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August 05, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-08-05

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I

ooe

Coal rt

AT YOUR DC
THREE TIM
A WEEK

f 1 _

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUS'7- 5, 1920

PRICE FIVE

t
i

I

ndowed University Theater Needed
For lramt, AacKaye Tells Reporter

(By P. A. S.)
' Have you ever taken dinner with a
famous dramatist?
- We hadn't either until Mr. Percy
MacKaye's visit to Ann Arbor afforded
) the opportunity yesterday evening.
And now we are prepared to tell "how'
it is done."
it necessary to be dramatic on
such an occasion? Or is-it necessary
to recite the list of thetdramatist's
works and undertake to comment,
knowingly upon them? Or is it best'
f form to merely lapse into awed
silence?
None of these is the proper course-
at least when your table companion is
> Mr. Percy MacKaye. It is only neces-
t sary that you forget your honored self
3 and simply act natural.' Which, after
r all, is about the most difficiflt thing
r possible under the circumstances..

one university alone to work out the
scheme. In order to make the under-
taking practical, there must be a chain
of university theatres so that players
might travel from one to another and
offer repertoire as demanded.
The university theatre must not be
a Little theatre. (Some two-thirds of
the so-called Little theatres are mere
fads.) It must be large enough to be
demo&ratic since the drama cannot be
exclusive by its nature. It must give
university men and women opportuni-
ties in the field of the drama which
they have been denied hitherto by toe
necessarily speculative nature of any
venture.
Movies Come to Stay
the movies? Of course they haveL
come to stay. Although they cannot]
take the place of the theatre, they can
take a place along beside it. The
voice and actual presence of .a great
actor are not lightly ,to be discarded
although the movie is recompensed,
somewhat for this loss by its being;
within the economic means of all
classes. Moreover, it-but, it's merely
time for the lecture and he would' in-l
deed be a courageous figure who dared
disappoint that expectant audience a
second time!?
And so our half-hour ended. As for.
the dinner, what need for food?

IOLD UNIVERS-ITY
EXTENSIVE CHANGE
WILL1 S11W ANEW FRONT TO
STUDENT BODY IN
FAL.
WILL PROVIDE FOR A
THEATER,SEATING 900,
Better Supports, Heating, and Acous-
tics Will iMake Ideal Place Fort
Play Production
An old stage with its sweeping wings
and domed roof, watching the shifting
panbrama of student life, has- met
time and is experiencing a change on
its own accpunt. University hall, the
veteran lecture room of the campus,
is undergoing an extensive and 'elab-
orate remodelling, and expects to show
a new front to the student body in the
fall.
When finished, the auditorium will
present a far hore theatre-like effect~'
the flanking sides of both balcony and
lower floor4rill be gone and the vista
will be straight ahead from the plat-,
form. Yet, with this change, the place
will be capacious and will meet all
ordinary demands, the main floor pro-
viding for an audience of 550 persons
while the balcony willseat 350, a totale
of 900.,
To Provide Class Roomss

erI

COSMO CLUB GIVEN
ALL LECTURE DATES,

mul-

Gathers Facts
In the course of some 30 minutes we
athered the following:
Mr. MacKaye . believes that to
,chieve the best results we must have
n endowed American theatre where
here is no hampering economic pres-
ure. Our lading universities 'must
ave their theatres for the presenta-
ion of the drama that 9they want and
hould have. But it is not possible for

JRN. LITERATURE
IO ST RIOUS
SELLARS.

I I

EXPECT ^SPIRIT
DEMOCRACY IN-
WRITING

OF

'1

. go

an literature was character-
amusing rather than serious
R. W. Sellars in his lecture:
ocracy in Literature," Tues-

inut

cea
ac-

"When I come to consider democracy
in American literature," he said, "I
am somewhat nonplussed by an appar-
ent contradiction. Here is one of the
chief sources of democracy. In Amer-
'ica, if'anywhere, we should expect the
spirit of democracy to manifest itsel
it clear and unmistakable utterance..
. Only Partially True
"And yet this is only partially the
case. Much of our literature is con-.
ventional and sentimental. It is an
amusement, rather than a serious
thing. It seldom contradicts democ-
racy, and yet it does -not express it
nobly an* daringly.
"Tl1e exception is to be found in
certain of our political documents and
speeches. The Declaration of Inde-
pendence is a truly noble document,
sincere and direct as is all great litera-
ture. And many of Lincoln'sspeeches
belong to America's contribution to the
literature of democracy. The Gettys-
burg Address and the Second Inau-
gural breathe a heartening spirit of
love for humanity and confidence in
the outcome of the struggle for liberty
and justice.
Emerson Deipocratic
"Emerson and Thoreau represented
democrats of the individualistic tradi-
tion. Self-reliance and self-sufficiency,
courage and integrity of soul are the
chords they strike. But it remained
for Whitman to proclaimI fellowship
and to express a frank pagan delight

