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August 03, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
ursday, and Saturday Afternoons.
Press Building, Maynard Street.
ness, 960; Editorial, 2414.
ICE HOURS:
:30 to 5:00 Daily, except Saturday.
:ceed 300 words, if signed, the signatures
ished in print, but as an evidence of
s will be published in The Wolverine
tor, if left or mailed to the office.
s will receive no consideration. No
3 unless the writer encloses postage.
necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ons.
NT, Jr................Managing Editor
ne 2414 or 12o.
. . .......Business Manager
one~ 960 or 2738.
ESF ASSISTANTS
hn J. Hamel, Jr. Robert S.. Kersey
SUE EDITORS
Hamilton Cochran
LUMN EbITOR
oward Weeks
.Y, AUGUST 3, 1920

) THE GOLDEN

roach of the fall semester, there
umors of great increases in room
es. conspiring to profiteer, and of
ding. Whether the landladies have
urize, we do not know, but there
tion to this nor any rise in prices
Like everytling else, the cost of
has gone up, and to meet the in-
>f expense, they must raise their
at little we have been able to gather
> days of 1914, it appears as though
ns have not -yet gone up more than
if they go no higher, the students
[emanded prices willingly, ;for .the
s increased Ioo percent since 1914.
;n the price of a room has gone up
portion to its quality and former
[dents have any grounds for griev-
dent is getting his money's worth
:lean room, fresh linen, good light-
nd the other requisites, he should
illingly, but if the price is above its
s the time to kick and kick hard.
dents have done nothing more than
lly, and the landladies may feel so
will raise their prices to such an
will be profiteers, if they are not so
is where their reasoning will fall
profiteer. It is common talk that
rlen are coming to Michigan in time,
:ome in the next few years, land-
rather out of date. If prices went
sharp business man, also a loyal
find it worth his while in the way
ect such a dormitory. Each time
rofiteers, she hastens the end of'her
: of her colleagues.
ut making hay while the sun shines
we also remember one about killing
id the golden eggs.
NQUETS WOULD HELPI
quet of the Men's and Women's
>s was successful. There was a
iich was quite distinct, which made
i other gatherings. The spirit of
)operation prevailed, and on every
he characteristic note of educators,
serve. Some 170 students of the
Ittended, men and women who nine
ear are superintendents, principals,
the country's schools. They had
or a sorttofpcommunion, and they
ideas on topics of common interest.
e opinion that such a gathering is
Michigan. In few other schools is
such a meeting and a like oppor-
g, mixing, and talking with leading
ich a banquet, it is poss>le to go
and to learn new phases of diffi-
No person present at the banquet
that he had wasted his time, and
d have left without grasping a new
natters and thinking that Michigan
e two of the world's best offerings.
let and the few meetings have been
of them of the same kind would
ation at Michigan and in the world.

the restaurant men admitted that five cents just
about covered costs. With prohibition and the new
prices on coffee and milk we shall probably be driven
to a point where we shall be willing to drink water.
Editorial Comment
-AUSTRALIA'S MONROE DOCTRINE
Australia has an Asiatic problem and a Monroe
doctrine closely allied to ours. If anything she feels
a still greater menace from her close geographical
position to the overflowing millions of Asia than we
do in this country, except, possibly, on the Pacific
coast, where apprehension is very strong. The peo-
ple of Australia and New Zealand are determined
that theirs shall be "a white man's country." They
repel any sort of invasion by the yellow races, peace-
ful or otherwise. r
When Australia demanded that she should have
control of all German islands south of the equator
in exclusion of Japan, limiting that country to those
north of the line, those who did notunderstand the
situation were disposed to accuse the Australians of
empire ambitions and colonial greediness. This was
a wrong estimate of the situation. It was a measure
of defense against inroad by the Asiatic races into
the South. Pacific.
This control is justified, in addition to creating a
barrier agairlst Asiatic invasion, by the principles of
our Monroe doctrine, the defense of their form of
democracy. The doctrine is defined by the Mel-
bourne Age. It says: "The voice of Australia must
be heard if our interests are to be safeguarded. In
all such rivalries as now exist there is one party
whose claims are superior to all others. In this case
Australia is that party. The principle underlying
the Monroe doctrine existed long before Monroe
lived. Territories not sufficiently developed for self-
government should prima facie be associated with
and controlled by the nearest country which' has a
stable government,"
"While that is not all there is to our Monroe doc-
trine, the principle of that doctrine justifies Aus-
tralia in guarding against any of the islands within
her geographical section falling into hands whose
government and racial instincts are antagonistic to
hers. Australia has the full right of self-protection,
especially if she recognizes that when she exercises
that right by taking control of islands populated by
people she cannot at once take into her own citizen-
ship she assumes an obligation to administer themI
for the welfare and uplift of the people, even to the
final extent of complete self-government or full citi-
zenship if such an attainment is possible. The same
obligation rests upon us in Sainoa.-St. Louis Globe-
Democrat.
JAPANESE LAND HOLDING
4A vague apprehension is in the minds of American
people living east of the Rocky Mountains, lest the
agitation in Califoriia against Japanese ownership
of land in this country should lead to international
complication. This is, of course, inspired by the
vigorous protests of the Japanese against legislation
now pending. It is probable, however, that the
Japanese people themselves do not take their pro-
testations too seriously. They have an elemental
sense of humor, which must show them the anomaly
of their position, for they are demanding of other
nations rights as aliens which they themselves do not
concede to foreigners in their own country.
The only enduring basis of diplomatic negotia-
tions is just mutual concession. There must b a
willingness to give as well as take. Before Japan
can expect to be taken seriously in its outcry against
'restrictions of Japanese land owners in Calif ornia or
elsewhere in thiscountry, she must extend to Amer-
icans the right to own land in Japan. She must
enter any negotiations with reference to the status
of her people in this cduntry, with clean hands,
otherwise her protests must be regarded as mere
petulance.--Detroit News.

