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July 24, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAPER OF THE SUM
GRSITY OF MICHIGAN.

sday, and Saturday Afternoons.

Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street,
Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
OFFICE HOURS:
aily; 1 :30 to s5:oo Daily, except Saturday
t to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa
e published in print, but as an eviden
f events will be published in The Woly
he Editor, if left or mailed to the office.
ications will receive no consideration.
eturned unless the writer encloses postag
es. not necessarily endorse the sentiment
unications.
ARGLNT, Jr..............Managing E
Phone 24r4 or 120.
,ERY......................Business Mai
Phone 6o or 2738.

dared such a thing; now the number with cut hair
is very large, it being almost an accepted social cus-
tom. But even yet there is a certain group of peo-
MER ple-they might, be considered Puritanic by some-
who frown .upon this as a wicked thing. Yet we
- wonder if they are the one at fault, when they con-
sider this an evil act. Many of these highly ethical
people might change their beliefs if they knew that
the Puritan of more than three hundred years ago
Bobbed their hair, and that the people, wvh opposed
it, were the social aristocracy. But such is the case
for we find a writer in the time of James I, taking
tures exception in these words to the growing custom of
ce of bobbing the hair: "She would out and cut her hair
erine to the despicable fashion of the Puritan:"
No And so the world goes on, with conventions
e- changing all the time. The people of one age forbid,
s ex-
their descendants accept. The opposition of one
- period becomes the radical class of the next, but
;ditor despite all the bitter, petty conflicts over what is
right and what is wrong, the world goes on.
nager

GREEK ART EXHIBIT
GOES TO BAY VIEW
Bay View, Mich., is the next place
where the Greek art exhibit will be
sent. Miss Marie Economidy, red.e-
sentative of the Greek governmen~t,
returned yesterday from making ar-
rangements, . and Sunday she will
move the exhibit from Ann Arbor,
where it has been for the past three
weeks.
During this period there has been
an unusually large attendance for the
size of the city, approximately 7,000
individuals having visited the exhibi_.
On Sundays and Saturdays from 50
to 700 people have attended, bu1 on
week days the average has not been
so high.
For approximately 10 days the ex-
hibit will be at Bay View, a summer
resort, and as yet no place has beeA
booked for August. The first two
weeks in September it will be shown
in Detroit, and from there the exhibit'
goes to Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Min-
neapolis, the University of Iowa:.
Cleveland, Washington, and requests
from San Francisco have been re-
ceived, but complete arrangements
have not yet been made.

SOM~

Now it Can b(
Daisy Ashford
The Partygee
Mince Pie:
Mary Marie
Best Short Sto
Further Chron

RECENT PUBLICATI(
WORTH WHILE
e Told, . . . By Gibbs
1 . B"I Author of Young Visitors
By Joseph Lincoln
By Morley
B Porter
ries of 1919 . By O'Brien
Biles of Avonlea By Montgomery

$3.00
2.00
2.00
1 . 75
1.90
2.00
1.65

IAN

UNIVERSITY
.BOOKSTORE
Eve rvth ing in University Supplies
FOR TRAVELING ANYWHERE, ANY TIME
You Wlil Enjoy l11ing the
A.B.A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50, and $100, and are
cashed by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identifica-
to.

NESS ASSISTANTS
Tohn J. Hamel, Jr. Robert L. Kersey

Wilson's old reliable went back on him the other
day, when Colonel House, whose record for silence
has previously equalled that of the Sphinx, broke
out with a statement.

