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July 29, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-29

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Yitw

J~nlurizw

AT YOUR

THREE TIN~

A WEEK

a

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 29, 1920

PRICE'FIY

_
r.

I100 PLAN TO TAKE
PUT-IN-BAY TRIP

More than 100 persons have signified
their intention of making the trip to
Put-in-Bay tomorrow under the diiec-'
Lion of the geology department, ac-
cording to Mr. F. W. Frostic, who will
conduct the excursion.
The party will leave Ann Arbor at
6:37 o'clock, AnnArbor time, and will
connect at Detroit for the steamer
Put-in-Bay, on which the journey will
be made to the island. While'-there
will be a geological study of some of
the earth's features, an attempt will
be made to make the trip interesting
from a popular viewpoint, -and in so
doing the historical, industrial, and
geographical side of the trip will alsa

,I,

omen's

Kra

be emphtsized.
The Put-in-Bay trip is made each
,1 year during the Summer session, so
n the success of such a trip is practically
,e assured, basing calculations in former
,n journeys. The ride will take the form
of an excursion for some, who will
merely take the trip for the pleasure.
Plans have been formulated to make
the trip interesting for these persons
r also.
PROF. BRUMM TLKS,
nABRUT JURALS
n Loses Nothing by Comparison with
Literature When Facts Are Pre-
sented Accurately, He Says
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TWO IN.
WAY OF HANDLING SUBJECT
d Journalism loses nothing by com-'
parison with literature when equal to
its task of presenting facts accurately
and fearlessly, declared Prof. J, L.
Brumnm, of the.Rhetoric department,
in his address on "Newspaper Eng-
s lish," given in the Natural Science
auditorium Tuesday afternoon. The
real question involved in a study of
newspaper English is whether it per-
forms the business of reporting what
is important for us to know, he said.
Journalism Reports
The difference between journalism
r and literature is the way in. which
each handles a subject, the speaker
stated.- Journalism reports a fact,
- while literature recreates it and is
c concerned with the incident as it ex-
e presses some universal truth. Jour-
- nalism is impersonal; literature, born
;. of the creative impulse, is an expres-
s zion of personality.-
. Journalism gives us information and
- literature gives insight. Literature is
I never produced by a-conscious effort
- not to be journalistic, Newspaper fea-
tures, human interest stories, and edi-
torials sometimes rise to the plane of

BREAT EXTENSION
OF ACTIITIESIS.
PLANN EDBY UNION
THREE OFFICERS NOW FORIU-
LATING WORK FOR
FALL
RECEPTION COMMITTEE
TO HAVE MORE DUTIES
Two Departments Under Recording
Secretary Are to be Created,
Say Officials
A great extension of Union activities
is being planned for next fall, and the
three officers of the Union, Homer
Heath, general manager; George Hur-
ley, general sec'retary, and Paul Eaton,
'21, president, are at work formulating
the plans.
The fall reception committee, the
,function of. which is to care for the
incoming students in the fall, will be
made one of the largest committees of
the Union. Under its direction will
come the canvassing, of the entire city
for rooms and a classification of them.
Students will be assigned rooms by
this committee.
Will Register Members
The reatiso rcommittee will also
compile a registration list, which will
be kept up to within a few hoirs of
the latest enrollment, and a sub-com-
mittee will tend to the registering of
all men as Union members. Another
part of its work will be to see that
proper publicity is obtained.
A reorganization of the entertain-d
ment committee will.be effected, and
its new duties will consist in conduct-
ming all meetings, receptions, and en-
tertainments, skits, and shows in the
Unicn. Under this committee, i( is ex-
pectea that the Union will assist the
various classes and departments in
giving their customary smokers.
The reorganization is expected to
enable a definite program to be main-
tained and to permit an extension and
unity, which the old system did not do.
Open Up Card List
Union officials are also planning toi
open up the registration cards to all
the campus actiities, which can,look
through them for possible material.
Two departments under the recor
ing secretary will be created, the
Union officials report. One will care
for the registration blanks and. the
other will record the work done by
the different members of the commit-
tee.
Through this reorganization and ex-
tension of activities, Union officials
hope to bring the benefits of the UnionA
to more students and to democratizej
the activities, which lately have fallent
on a smaller number of men,

