100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 10, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-08-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

*nftrrhwt~

AT YOUR
THREE T]

A WEEK

,,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 10, 1920.

PRICE F

t ,..

WHAT'S GOING ON
Ir

i

rELVIRINE COMES OUT
FOUR TIMES THIS WEEK

August 10
5 p. m.-Recent Britiph Policies in In-
dia. Prof. A. L. Cross.
8 p. m.-Medical' Lecture. Dr. J. G.
Van Zwaluwenburg.
August 11
5 p. m.-Some Problems of American-
ization as Seen by an Army Psychol-
ogist, Prof. C. S Berry.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versit, Sc'.ool of Music. (Hill Audi-
torium.)

l

i,
4

1111~l

Four issues of The Wolverine
will be published this week on
Tuesday, Wednesady, Thursday,
and Saturday afternOons. There
will be only one paper the next
week, which will come out on
Tuesday.
This action is being taken in
order that ?members of the edi-
torial and business .staffs of The
Wolverine may have sufficient
time to prepare for their exam-
inations and also to allow' the
publication of the usual 25
papers.

TION
L YEAR

7
8

August 12
p. m.- Income Tax Procedure. Prof.
W. A. Paton.
p. m.-Educational motion pictures.'
p. m.-The Element of Beauty from
the Public Standpoint, Miss Emma
Gratton, room 205, Engineering
building. Art exhibition of students
in public art work follows from 9 to
10 o'clock.

Summer
d from
Ilavis,
Biolog7

work the ex-
the progress
and the gen-
ps.
has had the
since its or-
he reports.
found to be
is made up
the Univer-
ode's persons
Illinois, Yale
f Iowa, and
tural collego.
Wed

.5
-
p

August 13
p. m.-The Present Industrial Situ-
ation, Prof. David Friday.
p. m.-Spanish Gypsy Folk Songs
(Illustrated with Victrola), PIrof.
C. P. Wagner.

'I

August 16
5 p. m.--Subject and lecturer to be an-
nounced.
8 p. m.-Spanish Gypsy Folk Songs
(illustrated with the Victrola) Prof.
C. P. Wagner.
August 17
8 p. m.-Recital. The Class in Shake--
spearean Reading. (University Hall.)
QUESTION OF BRITAiN IN
INWC CROSS -SBJCT

'm all
o for-
chers
~pepial1
s,. and
repre-

MEDICAL LECTURE
EIGHT O'CLOCK
EYENING

COME S
TO Is

AT

at

the Prof. A. L. Cross of the history de-
ists partment, will give a lecture, "Recent
hus British Policies in India," at 5 o'clock
this afternoon. Tonight at 8 o'clock
the regular weekly medical lecturej
the Nwill be given as usual. It will be de-
livered by Dr. J. G. Van Zwaluwen-
the burg and will be "X-Ray and Modern
ers, Medical Methods."
the Berry Speaiks Tomorrow
Tomorrow afternoon Prof. C. S.1
ized Berry wil speak on "Some Problems
the of Americanization as Seen by anI
een' Army Psychologist." The regular'
as weekly concert of, the faculty of the
use School of Music will be given as' u5ual
p(- Wednesday evening in Hill auditor-

Education Club's
Farewell fleeting
,Setlor Tao.rrow
The Men's Educational ?club will
have its last meeting of the year Wed-
nesday evening at Ferry field.
There will be a baseball gam at
this time between the faculty and the
superintendents of schools. An um-
pire has not as yet been secured and
the teams are looking for an official.
The qualifications, according to a
member of the educational faculty,
are that the man must know the game
thoroughly, must be of absolute in-
tegrity, and must give decisions fav-
orable to the faculty, no matter which
way the play goes.
The job was offered to President
Burton but as he left the city, he had
to decline. Some one suggested that
this offer caused him to -depart soon-.
er than expected.
, Johnson to Speak
Following the game the players and
others will partake of food in the
form of southern watermelons. Aft-
er all have satisfied themselves T. K.
Johnson, state superintendent of
public education, will tell of recom-
mendations that he will make t the
state legislature, when it assembles.
These recommendations will give the
legislature some idea as to the laws it
must pass during the coming session
about educational matters.
With this get-to-gether the Educa.
tional club will have finished a suc-
cessful season, accrding to the mem-
hers. The Men's Educational club was
organized at the beginning of the
Summer session, drawing its members
from the faculty of the educational
department and teachers, who were
taking work in the Summer session.
There are about 75 members, 33 of
whom are superintendents of schools.
The executive department of the club
departed from the usual custom by
having three presid'nts. These are:
L. W. Faust, superintendent of schools
at Mt Clemens; Harvey Lowry of the
Central State No rmal school at Mt.
Pleasant, and Prof. George E. Myers,
of the department of education.
SMet in Union'
The club has held meetings every
Wednesday evening, usually at the
Union. These meetings have been In
the form of a dinner, after which
there were one or two addressesa on
educational matters. In addition the.
club held a picinic. The organiation
has attempted to be of benefit to its
members and at the same time give
an opportunity for a little diversion,
so that at al meetings there has been
a spirit of levity, which has kept up
the life of the club.
Speakers that have appeared be-
fore the organization, besides its own
embers, are: Floyd Rowe, of the
state department of physical educa-
tion; President Marion L. Burton;
President Coffman, of Minnesota, and
Dean E. H. Kraus, of the Sumer ses-
sion. The latter three were accorded
honor3ry membership in the club.
"Y" SECRETARY WILL RETURN
SOON ,FROM HIS VACATION
T. S. Evans, who has been spending
his vacation with his family in Ocean
City, N. J., will return the latter part
of this month to continue his duties as
secretary of the University "Y", Lane
hall: -
GEORGE HURLEY R ETURNS
FROM WEEK PINE LAKE TRIP

