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July 24, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-24

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BELOW3p
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ppin uiwvrinr

AT YOUR
THREE T

A WEEK

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 24, 1920

PRICE FIVE

Comnmittee Hunts
For Wall Coach
Considering a number of men as a
possible baseball coach to succeed
Carl Lundgren, the Board in Control
of Athletics met at a dinner last night
in the Union. The qualifications of
several prominent baseball men were
gone over, and negotiations are now
being carried on to find a man for the
position left vacant by Lundgren.
It is not probable that a successor
will be secured for a couple of weeks,
because of the time required for clos-
ing such a deal, and it may require an
even longer time. However, a man will
be obtained by fall, athletic ,officials
believe.
- "You can rest assured," said Di-
rector P. G. Bartelme, "that we will
get a good' man for the place. We
'must have an excellenttman to fill Carl
Lundgren's place, especially since he
has gone to Illinois, a rival school."
-3T
PUTINBA TRP

NEXTlWEEK'S, LECTURES TO BE GIVEN
DL BY FACULTY; MAC KAYE IS EXCEPTION
r,~ nin ra Purchasing Agent of University Opens chance to hear one of the country's
Program Monday Afternoon most popular readers, when Percy
MacKaye will appear. He will give
Lectures for the coming week will the reading, "George Washington."
RP be given almost entirely by members Karpluski Lectures

MORE TALK ABOU'
CHILDREN NEEDE!
SAYS HARTWVE

ItESIGNATION TAKES EFFECT ONI
APPOINTMENT OF.
SUCCESSOR
WILSON OF WASHINGTON
UNIVERSITY COMES HERE

needs of
end-

Mass of Details and Naming
Professors and Instructors
Occupies Regents

ofI

f five hundred
ns of Ann Ar-
nt Marion L.
at a reception
s honor Thurs-
an Union, un-
e Chamber of
ed the towns-
y. In the line
vere President
amber of Coi-
le of the cir-
ad met Presi-
blage went to
e the banquet
e meal Knight
orge Roderick,

Acceptance of the resignation of Dr.
W. B. Hinsdale, for the past 25 years
dean of the Homoeopathic Medical
school, was the main feature of the
Regents' meeting yesterday.
As professor of theory and practice
of medicine and director of the Homeo-

of the faculty, the only outside person
to appear being Percy MacKaye.
The opening lecture of the week will
be given by J. C. Christensen, assistant
secretary and purchasing agent of the
University. He will speak on "Uni-
versity Business Administration" Mon-
day afternoon in the Natural Science
auditorium. That evening the class in
Shakespearean reading will give a
recftal in University hall.
Brumm to Talk
Tuesday afternon Prof. J. R. Brumm
of the journalism _department~wil l dis-
cuss "Newspaper English,", and in the
evening Dr. A. S. Warthin, of the Med-
ical school, will give the weekly medi-
cal lecture.
Prof. A. F. Shull, of the zoology de-
partment, whoseabook apn animal biol-
ogy has created a great amount of in-
terest lately, will speak on "Creatures
of Environment," Wednesday after-
noon.
The School of Music will give a re-
cital Wednesday evening, as usual, in
Rill auditorium. The complete pro-
gram will be given in Tuesday's Wol-
verine.
Prof. J. R. Hayden of the department
of political science, will speak on "The
National Budget" Thursday afternoon.
In the evening the students and peo-
ple of Ann Arbor wifl\be given a

"Teachers' Salaries. and the Cost of
Living" will be the subject of Prof. L.
C. Karpinski's lecture, which will'be
delivered Friday afternoon. The last
number of the week will be a reading
by Ray K. Imamel, of the oratory de-
partment, who will give Shaw's "The
Devil's Disciple."
Saturday the annual trip to Put-in-
Bay will be taken under the direction
of the geology department.
PLEASE!
A number of Wolverine subscrib-
ers have missed their papers, and
upon investigation have found
that someone else had been getting
it after the carrier had delivered
it. Our carriers are placing your
paper on the porch and you should
get it every Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday. If not, phone 960,
and let us know.
If.you are not a subscriber it is
unfair to the owner of the paper
to taketit before he sees it. Be as
generous as he is; return it!
If you have not had an oppor-
tunity to subscribe, please phone
960, and we will put on the sub-
960, and we will put you on the
subscribtion list.