DRAMATIST TO GVE
READING TONIGHT
Percy MacKaye, the celebrated
dramatist, will give a reading, "George
Washington," at 8 o'clock this evening
in the Natural Science auditorium. He
is probably the most prominent man
who will be here on the program this
summer. Although he has become es-
pecially famous as a writer, MacKaye
is said to be an excellent speaker.
At 5 o'clock this afternoon Prof. J.
R. Hayden of the political science de-
partment lectures on "The Problem of
the National Budget." Professor Hay-
den,,devoting a large part of his time
to study of the national government,
is well qualified to speak on this sub-~
ject.
Tomorrow afternoon at the same
hour Prof. L. C. Karpinski of the
1 mathematics department is scheduled
for a lecture of educational interest.
His subject will be, "Teachers' Sal-
aries and the Cost of Living."
Mr. R. K. Immel of the oratory de-
partinent on Friday evening will read
Shaw's "The Devil's Disciple" in the
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. No educa-
tional motion pictures will be shown
this week.
ENIRONMENT HAS
.ITTLE IF~ UENCE
SHULL
Man Not Made What He is by Su
roundings, Declares Zoology
.Man in Lecture
PRODUCES DATA TO PROVE
TRUTH OF HIS STATEMENT
Proclaiming the falseness of the idea
that man is what his environment
makes him, and producing certain
proofs substantiating his attitude,
Prof. A. Franklin Shull, of the zoology
department, treated on the subjects of
heredity and environment, in the Nat-
ural Science auditorium Wednesday
afternoon.
That many foolish assumptions have
been built up on mere coincidences to
further theories on the effect of en-
vironment, and that such ideas have
largely been fostered among socialists
and -sociologists, were the opinions of
the speaker, who maintained als6 that
scarcely ever are two people very sim-
ilar in trait and character; that even,
twins are rarely alike in their desires.
and abilities.
'Produces Data
As proof of his contention, Professor
Shull produced data gathered from
studies of "identical twins." The
technical difference between normal
twins and identical twins, as explained
at the lecture, is that the latter spring
from the same life germ, while the
former come from double seeds. I
Examples of identical twins wereI
cited and pictures of them cast upon
the screen. It was explained that they
were not only similar in features but
invariably of the same sex and had
the same desires, tastes, and disposi-
tions, and often the same height,
weight, voices, complexion, color of;
hair and eyes.
Environment Would Show
Somet of these had lived together.
some apart, yet different environments
in the latter case had not riven their

characteristics. The speaker said that
environmjent, if it be the weighty in-
fluence which some claim, would show
in these cases.
The effects of environment are tem-
porary, according to Professor Shull,
and only in exceptional cases, where it
directly affects the germ plasms, can
it be lasting and passed down to ay
following generation. He added that
such cases were infrequent and mostly
limited to alcoholism and in a lesser
degree temperature.

PLEASEI
A number of Wolverine subscrib-
ers have missed their papers, and
upon investigation have found
that someone else had been getting
it after the; carrier had delivered
it. Our -carriers are placing your
paper on the porch and you should
get it every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday. If not, phone 960,
and let us know.
If-you are not a subscriber it is
unfair to the owner of the paper
to take it before he sees it. Be' as
generous as he -is; return itB
If you have not had an oppor-
tunity to subscribe, please phone
960, and we will put you on the
subscribtion list.
TWO ARTISTS, NEW TO CITY,
APPEAR ON MUSIC PROGRAM
Two artists, Frank L. Thomas and
Howard Rufus, who had- never before
appeared on a musical program in
Ain Arbor, were well receiyed, as
were the other artists on the School
of Musictconcert program which was
given last night' in Hill auditorium.
From a musical standpoint the pro-
gram was well built, the feature being
several numbers for two pianos. Mrs.
G6orge B. Rhead and Mrs. Maud Ok-.
kelberg contributed these two groups
of duets. A large audience was present.
DOCTOR OF FUTURE MUST
PREETDSAE-EB

