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July 22, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-22

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Editorial Comment

ENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.

t [

iblished Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday Afternoons.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press. Building, Maynard Street. -
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 244.'
OFFICE .HOURS:
30 to 12:oo Daily; 1:30 to 5:oo Daily, except Saturday.
munications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signatures
cessarily to be published in print, but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be published in The Wolverine,
discretion of the Editor, if left or mailed to the office.
gned communications will receive no consideration. No
ript will be returned unless the writer encloses postage.
Wolverine does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
in the communications.
NTON W. SARGENT, Jr.............Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 120.
ON F. HILLERY...................Business Manager
Phone 96o or 2738.

BUSINESS ASSISTANTS
n John J. Hamel, Jr.

Robert L. Kersey

Riley

ISSUE EDITORS
Hamilton Cochran

COLUMN EDITO"
Howard Weeks
I5
THURSDAY, JULY 22, 1920
aMICHIGAN WANTS THE BEST
rith growing boys and girls of high school age,
common to find an unusually strong admiration
attachment for their teachers. These young
le come to their instructors for advice and
t to heart talks after the hours of school are
The troubles and problems of the day are
issed, and the t'eacher in a truly sympathetic
noble manner helps them out of their difficul-
Through this exchange of confidences there
lops a great friendship, and the teacher comes
cercise a great influence over the youths.
. the Muchigan Summer session there are a large
ber of teachers, many of whom undoubtedly act
-mfessors and advisors to their pupils. At the
exnt time, they are students of this great Univer-
but unfortunately they do not come in contact
all phases of Michigan life in the summer. As
ents primarily, they must realize the academic
tness "f Michigan and the supreme position it
n this field. However, the other activities of the
versity, which form a real bond for all Michigan
ents, are not all functioning. True, the Union,
pot light, and a few of the clubs are keeping up
societies are now suspended. Before forming a
opinion Ofthe University,e hope thatethey
Hier all the activities of the school. If they do
hey can hardly help but feel the Michigan spirit,
.h sends out its loyal alumni, ever working for
alma mater.
hen'these teachers leave this summer to return
heir schools, we hope that they will work for
higan. It is their duty and obligation, in return
what the University has given them. They have
>ower to do great: things for Michigan; it only
ains for thetn to use it.
. the high schools now,.are the young men and
ten, who are to make the University students of
future, an it it is tomaintain its reputation,
htiga muth ave its share of the best of these.
we want only the best, for on these youths in
schodl now will fall'the honor of keeping clean
at name. Some of them may now be wavering
eir choice of a university, others will be think-
about it, and most of them will come to their
rite teacher for advice. If the teachers at the
mer session have assimilated any particle of the
uigan spirit, they will use their influence in
ing their best pupils to Michigan.
WANTED-SOME FACTS
though the two presidential nominees have not
een officially notified of their selection, both of
have already begun campaign speeches, and in
first addresses, they have made various com-
s upon political conditions. Questions have been
I each other; they have spoken of the League
ations; both men unite in trying to do some-
'for Women's suffrage, and they admit that the
of living is too high. Things must be done,
say, but as far as we can see, neither one of the
:andidates has really committed himself on any-
Each thought that has been uttered could be
rued in two different ways.
course this obscurity may be a part of the
ninaries, but the time is soon coming when it
>e necessary to get down to facts. It is now a
r of a little more than three months until the
on, and before that date, the people of the
:ry should know something definite about each
date's views. So far it is a question of guess--
'here each candidate stands. In the Republican
such widely different men as Taft and John-
eel that Harding and their platform represent
views; in the Democratic party the group for
eague with reservations and the group for the
ant as first written, feel that Cox is the man to
the thing each desires. One' group of both
s should be disappointed,-at least this con-

I camouflage should be discontinued, so that
eople of the country may know what to expect
each party. It's high time that-the two candi-
state something specific that they will or will

SHALLOW MYSTERIES
When college students took the places of striking
railroad men the ease with which they mastered
strange duties drew attention to an industrial fact
that always is overlooked until an emergency dangles
it before our eyes. Soft handed lads, who scarcely
knew the difference between a drawbar and a fish-
plate, readily absorbed many of the fundamentals of
railroad operation, and more than a few, after a
week of practice .and instruction, were able to fire
locomotives with reasonable efficiency.
Specialists of all sorts like us to believe that their
crafts are so difficult to learn, except with years of
practice, that we must either employ them upon their
own terms or go unserved. We are apt to accept
this belief ; yet when circumstances throw us upon
our own unaided resources we usually find that the
mysteries of many common trades are not nearly so
intricate as their practitioners have led us to sup-
pose.
The high cost of plumbing has made many a
thrifty housewife take a new and personal interest in
her household water works; and thousands of such
practical women, with no more formidable tools
than a tack hammer, a hairpin, and a screw driver
out of the sewing machine drawer, have taught
themselves to put on spigot washers bought at the
10-cent store and to adjust balky float valves quite
as well as the usual doer of such jobs and his young
helper. The same good wives keep a few fuse plugs
in a pantry drawer; and when the lights go out they
do not call in an electrician. Neither do they send
for a plasterer when a tile comes off the bathroom
wall. They have learned that 5 cents' worth of
plaster of Paris and 'An old caseknife will anchor
that loose tile just a little more firmly than the Rock
of Gibraltar.
If these random examples have any significance
at all they hint that most of us are not nearly so in-,
dispensable to our communities as we suppose our-
selves to be. If we will not do our work on fair
terms some one else will. We .may cause inconveni-
ence or even suffering by quitting in a body without
notice, but in the long run there always will be some
one to do the world's work. When trained men lay
down their tools amateurs will pick them up, and in
time they will learn to use them just as effectively.-
Saturday evening P'ost.
Governor Cox may be sincere in telling the wom-
en that he doesn't want their votes as pay for swing-
ing Tennessee into the suffrage column, but we'll,
wager he isn't very keen about their voting for
Harmiing.3
This fe low La Follette will soon have the record
for belonging to parties. He's already looked in at
three of them, and the latest is that he's thinking of,
joining another.
It's going to be a source of regret and hurt to one,
of the presidential candidates that he was unable to
carry his home state.