EDITORS

Ri

H milt Cnhran

im . t eynamnton ocnran
COLUMN EDITOR
Howard, Weeks
SATURDAY, JULY 24, 1920
.RE WE GAINING OUR END?
living in an age of .rapid change and prog-
order to keep abreast of the times one must
n the alert for new thingswonderful in-
marvelous scientific discoveries, and all the
nous movements. that seek to make for a
I finer civilization. To this end we come to
ersity. But the question ever arises, "Are
g our end?"
can be no fixed standard for deciding this
ant question for men; each must decide jn
mind just whether he is getting what he,
res from his college education. There is,
one element in the make-up of every man
not be overlooked, if one is to consider the
on of a well balanced man. That is, the
rnent.
strenuous movement of the material world
ually lost in the passage of events. Each
new phase of human knowledge is un-
>me new patent, or invention comes on the
irplanes flying overhead make distance an
gligible quantity; and Einstein, with his
itation theory, comes to make us wonder
s all about. And yet, we. are really no
e ultimate goal than our forefathers were
Isaac Newton announced his discovery of
f gravity.
our universities are full of students, seek-
ledge. concerning law, medicine, engineer-
vhat-not. Yet, there is just as much sick-
as many law suits, and fully as many pa-
he dentist's chair as there were years ago.
. better equipped hospitals have been built,
are all crowded. Amendments have been
I new laws have been passed, yet the ever
egal profession finds plentx to do. Surely
is wrong somewhere.
mething is wrong. In a material world,
for material things there will always be
wrong. We must- first realize that there
nature something which craves more than
tins and pleasures can ever give us. Man
n him an immortal substance that reaches
things above the 'sordid realm of every-
-we call it Soul. And just so long as we
:his fact, just that long will we seek in vain
e goal.
on, no matter what it may give us in the
'ademic knowledge, has fallen far short if
teach us that. "Are we gaining our end in
school work?" It is a question we A.l
:k to answer.

Can you ever imagine anyone striking because of
too great an increase in wages?
Editorial Comment
POLITICS AND ECONOMICS
A Washington dispatch to The World states that
"Administration officials'' are both worried and
angry over the reports of slackening industry. They
do not like the shutting down of mills and the laying
off of employes. Nobody likes it, so far as we
know, but the question is whether these are not the
inevitable consequences of our whole credit situation
and the condition of trade. The Administration offi-
cials, quoted but not named, are said to be not of
that opinion. They suspect a political moti)e. They
think that they see "evidence of an inclination on the
part of certain railroads and corporations to slow up
business." The object is-plain to the vigilant eyes of
these Government authorities. They detect a pur-
pose to injure the Democratic Administration and,
by inference, to aid the Republican Party in the
Presidential campaign.
Before dismissing this as merely a piece of mid-
summer madness it is well to ask, first, what the
facts are. Knowledge of them is furthered by a re-
port just i'ssued by the Department of Labor. It
covers the results of an investigation of fourteen
diversified industries widely scattered throughout
the country. They represent manufactures of steel
and iron, silk, cotton, leather, wool, etc. All the
plants examined show payrolls higher in 1920 than
in 1919, with the volume of employment also greater
during the first five months of this year. But in
June, 1920, a change set in. Nine of the fourteen
industries reveal a falling off in the number of men
at work and seven a decrease in the total of wages
paid.
These statistics agree fairly well with the general
impression. They bear out the predictions of mer-
chants and bankers and the observations of com-
mercial agents. That a letdown in industry was
bound to come our best informed economists have
been long warning the country. They were not
thinking of a possible "political move"; that did not
enter at all into their forecasts. They were simply
studying the facts and the laws of trade. They were
basing their conclusions upon past experience. That
experience has shown that a period of expanded or
inflated credit and of abnormally high prices is in-
variably followed by forced liquidation, by restricted
output, by hesitation in industrial enterprise, by fall-
ing prices and lessened employment. The change
was bound to come, these skilled readers of the signs
in the financial heaven have been telling us ; theonly
doubt in their minds being when it would come and
with what degree of violence. Happily, thus far the
business reaction has not been extreme. There has
been no evidence or thought of a financial panic. We
may confidently hope that there will not be, and that
the necessary readjustments will be gradual. But
the thing which we must hold to, if we are to keep
our minds clear of cant, is the fact that all these in-
dustrial changes are the. result, not of political
scheming, but of economic law.
The last thing to be thought of is governmental in-
terference when any such strong. industrial tide be-
gins to run. Official reddling would only make
matters worse. By this we do not mean that the
Government should not exercise its legitimate func-
bions, at this time and at all times. It can aid by
spreading a knowledge of the truth about the situa-
tion. It may render help by giving orders to expe-
dite the transportation of goods and of raw mate-
rials and of fuel; it may do something in the way of
making labor more mobile, so that unemployment
may not become unnecessarily acute ; its work of in-
spection and of law enforcement may be kept up in
the various industries. But to attempt to go far be-
yond such efforts, and to seek to compel mills to run
whether they have orders or not, and to threaten
with official pressure companies that are prudently
taking in sail and making the economies which the

