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July 29, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"_:; V Z;.

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iverine

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER
[ON OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
ied Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday Afternoons.
es: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
'Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 24r4.
OFFICE HOURS:
12:oo Daily; 1 :3o to :oo Daily, except Saturday.
cations not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signatures
rily to be published in print, but as an evidence of
notices of events will be published in The Wolverine
retion of the Editor, if left or mailed to the office.
communications will receive no consideration. No
will be returned unless the writer encloses postage.
Iverine does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex~
the communications.
)N W. SARGI NT Jr..............Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 120.
F. HIL LERY...................Business Manager
Phone 960 or 2738.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS
Chapman John . Hamel,U E Jr. Robert I Kersey
ISSUE EDITORS '

am H. Riley

Hamilton Cochran

COLUMN EDITOR
Howard Weeks

THURSDAY, JULY 29, 1920
IE HARM OF JUNIOR COLLEGES
tever great part the Junior colleges are des-
play in relieving the congestion of univer-
Lsw Dean Effinger recently said they might, the
I supporters of great universities and colleges
only a menace in their continued growth. It
e admitted that the junior colleges can serve
4in end by keeping in school for two more
tudents .who otherwise would drop out on
tion from high school and in caring for some
younger high school graduates, but the ardent
:s of the universities can see an evil resulting
his system, which offsets any of the benefits
I from taking care of the college overflow.
danger is that of disruptiig'the University
the presence of which has made college days
>yable for thousands. It is during the first
cond years in a university that the spirit of
for an institution develops. In thisperiod,
he friendly competition in campus activities,
eting and making of friends, and the witness-
id participation in intercollegiate contests
levelops a spirit, which makes the last two
>f university life and the memories of the
a veritable Paradise. The first two years
ege days prove the foundation for what is to
ater. During these days, the freshman easily
tO the spirit and the traditions of an institu-
the old customs come in. time to mean much,
ey are readily understood and lived up to by
tderclassmen. These young men learn the
a'nce of being the under dog for the time
and they gain a certain respect for tradition
recognition of other people's ability. After
g through this period of probation and ap-
eship, they realize that there is an intangible
o a great university, such as Michigan, which
understood and appreciated only through
ervice. By the time they are upperclassmen,
now, in short, what it is all about, not only
ards academic learning but also as regards
-sity life, which many people consider the
al thing of a college education.
Junior colleges would deny this to future
sity men. Spending their first two years in
:ollege where there is little if any spirit, Junior
students would enter the University for their
o years of work and miss all that they should
ained. These Junior college graduates would
o the universities, and by the very nature and
zation of the campus activities would be ex-
from'them, even if they did want to partici-
Most of them, however, would sit back and
i the glory that the hard work of others had
ed,. if glory could be achieved through the
>f a limited number of spirited men. They
be denied the privilege of meeting men, learn-
traditions, and making friends, which :the
.t years of the university life would ripen into
g comradeship. The underclassmen days
be lost to them, the days which lay the found-
r the two great years before graduation. The
>f the University would be something, which
ight possibly secure by the end of their two
but they could not enjoy it, as though they
vays been in the university.. As alumni they
not feel moved by that spirit, which brings
ids of alumni back for the football games,
reunites them at class gatherings at com-
nent time, and which makes college men have
ion bond when meeting in different corners of
>rld. Perhaps indeed, some few of these
college students might come into the spirit
universities, but it is to be doubted if most
r number could and if they would have the
egree of ardor of a four-year man. The ma;
>f them would be alien to their alma mater.
the entire or partial los of the spirit of uni-
life that makes us doubt the desirability of
colleges, and question whether after all the
college does benefit a real university like
an.4
41ENTION THE WOLVERINE
re any business or commercial house, enters
ontract for a given thing, it generally makes

it the money expended will bring in a pro-
ite amount of profits.

At the beginning of the summer THE WoLvERINE
found that expenses had increased to such an extent
that the advertising rates were necessarily raised to
meet in a certain measure the higher operating costs.
Some of our advertisers failed to see the justice
of the raise, others had to cut down on the amount
of advertising, and some of the most loyal ones con-
tinued and even increased their space. Many of
them, perhaps, fail to see that the money expended
for this brings them in actual profits, but their belief
in student life and its ultimate growth has caused
them to support the publication by their advertising.
Through the support of these advertisers, the sub-
scribers to THE WOLVERINE are enabled to obtain
three times a week reports of past and future events
that happen on the campus. The subscription price
to the paper does not begin to pay the cost of pro-
duction; the advertising makes up the difference.
For this reason, the fact that the subscriber reaps
the benefits from THE WOLvERINE'S advertisers and
that our continuance is made possible through adver-
tising, we ask our subscribers to patronize. the firms
that advertise in this paper and in so doing to men-
tion that they read the firm's ad in THE WOLVERINE.
In this way the business houses may soon learn that
their advertising does bring in substantial returns.
Editorial Comment
RUNAWAY STRIKES
The strike which has closed 90 per cent of the
coal mines in Illinois and threatens to close the re-
mainder in the face of the most serious coal situa-
tion which the nation has faced in years has been
branded by Frank Farrington, head of the miners
in this state, as a "runaway strike." When it started
among a few day workers in downstate mines Far-
rington was reported to have said that he was mak-
ing every effort to bring about peace, but was unable
to control the men.
Now the strike has gained such proportions that
it threatens to extend to Indiana, Ohio, and western
Pennsylvania. If the day men's demands are grant-
ed here it is believed that similar demands and simi-
lar strikes will follow in every unionized bituminous
coal field in the country.
A somewhat similar situation developed in the
runaway strike of switchmen last spring. The lead-
ers of established and recognized unions asserted
they could not cotrol the men. The result is well
known. We are still paying the bill in congestion
and freight delays.
If labor leaders are se powerless to control the
men, by what authority do they represent them?
If union agreements can be so easily abrogated, of
what advantage is ii for employers to make such
agreements?
"Runaway strikes" are coming to be the greatest
menace to the cause of conservative, substantial or-
ganized labor that it has ever known. They allow
the radical, irresponsible, uncontrolled minority to
cast a blight upon the entire union labor cause.
The ordinary citizen who makes up the great un-
organized mass of the population is not inclined to
differentiate between a "runaway strike" and a sane-
ly authorized strike when his coal bin is emptied,
his supply of food cut off, -or his transportation
blocked. The results are what count with him.
Generally he will blame these results upon unions,
without regard to details.
It is a task for intelligent, self-respecting union1
men to see that they and their cause is not so stig-
matized. They can do so by seeing to it that "run-
away strikes" are deprived of their support, either
moral or material, and that leaders who are neither
representative nor responsible are likewise deprived
of support.-The Chicago Tribune.
Abaft the News
Why is it in the movies that the heroine always
awakes from a troubled sleep with her hair beauti-
fully upholstered and the map enchantingly enam-
eled 'Tain't so in real life; at least that's what

they tell mme.
NO, DARN IT, IT WASN'T A WOMAN
"HIT ON HEAD;
CAN'T TALK"
-Headline.
SHOCKING, WATT?
"Wanted-Current pickers."-Liner.
Didja ever wake up
In the middle of the night
And hear thunder rumbling around
About over Whitmore Lake
And a rainy wind blows
Through your open window
And you lie awake,
Waiting for the rain
So you can get up
And close the window
And you lie awake -
And you lie awake
And you lie awake
And finally
The %-,$'& *. ?-thing
Blows over
And it doesn't rain at all?
Daughter-"Arthur kissed me on the forehead
last night."
Mother-"Horrors! Didn't you-call him down?"
Daughter-"I should say I did."

Laugh Causes Strike
North Hudson, N. J., July 29.-Be-
cause their employers,1aughed at their
demands and refused them, barbers
went on strike.

i

SOT

il

FOR RENT

Now it Ca
Daisy Ash
The Party
Mince Pi(
Mary Ma
Best Short
Further C

SAUND19RS' CANOE LIVERY
On the Huron River
p

UNIe i
WAHR'SBOOK
Everything in University St

'HALLER & FULLER
JEWELERS
State Street
SVIO[[IS-ROS[S

A'

THE ALLY OF EVERY OTHER SPORT -
KODAK
FOR KODAK AMATEURS: THIS STORE IS G. H.
Cameras, Photographic Helps and Conveniences
that make Picture Making all the Easier,-Filfn
and Paper
EVERYTHING'S HERE
LYNDON AND COMPANY
719 NORTH UNIVERSITY

E RECENT PUBLICATI(
WORTH WHILE
an be Told, . . By Gibbs
ford . By Author of Young Visitors
gee . . . By Joseph Lincoln
e .By Morley
rie . . . . By Porter

$3.(
2.C
2.C
1.

Plants of All Kinds
Blu Maize Blossom

t Stories of 1919
.hronicles of Avonlea

Shop
Nickels Arcade

By

600M

9--

.i

I

Blue Front
Cigar Store
Under Studet Man-
agement.

FOR TRAVELING ANYWHERE, ANY TIME
You Will Enjdy .sing the,
A.B.A. Travelers' Checks 'as issued by this bank.
come in denominations of $10,$20, $50, and $100, an
cashed by Banks, Hotels, Railroads; etc., without iden
tion.
-- ASKUS - -
FARMERS AND MECHANICS BAr
101-105 South Main Street 830 South, State

Ui

Corner State and Packard
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
r, wheether the account be large
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, $4,760,000.00
Northwest Corner Main & Huron
707 North Universiy Avenue
"Ma" Failings

I

'_ j

A Place for Panicular

NAIA

l'

"

5 Nickels Arcade
Expert Parcelling

i

r

714 Monroe St.

(Next to Cutting)

NICE HOME' COOKED MEALS
$ Meals pr. day ?6.60 pr.wk.
STUDENTS LUNCH
409 E. JEFFERSON
OPEN 6A.M.to 10:30 P.M1
Home V aked Pies

We Have
ELECTRIC FANS

I

to keep cool with during the warnweather'of July and, Augus
PURITAN OIL COOKERS;
PICNIC OUTFITS,
FISHING TACKLE,
FLASHLIGHTS AND BATTERIES.
The Ever-Ready Contest ends this week. Make a guess.

ALWAYS
READY

LADIES
INVITED

i

I

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M. D. LRN ARNED
STATE STREET HARDWARE
PHONE 1610 310 S. STATE ST.

wI
S

SWAIN
7M3 E. Jniversity Avenue
develops films
and'
MAKES PRINTS
with care

Delicious Special Bricks
Every Sunday
Get One from Our Dealer
Next Sunday
won n orw

I!

-..

TRUBEY'S
218 S. MAIN ST.

Confectionery
Lunches

When downtown stop
In andcool off.

Sold at the best Soda Foun
in over Three Hundred M
gan Towns and Cities.
C. A. CONNOR ICE CREAM
416 FOURTH STREET

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY$
On tie Huron River

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