1Y 1CAINETPLANS
EXTENSION Of ITS
CAMPIUSACTIITIES
PROGRESSIVE STEPS PLANNED
TO PUT ASSOCIATION ON
HIGH LEVEL
WILL.CANVASS ENTIRE
CITY FOR POSITIONS
Will Improve Union Services; Other
Steps Being Considered by Body
of Prominent Men
Several meetings of the University
Y. M.-C. A. cabinet during the summer{
months have resulted in its decision
to extend greatly the association's ac-
tiviti s on the Michigan campus next3
yea. Progressive steps are planned,
which wil place the Y. M. C. A. on
a higher footing thain ever before.-
Issue Handbook
The greatest universal move is the1
edition on a better scale of the Fresh-
man bible.' 'Another act the a so-
ciation will be a thorough canvass oft
Ann Arbor which will result in listing'
all jobs for' student applicants. Dur-l
ing the past year thsi was one of thec
biggest phases of Y. M. C. A. activity,t
positions which brought in more thant
$90,000 being secured.
The Union services, which were or-1
iginated last year, will be inproved
upon, and efforts made to make-them
of more general interest. An excep-
tionally large audience was usually
present in the spring, but C. Stewart
Baxter '21, president of the Students'
Christian Association, expects better
results this year.
Formulate Plans
Other plans are being formulated
by the cabinet, which will bring the
"Y" work to the frot. On t1Ne cab-
inet are some of the most prominent
men on the- campus: Chesser .M.
Campbell, '21, news editor of The
Daily; Richard Losch, '21E, Varsity
track, Donald Porter, '21, recording
secretary of the Union; Le Grand A.
Gaines, '21E, business manager of The
Daily and president of the Student
Council; Alan King, '21, business
manager of the Students' Directory,
and Roswell Dillon, '21E, Student
councilman and chairman of the J-
Hop.
KRAUS WILL CONFER WITH
PRARMIC GRADS WEDNESDAY
Prof. E. H. Kraus, dean of the Suni-
mer sessin and,acting dean of the
College of Pharmacy, will go to De-
troit Wednesday evening to meet with
the alumnni of the College of Pharm-
acy. -
Professor Kraus assumed the posi-
tion of acting dean- of the Colloge of
Pharmacy upon the resignatiqn of
Prof. E. H. Kreamer at the beginning
of the Summer session.
PARTELLF-. ATHLETIC DIRECTOR,
GOES ON SUJMMER VACATION
P. B. Bartelme, director of the Ath-
letic association, left yesterday with
his family for his summer vaation
which he will spend at Torch Lake in
northern Michigan. He expects to be
gone about a month, returning short,
ly before fall football-training begins.
Harry Tillottson will be in charge
of the athletic office during his ab-
scence.

NUMBER OF OFFICIALS MUCH
REDUCED; SEC. SMITH LEAVES1
Sec. Shirley W. Smith has left his
duties to take a vacation to be gone
a- pouple of weeks. With his depart-
ure the officials of the University,
who are in the city,,are very reduced
in numbers as President Marion L.
Burton, Registrar Arthur G. Hall, and
Dean Effinger are already taking their
vacation, g
LECTURE ON BEAUTY WILL BE
GIVEN IN ENGINEERING BLDG.
The lecture on "The Element of
Beauty from the Public Standpoint,"
which Miss Emma Grattan will deliv-
er Thursday evening at 8 o'clock will
be given in room 205 of the Engineer-
ing building instead of in the Natural
Science auditorium. There will be an
exhibit of art following the lecture
which will consist of work -done by
students in the course of Public
School art.

