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July 22, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-22

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I

oetw

Ulnhrrizw

AT YOUR DOOR
THREE TIMES

I

A WEEK

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 22, 1920

PRICE VIVE Cl

PRIE FVE

MICHIGAN OBSERVATORY IS ONE OF
OLDEST AND BEST EQUIPPED IN WORLD,

i

T FOR
LE T AM
iN BRINVINQ

The second night for allowing vis-
itors to see the observatory is sched-
uled. for this evening. As previOu.3y
announced, persons will be taken
through in three squads of 50 persons,
beginning at 8:30 o'clock, weather
permitting.
The Michigan observatory is one of
the oldest and best equipped of any
college in the country. Harvard is the
only university with a larger tele-
scope, and there are only six larger
telescopes in the world in use.

NTED
ALIFY

versity and the other at Mt. Wilson.
There is a 48-inch one at Melbourne
and another of the same size at Paris.
The Lowell, Ariz., observatory has a
40-inch telescope, and a 60-inch one
is being constructed at Cordova in
South 'America.
Important Work Done
One of the important scientific
works done by the local station is the
discovery of 22 asteroids in Professor
Watson's time. The results of inves-
tigations that have from time to time
been made here have added consider-
able to the knowledge of astronomy.
Of these, the spectre work of various
stars has been said by a Howland, as-
tronomer to be the most notable
achievement in astronomy in recent
years. Many minor investigations
have also been made.
The University observatory has full
equipment for spectre work, including
the measuring instruments. It also
possesses a seismograph for recording

RECEPTION AND BANQUET
S E 6:15 THIS
BE AENING

TOI

BUSINESS MEN Of
CITY TO WELCOME
SPRESIDENT BURTON

Enter National
p Perry in I

men who are trying out
n the rifle team that will
e state of Michigan in the
e matches to be held at
near Cedar Point, O., in
being brought into shape
rection of Prof. C. E. Wil-
Engineering college.
as been held two or three
reek for the last six weeks
range two miles south of
Scores have been kept
the secretary of the State
tion, and it is assured that
iversity men will win
ie team which will con-
.tional honors at Camp
uld Call Wilson
ve more men are wanted
r the event. There is still
e for enough practice to
:spective tryouts should
immediately with Pro-
n, room 339, Engineering
one 2003-R or University

Established in 1852
The observatory here was first es-
tablished in 1852, haling as equipment
a sideral clock, meridian circle, and a
12-inch refracting telescope. D.
Francis Brunnow was the first direc-
tor. He came from Berlin to take
charge in 1854, and remained until
1863.
He was sucpeeded by Prof. J. C.
Watson, who was director until 1879.
Prof. M. W. Harrington then took
charge for 12 years, beingsuperseded
in 1892 by Asa Paul, Jr., who remained
until 1905, when the present director,
Prof. R. C. Hussey, came.
16-Inch Telescope Provided
A 16-inch telescope was provided in
1880 for instruction. The 37-inch re-
flecting telescope and the addition to
the observatory were completed in
1911. This telescope has been used
almost exclusively for stellar spectro-
scopic work, and at the time of its
completion there were only two larger
ones in the world.
Now it is principally an instrument
of research. In 1911 the construction
of a 24-inch refracting telescope was
begun, but has not been completed on,
account of the impossibility of secur-
ing the proper glass for the objective.1
Glass-makers have not scceeded in,
making a suitable glass so far.c
Mt. Wilson Has Largest One
'The largest telescope in the world
is one having a 100-inch aperture, and
is located at Mt. Wilson, California.
The Canadian observatory at Victoria
possesses the next in size, it having:
one of 72 inches. There are two 60-
inch telescopes, one at Harvard uni-

LARGE TICKET SALE
FOR EVENT REPORTED
Two Musical Numbers, Address of
Welcome, and Speech by Presi-
dent Comprise Program
The business and professional men
of Ann Arbor in behalf of the city will
formally extend a welcome to Presi-
dent Marion L. Burton of the Univer-
sity, at a- reception and banquet to be
held this evening at the .Michigan
Union.