Will Make Study of Caves,
Deposits, and Soil
Island

THAT

WILL AChIEVE VI1
FOR EDUCATION, HE
ASSERTS

Limestone
of

ent Fischer presided as toast-
and he introduced Mayor
Vurster, who officially wel-
'resident Burton and his fam-
e city, saying that already the
t and his family had found a
ace inathe hearts of Ann Ar-
izens, and that h.e should feel
eek their aid and co-operation
interests at all time. , The
also gave a word of apprecia-
r. H. B. Hutchins for his work
ig Ann Arbor's.greatest busi-
emost among its kind in Amer-
ischer then introduced Judge
who presented President Bur-
he latter stated that already
rely believed he had become
usiastic a supporter of Ann
s any of its citizens. He said
h himself anhd Mrs. Burton had
npletely won by the spirit that
I here and by the beautiful
nd gardenlike scenery.
reeessities of the Hour"
illest development of th'e Uni-
and theme advancement of the
end primarily upon a com-
-operation and understanding
the two, according~ to the
t, and in order that a start
e made at the meeting in that
s he said that he would speak
things which he believed vi-
portant to a realization of
erstanding, under the title of
tles of the Hour."
rst necessity that he spoke of
icism. "Criticism has a very
it position in, our life today.
ant response of a community
s that it believes wrong is a
portant thing. Used in such
r, it serves as a social check
excesses and extremes, points
cts, and fortifies our institu-
t is also a spur to greater ef-
But only the right kind of
a is able to do these things,
should be careful to see that
cism is based on a full knowl-
the facts, that all trivialities
arded, and that the criticism
without any prejudice.
'erica Needs Friendship
dship also is a prime neces-
life, and it is the one thing
is needing today. Without
endship there can be no real
.tion. Such friendship can be
. only by personal contact or
, yet with a strong independ-
thought. Friendship also in-
he ability to give and to take.
either, a real bond cannot be
between two perso'ns.
supreme . nece~sity of life is
- Religion is not a supersti-
ling; it is not something that
go to in the dark to explain
stake or inconsistency of life;
need it be unscientific. Reli-
true friendship with God. It
t its best, and is the foremost

EXCURSION WILL INCLUDE 120
MILE RIVER AND BOAT RIDE
The annual Summer session excur-
sion to Put-in-Bay, under the direction
of Prof. I. D. Scott and Mr. F. W.
Frostic, of the geology department,
will be held next Saturday, July 31.
Included in the trip will be a 120-mile
river and lake boat ride, geographical
studies of the Detroit river industries,
and a study of the caves,limestone
deposits and soils of the island from
the standpoint of physiography.
To Make Complete Study
Leaving Ann Arbor on the D. U. R..
at 6:10, or on the Michigan Central at
6:37 Saturday morning, the party will
take the steamer Put-in-Bay, which
sails from the foot of First street at
9:00' a. m. Four hours to be spent on
the island will be devoted to considera-
tion of the summer resort possibilities
of Put-in-Bay, the vine industry, and
he response of vegetation of the island
to climate and soils. The caves, lime-
stone deposits, shore lines, glacial
action, and soils will be studied,
Expenses of the trip need not exceed
$4. No paid reservations will be made.
Students wishing to make the trip
should notify Professor Scott or Mr.
Frostic. About 100 persons made the
trip last year.