11

FOR RENT

W

We have'a nice line of:
TENNIS RACQUETS- $2.50 to $10.50
ALL GUARANTED
CHAMPION TENNIS BALLS- 60c each

SAUNDERS'
On thel

CANOE LIVERY
Huron River

"Ma" Failings

714 Monroe St.

(Next to Cutting)

NICE HOME COOKED MEALS
3 Meals pr. day $6.50 pr.wk.

RACQUETS RESTRUNG- $1.50 to
UNIVER,
BOOKST
Everything in University Supj
=1!1111IIIIII1111tlllllltlllll11111111111111 lii 11111111111111111111111111111li11111ll
BETSY: ROSS : SH(
Tr E VfUIITNITAIN t'R M BEAITTiF

i

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, 4 $4,750,000.00

13-15t
Fountain RefreShi
Fine

NICKELS ARCADE

,ments
Chocolates
Fancy Gift Candy

'11

I

L

Northwest Corner Main & Huron
707 North Universiy Avenue
Blue Front
Cigar Store
Under Student Management
Corner State and Packard

THEANN ARBOR

ARE'

I

U'

Our Printing Is
Like Our

Phone

I

ii

BOX LUNCHES AT
Decker'
Dlis Lessen
OPEN SUNDAYS 4 TO 6 P. M.
119 tastLiberty Street
Phone 2620M

No.,

1

Press Buildin
Maynard St.

91

.U

I

I

SWAIN
713 E. University Avenue
develops films
.1P

Official Printers to The
University of Michigan
and its Student Public-
cations

and
MAKES PRINTS
With care

'

::===

HE ANNARBOR PRE

Abaft the News

8N CENTS, PLEASE!
a general raise in price of all meat
:e of coffee and milk has jumped from
a, on account of the war, we presume.
>f little consequence, the real feature
ner in which the restaurants kept step
of the step they took. With beautiful
made a hundred percent advance.
such uniform maneuvering points to
n and a leader in setting prices, which
asidered as in bad form.
raise was necessary ; it is not expected
-ants sell at cost, but why a precipitate
air; why a hundred percent leap?
hi units of change as pennies; eight
e mea+ nt a nf ,stv nercent-

HELP! HELP!
Where are all the contributors? One man run-
ning one of these here things is a lot busier than
the one-armed paperhanger with the hives; he needs
help.. Write me a letter, ask me questions, write
poetry, write something folks; it's a hot summer for
the colyum conductor.
A certain Mr. Cook volunteered to give his aid to
the chaperone of this colyum so I dragged him down
here to the office. Since then he has been sitting on
the small of his back in the most comfortable chair
with his feet on my desk and the most helpful re-
mark he's made has been, "My Gawd, it's hot here,
let's go to Whitmore."'
Jack Johnson, who recently arrived in these parts
from our neighboring country, Mex., North Amer.,
enjoys a distinction that few men in the eye of the
public can boast of. He was one of those that didn't
run for President.
Jack is happy, though; there's better food in Chi-
cago jails than in Mexican palaces. And more, too.
The Ann Arbor Times-News says that they had
a "Potash and Pearlmutter monologue" in the Spot-
light. Just like a solo sung by two performers.
Perlmutter also spelled wrong.

STUDENTS LUNCH
409 E. JEFFERSON
OPEN 6AM to 10:30 PM.
Home Vaked Pies
s,
ALWAYS LADIES
READY INVITED
Plants of A i1 Kind,
BluMaize Blossom
Shop
Nickels Arcade 600M
TRUBEY 'S
218 S. MAIN ST.
Coblect ionery
Lunches
When downtown stop
in and cool off.

1.

Daily Service
Big Steamer
Put-In-Bay
Capacity 3270 Passengers
Finest exclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest 0
Ball Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra
charge for dancing.
Every day from Detroit at 9.00 a. m. for
Put-In-Bay-Connecting with Cleveland and
Buffalo Transit Co., and Steamer Arrow for
Middq Bass, Kelley's Island & Lakeside.
Sanduky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines, Fare, $1.50
Cedar Peint-ISmin.by ferry from Sandusky, Fareincludingferry, 1.75
Excursion fares, (returning same day
Put-In-Bay. week day, 90c; Sundays, holidays, $1.25 Round trip.
Sandusaky, evey day. $2.00 Round trip.
Four hours at Put-In-Bay; Bathing, visit the Caves, Perry's Monument,
Pavilion, Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several Hotels..
Cedar Point- Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels, Board Walk,
Thousands'bathe here daily.
Returning Leave Sandusky 2.30 p. m. Put-in-Ba 4.30 p. m., Leave Cedar
Point ferry; connect at Sandusky, everycay arrive !Detroit 8.00 p. m.
Dancins Moonlights. Leave Ashley & Duatin Steamer Line
Detroit&45P. m. Fare Wed.
Thur. 60c Sat,&Sum75c. Foot of Frst St. Detroit, Nick.
Writ.for map foldr
In

0v a 4'$i

M. ,
*-+ 2-

I

FIN%
moo-

1 r

,1

I

IF

- -

91

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FOR RENT -
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River

I

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