CHIEFS WILL LET
WORKERS DECIDE
Chicago, July 21.-Submissionbof the
$600,000,000 rail wage award to a ref-
erendum vote by the 1,800,000 railroad
workers, without recommendation
fr m the? union leaders either for its
acceptanbe or rejection, appeared
probable tonight.
This was the opinion in labor circles
following rejection by the United
States)railway labor board of a peti-
tion for a rehearing of the case.
Three courses were open to the
union chiefs:
First, submission without recom-
mendation; second, recommendation
that the -award be accepted; and third;
that it be rejected.
The more conservative counsel in
the union ranks steadfastly has op-
posed outright rejection of the labor
board's decision. T1e door to recom-
mendation of adoption apparently was'
closed today, leaders of the rail work-
ers intimated, when they requested
the case be reopened, and the board
refused to accede.

SPOTLIGHT SHOW
1TO COME OFF AT
EIGHT ACTS OF VAUDEVIL
EXPECTED TO BE BEST
PRESENTED
BANJO PLAYER FIRST
NUMBER ON PROGRA
All-Campus Orchestra, With DI
Rhodes as Director, Will Con-
clude Summer Performance

earthquakes. According to Secretary R. 0. Boni-
steel, of the Chamber of Commerce,
the full allotment of 500 tickets has
practically been sold. This is the
largest sale ever reported for a ban-
quet of the business and professional,
men. The tickets went rapidly as soon
as put on sale.
The first of the program is a recep-
Two Days of Summer Session Progranms tion for the president in the lobby of
Will be Given Over to Topics the Union, beginning at 6:15 o'clock.
of Wide Interest The serving of the banquet in the main
.dining hall will begin about 6:30
is ATTx Z~m 'DT A iv AVm I w ruTr ; o'clock.

The Union Summer Spotlight vaud
ville, made up entirely of Summer se
sion talent, will take place at 8:
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium. T
program of eight acts promises to
one of the best that has ever been pr
sented by University students, accor
ing to the executive comittee.
An original banjo act by Geor,
Chute, '22E, will be followed by
quartette featuring Tom Underwoc
Jones,- Keena, and Riggs. All the
men have taken part in the Varsi
Glee club, and in former Michigi
operas. Kemp Keena will appear aga
in another act when he will sing s
lections from operas of former years

LN~~VVAAX'INMET ACID T1HKEE
LECTURES ARE SCHEDULED
All periods on Thursday and Friday,
Aug. 5 and 6, on the program of enter-
tainments will be given over to lec-
tures and entertainments of interest
to cosmopolitan students. This was
done because of ithe large number cif
foreign students in attendance and
because of the importance of intern,-
tionalisin 'In the world today.

eam will consist of 18
r there eight University
hr there were eight Uni-
the team. The national
held from August 1 to
he first two weeks being
ractice. By special per-
been arranged for the
n who qualify for the
get their preliminary-
and to report at Camp
e close of the Summer
es will be held from
The National Rifle as-
matches are scheduled
to 20, and the govern-
tches for: the national
will be held from Aug.
n expenses to and from
nd subsistence during
e furnished by the gov-
meet is endorsed by the
rar, and many regular
re to attend.
en who are trying out
more, James Glunt, J.
ter Simpson, R. Moore,
.rof. Wilson will be in
state team during the
also president of the
Rifle association, which
h the National Rifle as-
Places Fourteenth
nal matches held last
LI, N. J., the state team
th among the 77 teams,
place in the class ex-
onal teams This was
y Michigan team ever
meet were teams from
the Union, the Philip-
and Porto Rico, the
)rps, cavalry, coast ar-
illery, infantry, and the
editionary forces, and
Lard. The Marine corps
place.
made to have a team
e University this year,
quipment were not re-
Lieut. Col. J. P. Lucas,
litary science and tac-
d rifles, and an effort
to enroll a University