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

DI. W. B. HINSDALE
pathic hospital, Dean Hinsdale has
done a great service for the University.
Ike is known throughout the country
as one of the best heart specialists.
Resolutions were -passed by the Re-
gents in recognition of his work in
Michigan.
Dean Hinsdale's resignation will be-
come effective as soon as a successor
is appointed. He is 69 years old.
Confirmation of appointments and,a
mass of detail work occupied the board
at its meeting, little work of! great iri-
portance being done. Succeeding Dr.
Leslie Bosford, resigned, Dr. John
Sherrick was appointed assistant pro-
fessor of gynecology and obstetrics in
the Medical school.
Dr. Frank Wilson, who comes from
Washington university at St. Louis, was
named associate professor of internal
medicine. An extension of a year on
his leave of absence will enable Prof.'
F. B. Merrick, of the engineering col-
lege, to complete engineering work in
China, which he has undertaken for the
Chinese government.
In order that he might assist govern-
ment engineers in the Philippines in
the study of river and flood conditions
there, Prof. Hugh Brodie, of the engi-
neering faculty, was granted a two-
year leave of absence.
(Continued from Page 1)
REIMANN WIL L BE
YdM.C. A.SECRETARY
Lewis Reimann, former student and
member of the Varsity football squad
of the University, has been appointed
Presbyterian student secretary on the
University Students' Christian Asso}
ciation staff.
Mr. Reimann is at present secretary
of the city Y. M. C. A. and is alsov con-
nected with the organization at Ypsi-
lanti. His resignation has been ac-
cepted and will take effect September
1, when his new duties at Lane Hall
will begin.
Mr. Reimann will also act as secre-
tary for general Y. M. C. A. extensi n
work throughout the state. He will
organize and train students to speak
at meetings, dinners and wherev'r
speakers are needed on "Y" work and
"Y" problems. While in school Mr.
Reimann was deeply interested in Y.
M. C. 'A. extension .ervice.

3MANY SIGNIFY
ENTERING
THE

INTENTION
SCHOOL IN
FALL

July 26
5 p. m.-University Business Adminis-
tration. Mr. J. C. Christensen.
8 p. m.-Recital. The Class in Shake,-
spearean Reading. (University Hall.)
July 27
5 p. m.-Newspaper English. Prof. J.
L. Brumm.
8 p. m.-Medical Lecture. Prof. A! .
Warthin.
July 28
5 p. m.-Creatures of Environment (il-
lustrated). 'Prof. A..F. Shull.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music. (Hill Audi-
torium.)
July 29

INDICATIONS POINT TO
REHCORD ENROLLMENTI

OF

Advance registration in the Univer-
sity points to a record of enrollment,
which in all probability will exceed
that of last year, according to reports
from the Registrar's office. The num-
bef of high schqul and preparatory
students who have mailed in their-
credits is unusually large.
The early applications for I rooms
also bears out the above. Already
most of te rooms near the campus
have been reserved for the coming
year and landladies express the opin-
ion that students will be obliged to
go even further from the campus than
last year in search of accommodations.
Other schools also report indications
of a larger enrollment this coming
year than heretofore. The great in-
crease in interest in education is be-
lieved tod be a direct resultof the war,
which has made people unsatisfied to
live without possessing an ability to
know and understand.
FIRST AID CLASS TO BEGIN
ITS SESSIONS NEXT TUESDAY
The class in instruction in first aid
the injured will start at 3:15 next
Tuesday afternoon. The class, which
will be under the instruction of Dr.
May, will meet every Tuesday and
Thursday afternoon in the instructor's
office at Waterman gymnasium.
Special attention will be given to
the injuries occurring on the football
field and in the gymnasium. The class
is open to any student of the Summer
session wishing to enroll.
3IORE THAN FIFTY FOREIGN
STUDENTS ATTEND PARTY
More than 50 foreign students of the
University ummer session attended the
"Get Together" party at Lane hall last
evening. The affair was arranged by
the friendly relations committee of the
Y. Games of various sorts were played
and refreshments served. A game
called "Who's It?" was played.

ANSSGIRL DROWNS
AT WHITMORE LAKE1
WEAK HEART PREVENTS HER
FROM REACHINGI
-SHORE
Frances Wesfcott, 21 years of age,
whose home was at Galena, Kan.,
drowned yesterday afternoon at Whit-
more Lake. Diving into 20 feet of
water, Miss Wescott, who is said to
have been a strong swimmer, started
back to shore, but a weak heart pre-
vented her from reaching land and she
sank before help could come.
Her mother was aniong those on the
shore, who watched the efforts to save
and rescue the body. For some time
the lake bottom was dragged for the
body, and only after an hour was it
recovered.
Accompanied by her mother, Miss
Wescott, who is a student at the' Uni-
versity of Kansas, had attended a so-
rority convention in Michigan, and en.
route home,, they had stopped to visit
with Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Burt at
Whitmore.
DETROIT PARTY TO VISIT,
OBSERVATORY THIS EVENING
Last evening about 300 summer
school students were shown through
the obervatory. This was the last
night for visitors from the student
body. There will be a party of about
50 from Detreid to see the apparatus
and equipment tonight.
LEAGUE ENTERTAINS WOMEN
STUDENTS THURSDAY AT TEA

DEMOCRACY REQUIRES
EFFICIENT SCHOOL
Problem of. Housing Has Not Be
Properly Met, Superintendent
of Buffalo Asserts
"Get people to tak- more about chi
dren and less about dollars and cen
and you have achieved a great victc
for education. We talk of .the va
sum's of money poured out for pub
education in this country. Yet v
have fallen far short of the princip
that if we are to have an efficie
democracy, we must have efficeiE
schools, ' asserted E. C. Hartwell,
perintendent of the Buffalo pub
schools, in his discussion of scho
building programs given in the M
tural Science auditorium yesterday a
ternoon.
Can Be Proud
"We can be proud of what has be
done for education,". heacontinue
"There is also much that would r
furnish material for a Fourth of Ju
celebration. Our greatest strengl
during the war was the. young peop
in educational systems. Germany wi
her supposedly efficient spy syst4
thought America, could not create
good army, forgetting that there a
more people in the high schools of t
UJnited States that in any other counit
of the world."
Charging that the problem of hou
ing schools has not been properly M
Mr. Hartwell said that "not a sing
large city in the country has faciliti
sufficient for its needs. This is par
due to the rapid growth of cities, a
.to the facethat in many cases mon
went for other causes than education
needs. Cities are away behind inir
viding space. Smaller cities share t
same condition to a more or less d
gree.
Buildings Unfit
"Children are going to buildin
totally unfit for school use. It is ea
to excite public sympathy for tube
cular or physically deficient childre
but the regular, normal children-95
of the school population-are pe
mitted to go their own, way.
In almost every city there a
school buildings of what may be call
the James Buchanan style of archite
ture-buildings that have been patche
added to and remodeled. Such bui
Jugs have poor ventilation, bad lig
Sand are difficult to hreat."
Mr. Hartwell discussed the metho
he has found most effective for seci
lng the adoption of a building plan
his experience'as an administrator
schools in.Buffalo and other citi
"The problem is about as difficult
a large city as in a small city,"
said.
Must Make Survey

5
8

p. m.-The Problem of the National
Budget. Assistant Prof. J. R. Hay-
den.
p. m.-Author's Reading. Mr. Percy
MacKaye.
July 30

Women students of the Summer ses-
sion were entertained by the Women's
League at tea Thursday afternoon at
the Kappa Alpha Theta house. Piano
selections were given by Ruby Christo-
pherson and Beatrice Milley.
League to Give Picnic For Women
Women students of the Summer ses-
sion are invited by the Women's
League to a picnic Thursday afternoon
at the Island. Picnicers are to bring
their own lunch, and a cup for coffee.
The start will be made from Barbour
gymnasium at 4:30 o'clock.

5 p. m.-Teachers' Salaries and the
Cost of Living. Prof. L. . Karpinski.
,8 p. m.-Reading, Shaw's "The Devil's
Disciple." Mr. R. K. Immel. (Uni-
versity Hall.)

"Before you do anything success
ly, you must know just what it is
want to sell the public. A careful
intelligent survey of the local si
tion must be made. Then see to it
the board of education is in hary
with your plan before you apprc
the public. It is difficult to se
public endorsement when your b
of education is not supporting
If necessary it'is better to compro:
your program somewhat in orde
get the board behindl you.
"Then take the people into your c
plete confidence. , They will suppo
plan if it is sound and practical.
noculate the public with the idea
they should do more for the sc
children. Don't point the situation
black-it is usually black enough-
tell them how many children are g
only part time becauseof lack of r
and how manry are taught in dark
unsanitary rooms. The press ma;
helpful or injurious to your plan,
it does not dominate the situation
"Your so-called temporary quar
are most expensive in the long ru:
is a false idea of economy to crowi
many children as a room will
under the direction of one teacher.
teacher should have more thar
pupils, and it is better to have f
than, that," he concluded.

h

OPEN AIR

0AMPUS SERVICE

SUNDAY 7:30 P. M.

SPEAKER: Rev. Arthur W. Stalker

t

ON THE LIBRAR'Y STEPS

IF RAIN, IN LANE HALL

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