of
3p-
ng
to

WILLI S DEAS WITH
PRINCIPLES O- TUBE
"SOME PIRASES OF WIRELESS
COMMUNICATION" SUBJECT
OF TALK
The vac um tube, known as the
audion, the kenotron, or the pliotron
oscillator in its use of wireless com-
munication, was the subpect mainly
treated in "Some Phases of Wireless
Communication," an illustrated lecture
given by Prof. N. H. Williams of the
department of physics, yesterday aft-
ernoon.'
Resonance Emphasized
Thermionic emission from hot
bodies was explained and illustrated.
The phenomena of resoAnce was em-
phasizedc as an important feature of
modern radio transmission. It was
illustrated by experiments showing the
oscillations set- up in a coil of wire
when tuned exactly to the waves that
are 'being received.
A potential difference of more than
500 volts was set up between the ex-
tremities of a coil of wire that was
entirely isolated from the high fre-
quency generat6r, the coil receiving its
energy through the electromagnet's
waves through the ether medium.
Third Electrode Featr'e
The third electrode in the tube
kniown as the grid is -the feature of
most of the tubes that makes them
useful either as detectors or as gen-
erators of high frequency waves. Two
experiments illustrated the sensitive-
ness of such tubes to the electromag-
net waves. In one it was necessary
only to ,wave a charged rubber rod
within a few feet of a short antenna
c'onnected to the grid to control; th
e itire output of. the battery, furnish-
ing considerable current.
It was pointed out in this connection
that the same operation might have
been made to control the motion, of a
battle ship. To show the amplifying
action of the tube, a two stage system
was used and a small tuning fork,
' hich made a- sound that was scarcely
audible, was pl'knly heard throughout
the room when made to operate the
telephone in the amplifier set.
Show Tube as Generator
Other experiments were shown to
illustrate the behavior of the vacuum
tube as a generator. The methods of
tuning electrical circuits by varying
the capacity of the condenser was
made apparent in one of these gen-
erator sets, since a clear musical note
was produced whose pitch could be
controlled by varying the capacity.
Heterodyne reception of undamped
waves was explained and illustrated
by experiment. The method consists
in producing in the receiver set a high
frequency oscillation at the same that
another high frequency was being
received. Both these oscillations are
beyond the audible range, but the' dif-
ference between the two frequencies is
plainly auIible. This difference .iii
tone could be heard throughout the
room.
mU

Six class rooms will occupy the
space cut from the auditorium,. The
old balcony was condemned; the sup-
ports were weak, and the whole area
was so vast that the heating system in
University Hall was inadequate. The
change will provide a staunch rest for
the balcony; useless area will be con-
verted into class rooms, and the parti-'
tioning will make heating easier.
The acoustic properties of the re-
modelled affair are questions to ihich
the future will provide the answer,
but it is certain that with the reduced
measurements. they will be better than
they have beer}. The room back of the
stage will experignce a commensurate
improvement.
*Will Be of Assistance
Though it may fail to meet the re-
quirements of the enormous lecture
sections of the history courses, it can-
not fail to be of great assistance to the
oratory and play production classes,
It is not expected that the auditorium
will fill the need for a campus theatre;
the stage is b re, the dressing rooms
lacking, nor vtill it very likely have
washroom, mirrors or things of tIat
kind. The aim is more to improve for
the routine .work of classes and lec-
tare sections.
HIGH PRICES BRING
BUSINISS TO UNION
Higher prices among the restaurants
near the campus is thought by Union
officials to be the direct cause of the
increased number of students, eating
at the cafeteria. In the past few days,
there has generally been a long line,
waiting to serve themselves in the
Union basement.
No prices at the Union will be raised
until fall, for by that time Ifennis Don-
qvan, house manager, believes that
conditions may be changed. At the
present the Union is running slightly
behind when it selts. milk and coffee
at five cents, but even when the in-
increase does come, it will not be. 100
percent, Donovan stated.
"We will wait to see what the prices
for raw goods will be in the fall and
what labor costs us, before we tack
on a few more cents to every article.
Although we try to run on a cost basis
for each food, we are not doing this at.
present on every article," Mr. Donovan
said.
"We aim to give the best possible
food to the students and to give it to
them at cost without any profit," he
added. "The Union has been doing
this and will continue, a'nd our prices
will'not be raised wholesale r or a 100
percen[."
MEDICAL DEAN IS SPENDING
SUMMER IN UPPER MICHIGAN
Dean Victor R. Vaughan of tie Med-
ical school, and his wife, are at Grand
Mission in northern Mighigan, where
they are spending their summer vaca-
tion.