occasion demands, would surely be to aggravate the
evil. Governments can do many things, but they
cannot suspend the laws of nature or the laws of
trade. And the sooner any idea of working a
miracle is given up the better.-The New York
Times.

FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK
101-105 South ain Street 33) South State Street
(Nickels Arcade)

I

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U

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FOR RENT
SAUJNDERS' CANOE LIVERY
On the Huron River
HALLER & FULLER
JEWELERS
State street
Ma Failings

A Place for Particular People

I

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5 Nickels Arcade

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E xpert JiarcellingI

714 Monroe St.

(Next to Cutting)

NICE HOME COOKED MEALS
3 Meals pr. day $6.8# pr.wk.
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
heAnn Arbor savings a
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, $4,750,000.00
Northwest Corner Main & Huron
707 North Universiy Avenue

We Save Your Clothes By Taking Pains
'pwnvvt SWAN Mtt

We Wash
Int t
Sof twater

L.:9 C: T V 11.PLA A.L L'
ens, and do
Reasonable
Mending

CALL 165
ONE DAY SERVICE ON REQUEST
WhiteSwan Laundry Company
x Detroit and Catherine Streets

T

218 S. MAIN ST.
Confectionery
Lunches
When downtown stop
in and cool off.
STUDENTS LUNCH
409 E. JEFFERSON.
OPEN T AlM TILl 11 P.M

111111111 111[1111[ff1 I II I I lIlIII III 111 1111 1lI1 1 1 111u1
.:w Can ~everyone, make
chocolate soda? Yes
but not thkeki.nl
served at the,
---
kHES
M / n :.
17
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""""""" " " """""""" """ """" """"'1[I[111[118III111[111111111

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1

CONVEN TIONS

conventions, by which people govern their
conduct, are surely strange things. As rigid
flexible as they seem,.they are always chang-'.
id new rules of behavior slowly take the place
1 ones. What a few years before would be
ered an evil act becomes a social custom, and,
e even that passed into the class of forbidden
res.
re seem to be two classes of people, one for-
olding back, the other ever pushing forward.,
;e as it may seem, the group, which at one time
servative, often becomes the radical element
future, and vice versa. 'This is especially true
at world movements, but it is more interesting
e the changes in ordinary conventions, the
of life.
use of cosmetics in one age is forbidden in
xt, and comes into popularity again in a third
Dancing was considered a lure of the devil
Puritans; in some countries it was part of.
us ceremony. And so it goes throughout the
behavior of one kind is conventional in one
conventional in the next.
aps no more striking evidence of the world's
ag ideals can be found in the growing popu-'
f bobbed hair on the part of the girls. A few.
ago only the more worldly type of 1women

ALWAYS
READY

LADIES
INVITED

/, A

I'

ENER.GINE ODORLESS CLEANING
Kindly notice how much longer our Energine Cleaning
stays clean over any other cleaning you have had.

713 E. University Avenue
develops films
and
MAKES PRINTS
with care

11

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W

11

ComApAny
REPAIRING

lid
zo
til

I

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River

209 S. 4TH AVE.-ANN ARBOR-PHONE

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