SELECTIONS FROM
TENNYSON READ
Despite the heavy rain, a large
number of persons attended the read-
ings of selections from the works, of
the English poet, Lord Alfred Ten-
nyson, given by the members of Prof.
R. D. T. Hollister's class in inter-
pretive reading, last evening in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. .
"The idea of the oral readings,"
said Professor Hollister. "is to try
to interpret to the greatest extent pos-
sible, the lyrics,. and poems of the
poet. Each poem is an experience of
life, lived through by Tennyson."
In giving the readings the members
f the class were somewhat handi-
capped by the noise of the thunder
and rain. The interpretations, how-
ever, wer given with ease and feel-
ing and showed the result of careful
and thorough work.
Miss Parker read: "Sweet and
Low," and "Break, Break, Break;"
Miss R. C. Hunter, "Swallow Song,"
and "Far, Far Awey;" Miss Waits,
"Turn Fortune," and "Marianna;"
Miss Norris, "Tears, Idle Tears," and
"Ulyses;" ; Miss Stowe, "Lotus Eat-
ers," and "Bugle Song;" Miss Steph-
ens, "Late, Late, So Late," and
"Dora;" Miss Beeman,' "As Through
the ]Land at Eve We Went," "The
Threstle," and "The Lady of Shallot;"
Miss Rice, "Ask Me No More," "Charge
of the Light Brigade," and "Crossing
the Bar," Mr. Rosecrance, "The
Charge of the Heavy Brigade," "ack
Tar," and .'Rain, Rain, and Sun;,
Miss Leonard, - "Milk Maid Song,"
"Song of Elaine," and "Revenge."'
LAST GAMES OF MEET TO
BE PLAYEDTHIS REK
SANCHEZ AND BEDDOW TO EN-
GAGE IN TELNIS
FINALS

P&RTTIMIECHOD1
SYSTEM PRAI-SE
BYPROF. lE
SAYS TECHNICAL EFFICII
AND INDUSTRIAL IDEALS
ARE RESITLTS
SCHOOL AND INDUSTI
ARE NOW CONNECT
Pl'ans Made to Have School
and Emloyment Carried on
at Same Time

Increased technical efficiency
sound economic and industrial id
are two of the important result
the part time &chool connecting
educational system with industry,
cording to the statement of G
Myers, professor of industrial ed
tion, in his lecture on the part 1
school system yesterday afternoo
"A sharp line has been drawi
the past between the school and
dustry," declared , Professor My
"An individual was on one side
the other. The number who wor
in school was relatively very sng
and there was no connection bety
their school work and employn-
The latter was pursued merely a
means of' securing funds for cont
ing school work.
"Most people cross this line
tween education and employmen
soon as the compulsory edue
laws permit. Two-thirds of those
enter the primary grades leave
after they are above the compul
age limit, and but one-tenth of
total number entering school ever
ish their high school work. Du
recent years there has been an e
to postpone the rate at which p1
cross this line, and some success
been attained. In 1918 there N
seven times as many' high school
dents in the country as there wer
1898. As a result our colleges
universities are flooded with
dents."
Educators Not Satisfied
E lucators have not been sati
with this partial result,, Profe

The last games of the Summer ses-
sion tennis tournament will be played
this week. In the singles Sanchez
won the right to appear in the finals
by winning from Merkel 6-0, 6-3, 6-0,]
and Beddow earned his place in the
final row by defeating White 6-2, 7-5.
The game between Beddow and San-
che z prbmises to be' a tight one and
it will be a hard race for the final
title, .both men having played about'
par in the previous contests..
Custer and Stull won from Ander-
son and White, 6-4, 6-4, and are wait-
ing for the Burley \and Stoddard vs.
Bowers and Sanchez match to be
played. Although Custer and Stull
seem quite, confident that the victory
1il1 come to them, they are warned1
by the Bowiers-Sanchez followers that
-the latter will make them work hard
for the honors should they be fortun-
ate to win their next match.