HANDY INFORMATION FOR
ANN ARBOR TRAVELERS
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Timhe)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-0:10 a.
m. and liourly to 9:10 p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9;4$ a. mn., and every two hours
to 9:48 p. in.
Local Cars, East Bound-5:55 a. m., 7:00
a. ". and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.;
p. mn. To Ypsilanti only: 11:40 p. rn., 122:3
a. mn., 1:10 a. mn.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound-7:50 a. m. 12:40
a. m.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars,
8:48, 10:48 a. mn.,12:48, 2:48, 4:48 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansihg-Limnited car, 8:48
P. in.
HALLER & FULLER
JEWELERS
State Street
Ma Failings,
714 Monroe St. (Next to Cutting)
NICE HOME COOKED MEALS
3 Meals pr. day $6.60 pr.wk.
T I
218 . MAN ST

ItfIIlil it llls n i lllllIMIn I 111i IIil ltfttini n n li1t1111
Can everyone make
chocolate soda? Y
but not the kii
served at the
{~rE
wwiw
rniiiinnninnniuuiinninu

Slide Rules in Leather Ca

Ll

$11.60

A GOdD SUPPLY at

WA HR SooKS

es,
nd

r
7
237

Confectionery
Lunches

I When downtown stop
in and cdoioft.
Typewriters of all makes rent-
ed, sold, bought, exchanged.
TYPEWRITING DONE
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
STATE ani WILLIAM

1

I

I

KEEP

COOL

We are HEADQUARTERS for Summer Goods
PURITAN OIL COOKERS CAMP GRIDS
PICNIC OUTFITS IN
PAPER PLATES, SPOONS, NAPKINS, SPREADS
FISHING TACKLE . THERMOS BOTTLES

BURGESS AND EVER-READY
FLASHLIGHTS AND BATTERIES

I

I

1

STUDENTS LUNCH
409 E. JEFFERSON
OPEN 71 AM TILL 11 P.M.

RUBBER
GRASS S:

HOSE,
H E A R S,

SICKLES AND
LAWN MOWERS

Make a Guess on the Ever-Ready Daylo Contest!

ALWAYS
READY

Abaft the News
These few excerpts from the Quadrangle book of
1905 might prove interesting to the students of the
Summer session as they were written by a professor
who is now teaching somewhere in Michigan.
STRAINS FORM THE "CORPUS INSCRIP-
TIONUM LATINARUM"
VoL. VI. No. 18131
My name was Bilious Ike,
I've hiked the dusty pike
With booze and beers
For three score years,
The same old Bilious Ike.
And now I've passed my check,
No more I'll stack a deck;
I lost my game
When summons came
Towards Hades' gloom to trek.
Stay, mourn my thirsty soul,
Turn down the flowing bowl,
Forever dry,
For here I lie
Save for a passer's dole.
Bedew, my friend, the ground,
Bedew this darn-old mound ;
A drop does tell'
When you're in hell,
And feel the flames around.
MORE TRANSLATIONS BY PROFESSOR
VoL. IV. No. 1824.
Ho there ! You lover, I say,
You seen old Venus today?
That damned old goddess of love?
She's pierced my joint
With an arrow's point,
And I'm wild as .hell with love.

LADIES
INVITED

M. D. LARNED

I' .

STATE STREET HARDWARE
310 S. State

I

Phone 1610

SWAIN'
7 3 E. University Avenue
develops films
and
MAKES PRINTS
with care

'

I

III

p

]II I

THE ALLY OF EVERY,. OTHER SPORT -
-KODAK-'
FOR KODAK AMATEURS THIS STORE IS G. H.
Cameras, Photographic 'Helps and Conveniences
that make Picture Making all the Easier,-Film
and Paper
EVERYTHING'S HERE
LYNDON AND COMPANY
719 NORTH UNIVERSITY

P. -

Box Lunches at
-W
SDelicatoasn
a -
1191. Liberty St.
Phone 262GM
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, $4,750,000.00
Northwest Corner Main & Huron
707 North Universly Avenue

4 j
FOR. TRAVELING, ANYWHERE, ANY TIME
You Will Enjoy Using the
A.B.A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50, and $100, and are
cashed by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identifica-
tion.
n-ASK US-
FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK
101-105 South Main Street 330 South State Street
(Nickels Arcade)
lac$ or P iclareple

4

I

L

.omol!

NAIAD

.:

I'm loaded and laying for game,,
The goddess of love is that same,
Just wait until she heaves into sight!
This club's one crash-
She'll wrestle her hash
In the borders of hell tonight.

Nickels Arcade

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River

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