REMEDIAL MEASURES
IT WILL HAVE TO
TAKEN

INDICATIONS POINT TOWARD GRBEAT
DEVELOPMENT O UMM ESION
APELMUST BE MADE TO TEACHE

AGAINST
BE

Kayser, 6-2,

appears to be the stron
for first honors in the
his opponents will hav
top him.
ad Anderson won from E
s in the second round of
-3, 2-6, 6-2; -Custer and
low and Wells, 6-2, 6-2.
the Stoddard and Burle
Merkel match will play
if the Bowers and San
Itors of the Hess and
reenwood and Harris m
ictions as to the outc
ibles favor the Bowers'
air.
.re still several matche
I round of the singles
been played.

igest 'Failure of journalism thus far -to
sin- fulfill its high mission was attributed
e to to partisanship, lack of adequately
trained. men, and .to the methods used
Eiley as a means of building up circulation.
the Must Say it Properly
Stull The writers deserving of respect are
The those who have something to say and
Y vs. who say it properly. Artificial and
y the affected style invites disaster and de-.
chez serves contempt. Newspaper English
Sar- suffers most from hackneyed vocabu-
atch. Caries an& set ways of expression.
com Newspapers. present the swift-mov-
and ing life of today, and too many pre-
sent life only at its lowest level, Prof.
s in Brumm declared. Others exercise'
that good taste and understanding.
Discussing the technique of news;
writing, Prof. Brumm said the con-
TS struction of a news article reverses
LOG the method of a literary work.
News writing is expedited by this'
method, and uniformity in practice
n at gives a paper essentially the same
g a style. Technical requirements' are
con- also the cause of many of the gravest'
010- faults in news writing.

WHAT'S GOING ON

-I

F-

I

July 29
5 p. m.-The Problem of 'the
Budget. Assistant Prof. J.
den.

National
R. Hay-

8

p. m.-Author's Reading. Mr. Percy
14acKaye.

The doctor of the future will have
to devote himself to preventing dis-
ease and to the application of reme-
dial measures against it, Dr. Hugh
Beeb , of the homoeopathic medical
school faculty, said Tuesday evening in
speaking on "Our Medical Future."
"If an individual dies before his ex-
ypectancy, in the majority of instances
he has either been killed or has com-
mitted suicide. This is not true in
the legal sense, but in our present
knowledge as to the origin and cause
of disease, we know that in most in-
stances the conditions that brought
about the death were preventable.
Negligence Responsible
"Personal negligence and commun-
ity negligence in regard to sanitary
affairs is largely responsible. -The
problem of the medical educator is to
train the young man not only in the
measures used to attack the disease
and the origin and causes of that dis-
ease, but to give him the vision of the
possibilities of preventive medicine.
Unpleasant Results
Certain unpleasant consequences
have presented themselves; for in-
stance, the increasing obstacles- to en-
tering medicine have increased the
number of non-medical cults and the
production of untrained men who prey
upon the public. The greatest danger
of the cult practitioner is not that he
claims to make impossible cures, but
that he does not know that he cannot
make them.
PROF. MYERS' CLASS IS TO
VISIT DETROIT SCHOOLS
Prof. George Myers' class in com-
pulsory part time schools will make
a trip to Detroit to visit the continua-
tion schools of that city, which are
conducted at Burton and Cass Tech-.
nical schools.
The schools are under the direction
of the University department of edu-
cation. -
PRESIDENT BURTON'S SPEECH-
GETS HALF PAGE IN WORLD
The New York World, in its issue
for Sunday, July 25, gave one-half of;
its front page in a news section to the
speech which President Burton made
to students in the' Summer session on
July 1.

