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August 05, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-08-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A 11 L

ER OF THE SUMMER
ITY OF MICHIGAN.
d Saturday Afternoons.
ding, Maynard Street.
Editorial, 2414.
JRS:
Daily, except Saturday.
ords, if signed, the signatures
rnt, but as an evidence of
published in The Wolverine
or mailed to the office.
eive no consideration. No
writer encloses postage.
endorse the sentiments ex-

naging Editor

.Business Manager
2738.
STANTS
iel, Jr. Robert S. Kersey

n Cochran

1920
;ION
)n Hamilton di-
:cording to their
-a lower class,
s. "The lower
iose people who
ect in question;
Zose people who
tot much; and
lose people who
single individual
n one subject, a
d an uyperclass
e things, he may
and he knows
[amilton applies
and the drama.
1walks of life,
ss of people are
ways the middle
majority enter-
y in the world,
doctrines. The
subject usually
while those who
ally silent in the
ire the cultured,
he- than conflict

ers, the general attitude of the people and greatly
increased wages played their, part. While Europe
was at war, American labor secured employment
at high prices, due to the increased demand for our
goods, and it was immediately found that the buy-
ing power of the laborers increased. Money came
easily in those days, and many of them, who were
not used to it, spent it more easily than they got
it-on luxuries, for which they were willing to pay
excessive prices. They got their wants satisfied
undoubtedly, but this new burden upon the demand
schedule, which was already way above supply, re-
sulted in even higher prices.
Throughout all this period there was a spirit of
optimism in greater wages and more profits, and
people sehed to think that the time would never
come when they would hiave to pay the piper.. Noth-
ing was too costly to -buy, aid they had the money
to pay whatever prices weer asked. It seemed to
be too much trouble to look for cheaper things;
and if an article did not increase in price 25 per
cent every three months, the people regarded the
atricle as an inferior good. Whatever is said to
the contrary, it seems to us that higher prices were
demanded by the buyers, and if the merchant want-
ed to sell his goods, he had, to comply with this
whim of his patrons.
These three things, the war which brought de-
creased production, the.increased buying power of
the people, and their attitude toward prices strike
us as being responsible for the high cost of liv-
ing. For each onoa of these things the people are
at fault, and as soon as they realize and remedy
their evils, the high cost of living will become a
myth.
Editorial Comment
A SQUARE DEAL' AL ROUND
In this business of the 'increased railroad rates it
will be remembered that the eat American pub-
lic will accept the verdict of the Interstate Com-
merce Commission as final as to the necessity for
such an increase. Moreover, it will be demonstra-
ted that the same great American public is willing
to pay a rate that is just. The American public
does not ask and will not ask that the railroads run
at a loss, for the people of this country are as fair
as justice itself.;
a Bute in return for just and fair treatment of the
railroads the people will demand a square deal from
the railroads.
They will remand that the 'railroads get out of
the coal business ad the lumber business and the
banking business and out of all other businesses
except that of a common carrier. They will de-
mand that all enterprises be protected from com-
petition with a railroad and from the unfair col-
lusion of railroads.
That much theywill demand and that much they
will have, and the railroads can depend upon it.
The enormous fortunes piled up in the oil busi--
ness, the express business, the coal business and in
some other activties have been possible only through
a use of the railroads not opep to all on even 4erms.
That has got to stop. We are told it has stopped
and will remain stopped. That is not altogether
true; but it has got to stop, and if it does not stop
the railroads may rest assured that there the great
American public will begin fir~st to consider serious-
ly the project of stopping the private operation of
railroads.
The public will do this not because it wants to
but because it"has reached the point whert it must
and will have all nien on equal footing in their
relations with the common carriers of this country.
Let private railroad management see that I this is
done and it will be as safe as a church.-The De-
troit Ne-s.
Abaft the News

AMY LOWELL IN WEST HALL
The trees and buildings shimmer,
Shuddering in the heavy heat of summer,
The classroom is a cubicle,
White, black, and dingy.'
Like the continuous strident rasp qf the locust
The voice of the professor burns in inward ear,
Then sweetly slowly
As the- full moon glides
Over horizon edge .to her haven heaven
A low threnody from tall organ pipes,
Leaving a golden track that none- may see,
Steals over the (pen window casement
And-bathes the (dessicated brains
With liquid tones.
Next to the ugly. pile of bricks that holds the class-
rooms
There stands an even uglier edifice,
It- is a church, a Baptist church,
And there the hushed dull sobbing ebbs ;nd flows
Beneath the cool wax white hands of him who'
plays.
Mfaythe Baptist God be good to him
For there is no Baptist music in those mourning
chords.
Meanwhile Elihu Root is doing great work to
establish a world court, which was the thing most
needed for world peace, after all.
As soon as ouija boards go out of use, the lumber
supply will be materially helped.
England said nix to Archbishop Mannix.

SAUNDERS'
On tle.

CANOE LIVERY
Huron iher

"iMa" Faliugs

714 Monroe St.

(Next to Cutting)

RACQUETS RESTRUNG- $1.50 to $3.50
UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE
Everything in University Supplies

NICE HOME COOKED MEALS
3 Meals pr. day $6,50 pr.wk.

rill
GLEN r

Vi :[T-AROSAns
Plants :gf All Kinds I

B

FOR, TRAVELING ANYWHERE,
You lill Enjoy Using the
A.B.A. Travelers' Checks as issued by
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50,
cashed by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc.,
tion.
ASh US-
FARMERS AND MECHAN
101-10B South ain Street 3

this

A REYOU PLAY

BluMaize Blossom

Shop.
Nickels Arcade

I

I

We have a nice line of:
TENNIS RACQUETS- $2.50 to $10.50
ALL GUARANTED
CHAMPION TENNIS BALLS- 60c each

60GM

TRUBEY'sj
218 S. MAIN ST.

I

THE ANN ARI

Confectionery
Lunches

Our Printing Is
.Like Our

When downtown stop
in and cool off.

S

Phone

I

Blue Front
Cigar Store

um m I

I

I

' M

V

Under Student Management
Corner State and Packard
~SWAIN
713 E. University Avenue
develops films
and
MAKES PRINTS
with care

Press Building
Maynard St.

, ,

I

ed. the conventions,
rant of our modern
says, "Do this" to
>opinion would call
)olish. But the ma-
iority clases follow,
tolerantly. One has
r would not care to
t is best to let mid-
majority is at least''
he experts, the ones
he subject who have
g run. Middle class
it its rule is based
f the ,past. Middle
telegraph, the tele-
ne. Rut upper class
aly to the task, and
i gets the full bene-

Official Printers to The
University of Mighigan
and its Student Public-
cations

1

T!!ANNIĀ±ARBOR DRESS

I

--1

I

I BOX LUJNCH[S AT
Decker's

PA W

~,

Delicatessen1
OPEN SUNDAYS 4 TO 6 P. M.
119 EastLiberty Street
rhone 2620M

5--
Daily Service

JA

ng to the lower class because cir-
against their learning. They belong
ass because their natures are satisfied
less.- The middle class is composed
ween. Only a few reach the heights.
there should be none are in the lower
hers are the middle class-and that
t most of us can hope for. But our
should be to have. an upper class
I9i9 Wolverine.
HIGH COST OF LIVING
ist of living is merely an actual re-
aotic set of'economic. conditions, for
ple, themselves, are directly respon-
the lest few years they thoughtlessly
a state of affairs which at the pres-
aking them all howl without cause,
ie people are basically at fault. Un-
realize that they are responsible for
sorder, the world will remain in its
on, but it now seems as if they were
ng to their senses.
biggest single reason for the present
iton is the recent war. In producing
is, and other war supplies, men were
the regular channels of industry,
ers were 'taken away from fields of
hese two things inevitably meant a
ction of goods for the public, while
rnained the same, perhaps increased.
urse than a rise could prices take,
nd suddenly became so mucfh in ex-
? And as the present prices show,

1'4

....

... .
... .

- -I

STUDENTS LUNCHI
409 E. JEFFERSON
OPEN 6 A.M. to 10:30 P.,M.
Home Baked Pies
ALWAYS LADIES
READY INVITED
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings, Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, $4,750,000.00
Northwest Corner Main & Huron
f707 North Universiy Avenue

*Y
Big Steamer -
Put-I-n-Bay
Capacity 3270 Passengers
Finest exclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest d
Ball Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra
charge for dancing.
Every day from Detroit at 9.00 a. in. for
Put-In-Bay-Connecting with Cleveland and
Buffalo Transit Co., and Steamer Arrow for
Middle Bass, Kelley's Island & Lakeside.
Sdndusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines, Fare, $1.50
Cedar P.int-15min. by ferry from Sandusky, Fare including ferry, L75
Excursion fares, (returning same day
sut-ln-Bay, week day,9Oc; Sundays, Holidays, $1.25 Round trip. .
Sandusky. evey day, $2.00 Round trip.
Four hours at Put-In-Bay; Bathing, visit the Caves, Perry's Monument,
Pavilion, Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several Hotels.
Cedar Point-Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels, Board Walk,
Thousands bathe jhere daily.
Returning Leave Sandusky 230p. m. Put-in-Bay 4.30 p. m.. Leave Cedar
Point ferry; connect at Sandusky, every day arrive Detroit 8.00 p. m.
Dancing Moonlights. Leave Ashley & Dustin Steamer Line
Detroit8.45p. m. Fare Wed.. ~ik -_-- o.-*.

6

I

& Thur,6oc Sat, &Sun.75c.
Write for map folder

Foot of Fwst St. tletroit, Mir1 .

I

I

"

- ta ... 0- " ..

FOR RENT'
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the huron R-ver

_ fl
y-
~ ...._
---
.,,_

so than in the oth-

, ,

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