Al the lecture periods of today and
tomorrow have been given over to the
Cosmopolitan club, which will present
at this time a program of international
interest. The numbers offered will be
of a diverse nature.
Rev. L. C. Douglas, of the Congrega-
tional church, will open the program
with an address this afternoon on
"The New Relation Among Nations,"
In the evening Prof. Robert M. Wen-ley
of the philosophy department, will
speak on "Nationalism:"
The second lecture of the summer to
be delivered in a foreign tongue will
be that of Mr. Julio del Toro of the
Spanish department, whose subject
will be, "Cuba-Despues de la guerra
entre Espana y los Estalos Unidos."
WORK ON HOS1PITAL
I45DAYS BHIN
Scarcity of Steel Delays Construction
of B11ilding, Costing Approxi.
° . mately $2,500,000
WEST hALL WILL STAND ONE
MORE YEAR, PARDON BELIEVES
Work on the ne $2,500,000 hospital
is now 45 days behind schedule, ac-
cording to Edward C. Pardon, superin-i
tendent.of buildings and grounds.
The delay is due to "the inability to
secure sufficient steel, the supply of}
which is snall throughout the country.
Tphe building was begun in April and
was supposed to be completed some-
time in December, but present indica-t
tions; point to a much later date as
the time of completion.
At -present most of the concrete forf
the foundations has been poured and1
work is started on the forms for thei
first floor.,s
West hall in all probability will notj
come down this -year, Mr. Pardon be-
lieves. This is because there is i-n
sufficient room for classes, which will
necessitate usingthe buifding for an-
other year at least.l
Hollister Plaased..
With Production
"A Curious Mishap' appeared for the
second and final performance Tuesday
evening in Sarah Caswell Angell hall,4
and according 'to Professor R. D. T.
fHollister, the play was a financial asl
well as a dramatic success.
"The execution met all my expecta-
tions," said Professor Hollister, "and
I was especially pleased concerningI
the way in which all members of the
cast carried out the spirit of mutual
helpfulness; no one tried to star him-
self or to subordinate the. others.
Though we were handicapped by the
lack of many things which a real stage
would provide, the determined efforts
of each one surmounted these obstaclest
"The money which we have on hand
from ticket receipts is to go toward1
making future productions successful.
It must be remembered that practical-
ly all the property of this production,
as well as other performances, is sup-
plied by dramatic organizations or
throigh proceeds from ticket sales.
"The object of the play, aside from
furnishing entertainment, was an en-
deavor to present the problems con-
cerning the theatre, to the class in
play production; the experience was
doubtless a far better lesson in play
selections, the choosing and managing
of casts, the necessity of cooperation.

and all such things, than any amount
of texts and lectures would have sup-
plied."
ART EXHIBITION AND LECTURE
TO BE IVEN NEXT THURSDAY
An exhibition of public school art
work will follow the special lecture on
"Public School Art" to be given by
Miss Emma Gratton, at 8 o'clock next
Thursday evening in room 205 of .the
Engineering building.
The work, which will be exhibited,;
has been done by the students in the
special summer course in this branch.E
Hand painted invitations are being,
sent out by memIers of the class, but
all students of the Summer session are
invited. The exhibition will be from
8 to 10 o'clock with the lecture start-
ing at 8.