MICHIGAN HAS ENROLLED 2,
BEING THE FIF'[H IN
l SIZE
ENROLLMENT OF 3,500
EXPECTED IN 5.YEA
Number and Quality of Courses M
be Extended if Prestige is
to be Held
(By Observer)
Present indications' point tow
great development of the Michi
Summer session in the . near futi
and if the expected progress is m
the University will soon have a s1
mer term which will make it equal
superior to such universities as
lumbia, Wisconsin, Chicago, and C
fornia.
At the present time the Michij
Summer session with its enrollai
of 2,250 is the fifth in the coun
with Columbia, numbering 9,685; 0
cago, enrolling approximately 5,0
California, including about 4,000 s
dents, and Wisconsin, totaling aro
3,500, ahead of it.
Kraus Makes Estimate
Prof. E. H. Kraus, dean of the Si
mer session, has made an estimate
between 3,500 and 4,000 students
Michigan in another five summers.
qualifies his 'statement,, however,
saying, "This development will c
provided that the right type of insti
tion can be offered those primarily
tereyted in summer work."
It can be expected that the enr
ment estimated by Dean Kraus oan
reached and even exceeded if Mi
gan develops along the line tow
which it has been progressing in
last five years.
This progress must be made in
number and quality of courses offe
in the educational and other dept
ments, whose work is primarily c
cerned with teachers who have cc
to do graduate work, to work for
grees, or to take special work.
Fals to Induce
In the past Michigan has been
hind the times in offering the pro
inducement for teachers to take .si
mer work here, and conseque
those four universities, which h
done this, have passed Michigan in
rollment. These four schools h
all paid particular attention to i
type of student, with the result t
their summer sessions are crow
with teachers taking work.
It is along this line that the de
opment will come, and there is a sli
chance of increase in another bra
that of the regular students tak
work. If there is sufficient back
from the administration, it can be
pected that a larger number of, und
graduates will study during the si
mer.
This is especially true of the e
neering college, where the strict
quirements make attendance at o
summer school almost necess
There is apt to be a growing tende
on the part of the regular students
them to stay for one summer sess:
either to get through the course ear
or to make easier their winter w
Increase Coming
However, the main development
probably come from an increase in
number of teachers here, which we
mean a greater registration in the (
lege of Literature, Science, and
Arts -and the Graduate school. '
element can be 4ttracted by qne th
only-a more extensive curriculu
educational work.

With this in view, endeavors for
last five years have been made to o
a wider program in education,
Ithese efforts are beginning to i
fruit. Only this last year Prof. G.
Whipple, formerly of the Carnegie
stitute of Technology, and recogni
as one of the greatest educational
fhorities in the country, was secun
for the Michigan faculty, and-Prof
S. Berry returned to the Univers
In addition, S. E. Courtis, who de
oped the arithmetic tests, has give
number of lectures here.
Work Halted
Aogreater indication of the ree
advance can be seen. in the inten

July 30
5 p. m.-Teachers' Salaries and the
Cost of Living. Prof. L. C. Karpinski,
8 p. m.-Reading, Shaw's "The Devil's
Disciple." Mr. R. K. Immel. (Uni-
versity Hall.)
July 81
5:30 a. m.-Excursion to Put-in-Bay,
Lake Erie, under the direction of
,Assistant Prof. I. D. Scott, via Mich-
igan Central Railroad to Detroit and
steamer to Put-in-Bay.
August 2
5 p..m.-The Camp Fire Movement in
Modern Education (illustrated.) Mr.
L. F. Scott,. New York City.

..1J4.. - ... . g a ..
ts of the Biological statio
lake have been issuin
aper, The Biolog, which
news of the summer bi
ion. With about 50 stud
suap, a large subscripflon

ents
- list

.ms and special articl#*
uterest -around the camp
in the paper. ,

DIRECTORY OF MICHIGAN MEN
IN DETROIT TO BE ISSUED
- A handbook and directory of t he
Michigan alumni in Detroit is to be
published by the University of Mich-
igan club of Detroit, it was decided at
the July 17 meeting of the society.
Dues were increased to $5 a year,
and the fiscal year was changed from
that of the calendar to one which be-
gins July 1, as this corresponds with

I I

COMING

1,

RY OF

)INTMENT
IS VACATION

Monday-Tuesday, August 2, 3 In
SARAH CASWELL-ANGEL HALL
"A CURIOUS MISSAr"
A Tale of Love Triumphant by Carlo Goldoni

Tickets- 50c - 75c

Reserved at Wahr's

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