-
would have far better rooms than they could
to get from local landladies at any price.
s dormitories always include a dining room or
mons." Here Michigan men would eat to-
r aid have better food at a cheaped rate than
Ann Arbor eating house could hope to offor.
he whole,. Michigan men in dormitories would
a more comfortable existence than they ever,
vhile in school before,-at a lower price than
erly.
it not one of the main responsibilities of the
ersity to look after the intellectual interests of
tudents ? If Michigan were, to erect dormitor-
)r men, 4he University authorities would soon
:hat the scholastic standing of the school was
I to a considerable degree. Freshmen and
)mrnres especially, would lhe compelled to spend
al hours each night in study. The samehouse'
that now, apply to the women's dormitories
bly would be enforced in the men's build-
In this way the students would get into the
of real study and tike their University career
seriously. Men of the same class in the Uni-
y would be housed in the same building. Thus
tdents who were taking the same courses
- have opportunity to get together in the eve-
and help each other with their work.
hat of the Michigan spirit? It is a well un-
>od fact that large universities lick spirit be-
of the absence of co-operation and co-ordin-
Dormitories at Michigan would eradicate
ndifferent attitude on the part of .many stu-
which was maitfest last year in athletics.
freshman entered a dormitory he would soon
ne familiar with the traditions and ideal's olf
chool. At present, the life of the average man
nt here is a thing apart fror the University..
ersity authorities would have a better chance
derstaxd and aid new students than before, if
itories were erected for they would be in con-
touch with them through the house heads.
the last few years, almost every progressive
rsity in the couintry has been planning to build
itories for men. Surely Michigan is consider-
be a progressive school, and a leader in every-
that is best. Why then should not Michigan
lish dormitories for her men students?

Editorial Comment
BAITING THE SOVIET TRAP
No one should work more than two hours a day.
Every workman should own an automobile. Capi-
tal should supply the chauffeurs Each workman
should have a summer vacation of at least two
months at some seaside resort.
Those are highlights in ;he propaganda expound-
ed by one John Alexander, or Alexander Jaunuiks-
na, a leader in the world soviet movement, now in
custody for draft evasion and other things. He re-
cites the creed glibly as an appeal to American
workers to join his cause. They are interesting
chiefly in contrast to the practical d'evelopment of
the soviet regime. He makes promises. Extracts
from Russian soviet records, therefore, are enter-
taining as showing how seriously Alexander may 'e
taken by those to whom he appeals.
Trotsky's report at the ninth congress of the
Russian Communist party, as published in the Mos-
cow Izvestia, March 21, 1920, says: "Under a uni-
fied system of economy the masses of workien
should be moved about, ordered and sent from
place to place in exactly the same manner as sol-
diers. Without this we are unable to speak seri-
ously of any organization of, industry on a new
basis in the conditions of starvation and disorgan-
ization existing today.
The Krasvaya Gazeta.(Red Gazette) of April 18,
1920, reveals the fact that failure to accept this
compulsory labor ,is punished by imprisonment.
Desertion from the labor army is punished as de-
sertion in war. In support of this soviet policy,
Karl Radek, former bolshevist envoy to Germany,
in the Moscow Pravada of April 4, 1920, said:
"It (the Communist party) will put the working
masses on their feet to perform this heroic work,
just as it led them to heroism in war."
The central executive committee of the Com-
munist-party in March made the following declara-
tion of principle: .
"The soviet regime is confronted by the task of
raising the intensity of labor on the basis of social
economy and in the interests of the toiling masses.
There is nothing in these statements about limit-
ing labor to two hours a day and providing laborers
with automobiles. They reveal only that practical
communish works out, to increase the intensity of
labor, to eliminate fredom of choice of labor, to
eliminate the right to strike, to punish strikers by
imprisonment, etc.
. Alexander's job is to get the workingmen into th'
soviet fold. The soviet's job is to use hin after
he gets in. If, in view of the facts, ay working-
ainan succumbs to the Russian Commnistis appeal
he certainly will deserve little better than what he
.will get. That will be plenty.-The Chicago Tri-
bune.
DELUDED ORATORS
All these apostles of discontent who tell us that
America condemns bolshevism because it does not
know the truth about it are themselves the victims
of delusion if they really believe what they say on
the subject.
The testimony of careful observers, such as Dr.
S. G. Youngert of the United states commission to
Europe, who spoke on this subject yesterday in Ke-
wanee, is reliable and fully informing. It is based
upon a careful study at first hand of what the bol-
shevists are doing and trying to do. Dr. Youngert
properly calls bolshevism the world's new foe. Men
and women, enjoying the liberties and happiness of
America, shudder at the evils that the Russian plan
embodies.. They want none of it here nor elsewhere
on the earth, if they can prevent it, for it is a con-
tamination to all the world's peace.
Anybody advocating such monstrosities of gov-
ernment and social life as those extrolled in- the
Russian theory is out of tune with the American
thought and conscience.-K ewanee Star-Courier.
Abaft the News

On the Exorbita-nt Expense of Existing
Thei-e is one thing we're sure of nowadays, any-
way, besides death. That is that the soaring cost
of living is nose-diving higher and higher every
day.
A gentleman in the most elite circles of the foot-
wear trade made the remark the other day that
the. shoe manufacturers were soon going back to
making shoes out of leather because the price of
paper was so high.
Even in sports, or for sports, it is pretty easy to
see. They've shoved up the price of grandstand seats
at the Windsor track so that it costs you half a
fish more to lose your heard earned buttons than it
used to. Steps should be taken.
Even people lose more this year according to me.
- You bet American money and even if you win
you surround a lot of strange Dominion currency
which boils itself down to a few yen when
translated into green-backs. All the Jesse -James
are at tke track and their horses are running. Run-
ning away with your gold.
I know a bricklayer well that told me just the oth-
er day that he simply couldn't afford cord tires on
both cars. Things are at a pretty pass as the crap
shooter observed,

fOi RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY
On the Huron River

11

"Ma" Failings I II

714 Monroe Si.

(Next to crutting)

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE
Everything in Unversity Supplies

11

NICE HOME COOKED MEALS

3 Mealy rpie.

day $6.59 Vrwk.

I

Blue Front
igar Store
Under Student Management

FOR TRAVELING ANYWHERE, ANY TIME
You 1Will Enjoy -using the
A.B.A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50, and $100, and are
cashed by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identifica-
tion.
- ASK US --
FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK
101.105 South Main Street 330 South State Street
(Nickels Arcade)

I ,,

USED TEXT BOOKS?

I

a

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Corner State

and Packard

TRUBEY'S
218 S. MAIN ST. am

I

T!HEANN ARBOR PRESS

I,

t: '.

Confeclionery
Lunches

Our Printing Is
Like Our

I

When downtown stop
In and cool off.
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank.
Incorporated 1869
Vapital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, $4,750,000.00,
Northwest Corner Main & Huron
707 North Universiy Avenue

F NOT, BRING THEM IN

Phone,

WE PAY CASH
FOR ANY SECOND-HAND TEXT

I

I

NO.'

1

Preys Building
Maynard St,

U,

.1

I

I

lI

GOOD THINGS TO EAT AT
Beckers

Delicatessen
OPEN SUNDAYS 4 TO 6 P. M.
119 EastLiberty Street
Phone 2620M

Official Printers to The
University of Michigan
and its Student Public-
cations

I

!
y

U;

THE ANNA __PRESS

I

I

713 E. University Avenue
develops films
and
MAKES PRINTS
with care
STUDENTS-LUNCH'
409 E. jEFFERSON
OPEN 6A.M. to 10:30 P.M1
Home eaked Pies
ALWAYS LADIES
READY INVItED
Before you Leave
Remember your fri-
ends with flowers.
Especially your Foster
Parents.
Special Good By boxes
$1.50 and up.
BluMaize Blossom Shop
Nickels Arcade

I

BA

& AM
pfv- -M-o-
flaily Service

Big Steanier.
Pu t-In-Bay
Capacity 3270 Passengers
Finest exclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest
Ball Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra 0
charge for dancing.
Every day from Detroit at 9.00 a. m. for
Put-InBay -Connecting with Cleveland and.
Buffalo Transit Co., and Steamer Arrow for
Middle Bass, Kelley's Island &i Lakeside.
Sa dusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban LinesFare, $1.50
Cedar Point-15min. byferry fromSandusky,Fare includingferry, 1.75
Excursion fares. (returning same day
PutIn-Bay, week day, 90c; Sundays. Holidays, $.25 Raunad trip.
Saansky.. ever day $2 00 Round trip. ,,
Four hours at Nt-in-Bay; Bathing,.visit the Caves, Perry's Monument,
Pavilion, Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several Hotels.
Cedar Paint-Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels, Board Walk,
Thousands bathe here dai *. '
Returning Leave Sandusky 2.30 p. m. Ntin-Bay 4.30 p. in., Leave Cedar
Point ferry; connect at Sandusky, every clay. arrive Detroit 8.00 P. iM.
Dancing Moonlights. Leave Ashley & Dustin Steamer Line
Detroit 8.45 P. m. Fare Wed. i
& Thur. 6oc Sat, &rSun. 75c. Foot of First St. Detroit, Mich.
Write for ,ap folder
E _lli

I

, INCLUDE YOUR NAMES

Owing to the dangerous effects that might result
>m printing communicatiows from unknown part-
, no communications will be published by this
per unless the party's name, telephone number,
d address are included. If the individual does
t wish 4s name to appear, The Wolverine gill
por his request, but the editor must know the
rson'writing. This policy is formulated because
our desire to know exactly the source of all our
ormation and to know if the'article submittedo
n be relied upon.
If this were not carried out, publication of un-
ie or paitial facts might involve The Wolverine
difficulties. For this reason we ask alayone sub-
tting communications to, include his name, tele-
one number, and address.

i 9

Al-

I

j . .

I

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River

' ,
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s- =
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