KAZOO CLUB TO HEAR
TWO PRESIDENTS
President Marion L. Burton will de-
liver an address at the banquet of the
Kalamazoo Normal club of the Uni-
versity to be held at 6 o'clock next
Monday evening in the Michigan'
Union. All University students who

7
7

Program Arranged
Such a program as above is also in
accord with maintaining the reputa-
tion of Michigan as the foremost cos-
mopolitan school in the country.
Summer school officials, on account of
these facts, have arranged the follow-
ing program for the above days:
Prof. Robert M. Wenley, of the phi-
losophy department, will lecture on
"Nationalism" at 5,o'clock Thursday
afternoon. Friday afternoon at the
same hour there will be a lecture in
Spanish. Thursday evening, Dr. L. ,C.
Douglas will speak on "The New Re-

Two musical numbers by George
Roderick, 21E, and Knight Mirrielees,
'21E, the introduction by President
John C. Fischer, of the Chamber of
Commerce, of Mayor Ernst Wurster,r
who will welcome the president, and
the response by the president, will
comprise the remainder of the pro-
gram.
FOUNDRERS RESPONSIBLE
FO GREAT9 MICHIGAN
EX-PRESIDENT HUTCHINS.
RETIRED EXECUTIVE TELLS WHY
HE CA E TO UNI-
VERSITY
Credit for the greatness of Michi-
gan was given to Dr. Tappan and the
founders of the University by ex-
President Harry B. Hutchins in an ad-
dress before the Educational club last
night.
"The firm coundation which these
men laid for Michigan resulted in the
great University of today," Dr. Hutch-
ins said. Other work of the various
administrations was described by him.
"Why I Came to Michigan" was the
subject of Dr. Hutchins' talk, and as
he told the story.it was a matter of

BURTON- RETURNS,
FROM COLU ,MBlUS
Syeaks at Large Meeting in Interests
of Educational Drive For
Complete Program -
PRESIDENT BUSY WITH WORK
OF COMING REGENT'S MEETING
President Marion L. Burton returned
f this niorning from Columbus, Ohio,
where he spoke yesterday at a large
meeting in the interests of an educa-
tional drive of that city.
They leave of absence caused by this
trip, together with the organizatjon of
administration business for~ the Re-
gents' meeting tomorrow, has caused
an accumulation of the president's
work.
He is planning a vacation at an early
date so that he will be fresh for under-
taking the real administration of the
University, which will begin with the
start of school in the fall. The pre-
liminary work of getting in touch with
things and organizing them has taken
a great deal of President Burton's
time.
There also have been innumerable
requests for the services of Dr. Burton
as a public speaker, which have re-
quired much of his time.
The address yesterday at Columbus
was given for the purpose of focusing
the attention of the citizens on- the
importance of the full development of
a complete educational program.
BRYAN NOMINATED-
BY DRY FORCES
Lincoln, Neb., July 22.-The prohi-
bition national convention yesterday
adopted a resolution tendering the
party's presidential nomination to W.
J. Bryan, despite a communication
from Mr. Bryan declaring he would.
decline. Only six of the more than 200
delegates opposed the resolution. The
resolution only tenders the nomination
to Bryan and he will not be considered
nominated until he accepts.
The resolution was offered despite
unofficial information that Bryan
would not accept. ,

formerly attended the Kalamazoo Nor- lations of Nations," and Friday even-
mal are invited to be guests at the ing the Cosmopolitan club will put on
banquet. There are about 50 in the a program of stunts and acts such as
Summer session. D. B. Waldo, presi- the "All-Nation Hullabaloo" of the
dent of the Normal, will also speak at regular session.
the banquet. Hildner in Charge
I. Prof. J. A. C. Hildner, of the German