lum- ium.
Thursday afternoon Prof. W. A. Pa-
-'sta- ton will speak on "Income Tax Pro-
utlay cedure" and that evening there will
utray be educational motion pictures at 7
From o'clock and at 8 o'clock there will be
fived an informal lecture and art exhibit
wat Sin roo a 205o of the Engineering build1-
ing under the direction of Miss Emma
uar
Grattan.
r up- Week's Program End Friday,
'The program for the week will be
wound up Friday with a lecture in
perm- the afternoon on "The Present In-
xces- dustrial Situation" by - Prof. David
better Friday and one in the evening on
madee panish Gypsy Folk Songs by Prof.
C. P. Wagner of the Spanih depart-

it

ad-
0on

in

The story hour will be continued at
2. o'clock Wednesday and Thursday
under the direction of Mr. Ray K.
Immel in room 305, Mason hall.

rk it is

' provision
at least 100.
assured by
biology are
st spend at
work.
i Cheboygan
part of -the
wned by the
illes distant

RENNESEY BEATS WESBROOK
IN T'VRI-STATE TENNIS MEET
Walter Wesbrook, representing a
Cleveland club, was defeatel in the
finals of the tri-state tennis tourna-
rent at Fort Wayne, Ind., Sunday by
John Hennesey of Indianapolis. The
scores were 8-10, 6-3, 6-3. Hennesey,
paired with Fritz Bastian of Indian-
apolis aid the University of Indiana,
beat Wesbrook and Simmons of Cleve-
land in'the double in a five set match,
which ran 6-3, 6-4; 2-6. 5-7, 6-2.

OLIVE GRADS, STUDENTS, AND
FRIENDS TO. HAVE A PICNIC
All graduates, former students, and
friends of Olivet college who are in
Ann Arbor this summer are invited
to join in a picnic at the Island, Fri-
day, Aug. 13. The starting point will
be Helen Newberry Residence, at 5:30
o'clock in the afternoon. Further in-
formation can b4 obtained by calling
Miss Susanna Clough dr Miss Bertha
Steward, Newberry, 2676. ..
SU3DIER SESSION LIT GRADES
WILL BE MAILED TO STUDENTS
The grades of the students in the
college of Literature, Science, and the
Arts of the Summer session will be
mailed to them from the office of the
Registrar as soon as they are turned
in by the instructors.
,['his is contrary to the announce-
ment in the bulletin of the Summer
sesison, whcih says persons must
make arrangements for getting their
grades from the Registrar's office.
The latter announcement is an old
o'ne that had not -been corrected.
INFORMATION WANTED

Myers stated, and plans have
made by which schooI work an
ployment can be carried on a
same time, especially in voca
subjects. Outgrqwths of this pla
eve'ning schools, agricultural
sion work, college and universt
tension courses, and a co-ope
high school course, one-half o
time being devoted to school an
other half to work.
Recognizing 1 the benefits of
trial education, many corpor
are organizing systems to' traim
employees properly, Professor
said. The Goodyear Tire and
ber company of Akron, Ohio, ha
vided free courses which are
taken by 5,000 of7'their employee
this plant the school work is
any time from 7 a. m..to 11 p.
suit the convenience of the sW
"But the greatest effort," sa
speaker, "is for the compulsor
time school. Compulsory law
jiart time schools are now effee
20 states, 18 of which passed th
within the last two years: Wh
system becomes operative, C
will have 50,000 young people i
time schools and New York 10
Explains .State Law
Outlining the Michigan state
characteristic of the laws for
time compulsory schools, Pr(
Myers said that it provides fo'
schools in school districts of 5
more population. The part
school must be in session as
days during the year as the r
schcols and all children und
years of age not enrolled in th
ular school must attend the ne
The pupil must attend not les
eight hours a week.
Through the part time sche
pupil is.helped to interpret pi
ally in his work the proble
meets in his academic studies.
assisted to adjust himself to h
to business and industrial lit
the school aut'horities keep 'sn
ion over him until he\'ias t
suitable place of employment.
impressed with the fact that
tion does not necessarily end
employment begins. This wi
crease interest in night and ex

and'

miles
Is and

Station
ct of the Biolog-
t of 3,500 acres.'
gineering camp.
ts establishment
i surveying was
Engineering col-
as given at var-
ite. Because of
Davis was estab-

i
i
i
i
I

PAY UP!
.A few of our subscribers have"
not paid for their Wolverine
subscription as they promised
to do. Please either mail your
$1.00 to The Wolverine, Press
building, City, or bring same to
to the office this week as we
want to close our subscription
account. Thank you.

A edrrespondent, signing hun-
self John Cadogan, submitted a
communication to The Wolver-
ine on, the restaurant proposi-
tion, which will be printed of
the Writer gives his class, ad-
dress, and a 'personal verifica-
tion of all the facts.

George F. Hurley, general secretary
of the Union, returned from Pine Lake
today, where he has been spending the
week end.

/

-f

sch

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan