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August 10, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-08-10

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IN,

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tIne

vT NEWS.PAPER O" THE SUMMER
HE UNIVERSITY Or MICHIGAN.
y, Thursday, and Saturday Afternoons.
rbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.

.

IDyFIC, pyHOURS:
1:30 to 5:oo Daily, except Saturday!.

nat to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signatures
be published in print, but as an evidence of
of evFts will be published in The Wolverine
1the Eiditor, if left or mailed to the office.
unications will receive no consideration. No,
returned unless the writer encloses postage,
foes not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
munications,
SARGENT, Jr................Managing Editor
P'hone 2414 or 120.
,IERY..................Business Manager
'Phone 96o or 2738.

BUSINESS ASSISTANTS
n John J. Hamel, Jri.

Robert S. Kersey

ISSUE EDITORS
Hamilton Cochran

COLUMN EDITOR
Howard Weeks

AUGUST 10,

1920.

LIEVE THE ATHLETES?
Metes, thermselves, have prepared
ency against the United States
e, some of the incredulous folk
elieve our early contentions of
icompetency. The serious and
tat these charges will have can
If the athletes follow up their
better living conditions are giv*
lot stop until a repetition of these
'4 is impossible. Through the ath-
e has been partially opened, and
. charges are'given to the news
>ssible for every citizen, interest-
o know the exact extent of the
lency. With most of the men
ersity and business men, it can
hat there is just ground for their
very sportsman in this. cou'ntry
in knowing t® what extent the
its duties.
before how the committee failed
he tryouts and the selection of
eglect, which it has shown in the
he men, is almost unbelievable,
ie main are true. That the ath-
)est work after crossing the At-
r and cramped quarters and liv-
ri Antwerp, is improbable, and if
does not measure up to expecta-
n be easily traced-to the United

THE PROFESSOR AND RESEARCHI
Percy Mac Kaye's acceptance of a pr fessorship
at Miami university, which asks .::n in return for a
home and&his salary-only to continue his work as a
dramatist, marks a novel step in American educa-
tion. In the history of universities, there are many
instances of men doing research work and teaching
a few hours of classes, but it is said to be a new
thing to retain a professor, whose only duty.is to
undertake research. It is a step toward progress,
but in reality it' is nothing new at all. In the Mid-
dle Ages the monks, who were the educators of their
times, devoted most of. their hours to study, and
only a few of them taught anything directly. Since
then that practice has generally been discontinued,.
but occsionally some rich individual has enabled
an eminent professor to carrytontresearch work;
with ,nothing to distract him. Often in large un-
versities, the most prominent men are required to
teach only one class a day and to devote the rest of
their time to research and study. Others have held
positions, which have permitted them to do much
outside work, but Mr. Mac Kaye's appointment as
a professor with no specific duties, is most unique.
At last the universities are recognizing the value of
research and study, which should be two of a col
lege's greatest aims. In this way educktion can be
greatly advanced, and if more schools followed the
steps of Miami, educational advance will be rapid.
Greater overhead expense in Ann Arbor than in
the little city of Detroit is probably the reason milk,
tea, and coffee costs ten cents here -and five cents
in the Wayne county metropolis.
Michigan will have more men out for early foot-
hall training this year than they had candid tes fbr
the whole team last fall.
It's a noble man that can bear no grduge against
"Babe" Ruth when he doesn't get a home run dur-
ing the game..." ;
Editorial Comment
GROWTH OF TAXATION
Just as the current advance in prices took some
time to spread from the points in the industrial or-
ganization where it first became acute to other rela-
tionships so it is proving true of ,taxation. During
the war the need for increased revenue was first,
felt by the federal government. This necessity was
quickly passed on to the several states in connec-
tion with their war outlays. Then as prices ad-
vanced and the cost of getting work done was in-
creased thre was an additional reason for new
taxation. Finally the cities have had to raise the
pay of teachers and other employes, have had to
expend more for their actual day to day necessities
as labor has advanced in price, and now practically
all over the country are largely adding to their tax
burdens.
bThisincrease of taxation is of great importance
- because a reduction in public exactions is always
difficult to bring about. Even if there should be a
/ sharp cut in prices it would take a much longer tie
to reduce taxation ccr'espondingly than it did orig-
inally to, increase it. ,1 grades of government when
accustomed to receive inc me of given size are loath
to reduce or relinquish it and when savings have
been made possible through reduction of prices
much prefer to spend the funds in some new way
rather than to cut taxation.
The drift thatis at present going on, therefore, in
municipalties throughout the counry must be re-
garded as tending to establish an approximately
permanent condition, whose effects will be long in
erasing themselves.
It should be remembered in all munidipal financ-
ing at the present time that every step toward the
enlargement of taxation must be regarded as a last-
ing burden upon property values, and that its effects
will be seen in a continuous and semi-permanent
increase in rentals, which' means in the cost of doing
business-Journal of Commerce.

JAG AND JAZZ
It has been freely prophesied that prohibition will
have a beneficial effect upon the theater, eventually
creating a demand for better kinds of stage enter-
tainment than those concocted for alcoholic patrons.
Some tangible evidence that this really may be the
case is found in a statement just issued by Flo Zieg-
feld in regard to his new "Follies.",
"It is a new kind of 'Follies'," says the famous
iroducer. "I have staged this year's edition as a
well-knit fabric, not merely a series of scenes. To
borrow a term from the silent drama, I have in-
corporated 'continuity.' With the advent of prohibi-
tion the theatergoer is in his seat whe nthe cutrain
goes up. There are few late comers now. More-
over, the folks out front are cold sober. They look
at the stage with steadfast intelligence; there is no
haze of cocktails to blur their vision and judgment.
They are there to be entertained, demanding merit.
The theatergoing public of 1920 and hereafter will
ask for entertainment of solid merit."
That sounds well, anyway. And, whatever MF_
Ziegfeld's entertainment may prove to us, we be-
lieve that his reasoning is sound. The brainless
messes of jazz which have so frequently been served
up to us in the past, conld only, as we have always
felt, appeal to jagged patrons. There is a connec-
tion stronger than alliteration between fag and jazz.
If the producers have comg to a realization 'of the
fact, we can look forward to the theaterical future
with a stronger hope than ever before. Mr. Zieg-
feld's statementis simply another proof of the unal-
terable principle that any betterement of the theater
must begin with the audience.-Ohio State Journal.,

On the Huron River

"Ma Failings

, I

WE PAY CASH
FOR ANY SECOND-HAND TEXT
UNIVER
BOOKST(

DO YOU N

' ''

? 4 Monroe St'

(N~ext to Cutting)

NICE HOME COOKED MEALS
3 Meals pr. day $6.50 pr.wk.
Blue Front
igar Store
Under Student Management

Everything in University Supplies

r

FOR TRAVELING ANYWHERE, ANY TIME
You 'Wil Enjoy 'Using the
A.B.A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. TI
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50, and $100, anda
cashed by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identifi
tion.
-ASKJUS
FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK
101405 South Man Street 330 South State Sti
% (Nickels Arcade)

EE'

USED '11EX'1'

M

I

EOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY

I

I

(F NOT, BRING THEM IN

Corner State and Packard
'RUBEY"'
218 S. MAIN ST.
Confectionery
Lunches
When downtown stop
in and cool off.
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
ei', whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bnk
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, $4,750,000.00
Northwest Corner Main & Huron
707 North Universiy Avenue
GOO 600THINMS. TD[AT AT ii

a

I

T'HE ANN ARBOR PT

.

Our Printing Is
Like Our

Phone

I

No.

1

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I

Press Building
Maynard St.

i

s it will be necessary for the American
all down miserably before the people will
' change in administration for the 1924
it we hope not. If the press and the Uni-
do what is to be expected of them, they
> it that competent men 're placed on the
e. Again we urge the universities,'whose
the points and whose graduates give the
> begin an active campaign for a better
committee in 1924. The charges by the
vill greatl1y help thein in this matter.
ATED SQUARELY-AT THE UNION
t the local restaurants making their book:j
is almost itnpossible to prove any charges
ering against them, but there must be a
elief among the students, that there is
wrong. The recent raises can hardly
'd; at least our investigation into the mat-
us believe that the restaurants are mak-
ifair profit. As ,we say, nothing can' be
iless their books are made public, but be-
recent popular cry against profiteers, we
I vague rumors of the eating house pro-
elling of their exceptional profits. \All of
gs, the rumors, the increased prices, the
us and slow service, make the students
e restaurants and make them believe that
omething wrong. We know of a great
o have refused to patronize the restaur-
use of these conditions, and if more peo-
ae same steps ,the proprietors would have
town and meet their patrons.
-se the students have to eat some place,'
iber of them will undoubtedly have to con-
ig at the restaurants. However, there is
the city, which can be trusted and which
:s best to meet the student trade. If this
e given a greater patronage, the restaur-
d be forced to lower prices, to get any
t all.
Union is a student clubhouse. It is an
>n of the students, by the students, and
:udents. No attempt is made to profit
1, as it is their organization. For every
t. the students pay for their goods, they
in return. He<e the students can buy
[, and know that they are getting the
at the lowest possible price. It is an
that can be trusted. If its managers
be trusted, they could be quickly remov-
students themselves, but the managers
ys remained. At the Union .the Michigan
eat reasonably and know that they ai-e
square deal. Every meal that they buy
in curbing the porfiteer and in helping
:udents, who must eat elsewhere, to get

Decker's

OfficialPrinters to The
University of Michigan
and its Student Publif-
cations

Delicatessen
OPEN SUNDAYS 4 TO 6 P. M,
119 [astLiberty Street
PI'one 2620M,

s

THANARBOR pRES

I

SWAIN"'
713 E. University Avenue,
develops films
and
MAKES PRINTS
wit care

i

V

" -

Dr
Daily Service

STUDENTS LUNCH
409 E. JEFFERSON
OPEN 6sA.M. to 10:30 P.M,
Home aked Pies,
ALWAYS LADIES
READY INVITED
Before you Leave
Remember your fri-
ends with flowers.
Especi1l1y your Foster
Parents.
Special Good By boxes
$1.50 and up.
BluMaize Blossom Shop
Nickels Arcade

Big Steamer
tInay
Capacity 3270 Passengers
Fihestexclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest 0
Ball Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra
charge for dancing.
Every day from Detroit at 9.00 a. m. for
Put-In-Bay-Connecting. -with Cleveland and
Bu'alo Transit Go., and Steamer Arrow for
id dle Bass, Ktey'a Isand & Lakeside.
Sandusky-Connecting withiRailroads and Suburban Lines, Fare,$1.50 -
Cedar Point-15 min. byferryfromSandusky, Fare includingferry, 1.75
,..Excursion fares, (returning same day
Put-in.Bay, week day,90c; Sundays, Holidays, $1.25 Round trip.
Sandusky. evey day, $2.00 Roun trip.
Four hours at Put-n-Bay; Bathingv isit the Caves, Perry's Monument.
Pavilion. Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several'Hotels.
Cedar Point-Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels, BoardWalk,
Thousands bathe he dail.y.
Returning Leave Sandusky 2.30 P. m. Put-in-Bay 4.30 p. m., Leave Cedar
Poist ferry; connect at Sandusky. every dlay arrive Detroit 8.00 p. at

't

I

Danclqg Moonlights. LAVO
Detroit 845p.m Fare Wed.
&8Thur. 60c Sat.&?Sun. 71"c.
Write for map folder

Ashley & Dustin Steamer Liae
Foot of First St. Detroit, Mich.

1

I:

-. 9f

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River

'""-^ - ;1
+ ;.. -
_=-4;,
®
" e ti - .
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