Wallace to Appear
Jean Wallace, 121, who made such
success in the recent senior vaudevill
is to appear with Knight Mirrielee
and George Roderick in a musica
number. They WI1 sing several of th
latest popular songs. A negro comed
skit is the latest feature added to tl
program. Johnson and Barnum ai
slated to appear in this act. A. k
'Coates, who took part in the last con
cert of the University Glee and Man
:dolin clubs, will present an unusua
whistling act.'
Orchestra Closes
An' all-campus orchestra, which t
regarded by the committee as thi
headline act, will close the program
Don Rhodes, as director, will be aide
by two xylophones, two saxaphone
and two pianos. According to campu
musical authorities, this combinatia
is unrivaled in presenting jazz musi
at its best. Richie and Weatherby, tli
duet. that will manipulate the piano
are well known on the campus.
Tickets at 50 cents are still obtair
able at Graham's and Wahr's boo
stores,' although they may be bougl
at Hill auditorium when the door
openat 7:45 o'clock this evening.
BUfFALO SUPER INTEN DEN]
WIL L {CTURE FRIDA
FRENCH LECTURE BY PROF. TAL
AMON TO BE AT 6
O'CLOCK
This afternoon students, teacher
and others interested in French wi
have an opportunity to bear a lectur
in French by a Frenchman, Who.sper
the whole period of the war in th
service of his country. Prof. Ren
Talamon, of the French departmen
will give at this time "Les Universite
Prancais."
The Educational motion 'pictures wi:
be shown at 7 o'clock in the Nature
Science auditorium, and at 8 o'cloc
the Union will present its Spotligt
Vaudeville in eight acts. At 8:30 th
observatory will be open to visitors a
it will also be on Friday night.
E C. Hartwell, superintendent of the
public schools of Buffalo, will speak
on "School Building Campaigns" Fri
day afternoon. Inasmuch as Mr. Hart
well found an utterly inadequate and
poorly equipped school system when
he went to Buffalo, and by conducting
a vigorous campaign, in 'which 'h
raised $11,500,000 to put Buffalc
schools on a par with the best in th
(Continued on Page 6)

EVANS, OF CHRISTIAN ASS'N,
LEAVES TO MEET ALUMNI
Thomas S. Evans, of the University
Students' Christian association, leaves
today for Pittsburgh, where he will
confer with a number of the Michigan
alumni regarding the association's
work for next year. After the confer-
ence he will go to Ocean City, New
Jersey, where he will spend several
weeks with his parents.
Rev. Lloyd Wallick, of the Lutheran
church, will have charge of all matters
pertaining to the Union services dur-
ing his absence.

department, is chairman of the com-
mittee on foreign students, and he will

assist the Cosmopolitan club in get- ! change that brought him to the Uni-
ting its program ready. versity. His father, on returning from
a western trip, was delayed in Ann.
REVISED EDITION OF SUMMER Arbor, and while here he becamie ac-
PROGRAM READY TO DISTRIBUTE quainted with the University. Re-
turning to his home in Vermont, he
told his son of Michigahobein
A revised edition of the., lectures, toldahisfsnd ihigasn who ng
entertainments, and concerts of the dissatisfied with the eastern schools,
Summer session are ready for distri-decided to come here. "It was in this
bution in the office of the Summer ses- way that I came to Michigan," said
sion. This is the last revision there President Hutchins.
will be made on the program. All At that time Michigan was noted
changes from now on will be noted in for itsr cosmopolitan student body, and
the regular weekly program. (Continued on Page 6)

AL

COOL CLEAN SWIMS

SPECIAL RATES FOR
SUMMER SCHOOL MEN
$2.00 TO AUGUST 25

AT THE CITY Y. M. C.A.

j , ,' I i

The Michigan Unjo
Present. is Annua
SVMMER SPOTLIGH
__ a - ---' - te.- ..-- -'- -

At HILL AVDIT
8:15 Tickets at D

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