SEVEN NUMBE
ANNOUNCED I
005MG EVEI

I

AlDIT ON,

TO PROGRAM
HARE PUB3LIC
LATER

SHOW IS CULMINATION
OF SPECIAL WEEK El
Zivot, Jiu Jitsu Act, Mandolin Sol
Philippine Dance, Already
on Program
A program of seven numbers .1
already been announced for the 0
mopolitan club entertainmepat at
o'clock Friday night in Sarah\ Casw
Angell hall, and several additions w
probably be made before Friday.
This international vaudeville sh
which will be produced and acted.i
tirely by members of the Cosmopolil
club, contains special fea res, wli
are characeristic of the different cot
~ies. F. C. Liu will act as master
ceremonies.
Picnic Planned
The production will be the pub
culmination of a Cosmopolitan wet
end, which has on its program seve:
lectures and a reception, but the act
ities for the club do not end until S
urday, when a basket picnic will
)ield at Whitmore lake. The arran
ments will be announced at a recept
for the club by Mr. and Mrk. Frederi
Stevens.
First on the program comes P.
Zivot, who will give two numbers
Chinese music. The accom anime
will be played by CM. Tsau..
Japanese jiu jitsu acts, -arrangel
0. Katsuizimi, will thrbw some li
upon these well known tumbling tri(
and third will come Miss Y. G. Os
wh& in costume will present a Ja
nese dance.
Elkind Will Appear
A. Elkind, a Russian from M
churia, will give several mando
solos, which have made him w
Down in previous Cosmopolitan l
enteirtainments. R. Capistraus.
scheduled to appear in'a Philii
flirtat'on dance, and he willalso g
a number of the native sor,
A Hindu stunt will be gien b,
Chavare, and Miss L. Youngs Pill
pear ip a gypsy act. Other acts, wh
areon the program, will be announ
at a later date.
MISS CONKLIN NEWBIERRY REA
GOES TO SCA OROIUGI SCIOI
Miss Hope Conklin, head Ne
berry residence and acting den-
the Summer session, will act next y
as assistant director at the Sarb<
ough school, Scarborough-on-the-i
son. jt is a dy school for boys a
girls, and Frank Vanderlip is resp
sible for it.'
Miss Conklin's main duties will
to have charged of the girls in I
school. Wilford M. Aiken, former
rector of the Ann Arbor high scho
is the director of Scarborough schoc
WHAT'S GOING ON
August 5
5 p. m.-The New Relation Among 1
tions. Rev. Lloyd Douglas.
8 p. m.-Nationalism. Pof. :.
Wenley.
August 6
5 p. m.-Cuba-Des pues de la gue1
entre Espana y 16s Estados Uni
(in Spanish, illustrated). Mr. lJu
del Toro.
8 p. m.-Cosmopolitan Night. '
Cosmopolitan Club,: (Univers
Hall.)
August 6;
5 p. m.-The Part-Time School
Connecting School' with EmplI
went. ProTf. G. E Myers.
8 p. m,-Miscellaneous Readings. '
Class in Interpretative Readi;
(University Hall.)

August 10
5 p. m.-Recent British Policies in :
dia. Prof. A. L. Cross.
8 p. m.-Medical Lecture. Dr. J.
Van Zwaluwenburg.
August 11
5 p. m.-The City of Rome in the Ti
of Augustus . (illustrated). Prof.

their

JDEN.TS
wS 'PLANT
of Prof. J. R.
classes journeyed
Sand were taken
t - hlews building
of Mr. A. Hogete,

work of
ned, and
e process
before it
the prob-
aper had

in life. Whitman was a liberator. Be-
fore him, literature was for the Amer-
ican a thing apart. It did not express
life as it was actually lived.
"Of late poetry has blossomed
afresh and in a, native, spontaneous
way. Democratic poetry must be at
the same time ,realistic and idealistic.
By realistic, I mean taking under its
recognition and interest all- sides of
life as significant. Realism gives the
touch of reality without which ideal-
ism becomes .romantic and sentimental.
It does not mean mere guile and
sordidness; it means truth to human
nature and actual human life, to its
fire and dynamic urgency as well as
to its daily bread."
Sentiments Govern Ability
The creative ability of an age de-
pends upon the sentiments, ideas and
appreciations, of the people, Professor
Sellars declared. "The sentiments we
Americans have in mind when we
think of democracy are: self-respect, a
sense of justice, a dislike of caste, a
feeling of fellowship, and an attitude
of toleration," he said "There need
(Continued on Page 4)

the

*

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