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July 17, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-17

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THE WOLVERINE

-- ,

tbe Wolverine
OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER
SESSION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
Published Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday Afternoons.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
OFFICE HOURS:
8:30 to 12:oo Daily; :3a to s:oo Daily, except Saturday.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signatures
hot necessarily to be published in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Wolverine
at the discretion of the Editor, if left or mailed to the office.
Unsigned commncations will receive no consideration. NoI
manuscript will be returned unless the writer encloses postage.
The Wolverine does not necessarily endorse the sentiments e-
pressed in the communications.
THORNTON W. SARGENT, Jr..............Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 120.
VERNON F. HILLERY.....................Business Manager
Phone 960 or 2738.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS*
Richard C. Chapmn John J. Hamel, Jr. Robert L. Kersey
ISSUE EDITORS
William H. Riley Hamilton Cochran
COLUMN EDITOR
Howard Weeks
SATURDAY, JULY 17, 1920
LITERATURE AND THE NEWSPAPERS
Professor Rankin is probably right in saying that
the American literature of the future can not come
from modern journalism. The thing, which is re-
sponsible for great literature, is the very quality that
is lacking in journalism. If the majority of the
literary masters are to be believed, great works of
literature are the result of hours of work and count-
lessrewritings. Their articles are pushed aside for
a time, then taken up again, and studied to the
minutest detail. When everything within the
writer's power has been done, it is then considered
a finished product. On the other hand, the articles
of journalism are generally written only once, pr-
haps rewritten a time or two, but often this is not
the case. A modern newspaper is published every
24 hours, and everything in it is usually done in a
day, which leaves little time for deep thought and
many rewritings. From the very nature of jour-
nalism it must be seen that it lacks the thing, which
makes literature.
On the other hand, it must be taken into consid-
eration that journalism is really in its infancy. The
.newspapers are just eginning to realize the possi-
bilitiesthat slie in this field. In the past the news
writers were generally castoffs from other fields,
but the time has now come when the reporters and
editors are trained and studied specialists. Greater
emphasis is being laid upon the quality of t he work,
and less and less quantity is being demanded. Ap-
parently the newspapers are realizing that it takes
time and conectrated work to produce good articles.
Even now there are a few papers, which the most
learned readthoroughly and with which they find
little fiault. Is it not possible that the number of
such papers may grow and their quality so improve,
that there will be a time when the newspaper col-
umns contain literature?
THE .VALUE OF RESEARCH
The immediate and widespread recognition of
Professor Shull's new book by the different univer-
sities and colleges of the country emphasizes the
value of research and writing by a university's pro-
fessors. Through their work in these lines, new
thoughts are developed; old beliefs are changed,
and education and knowledge in general are ad-
vanced.. Without this work of the professors, about
the only class of students In the country today, the
world would be much more backward than it is now.
By their research and writing, many of the profes-
sors of the modern universities are playing a large
part in the world's development. Professor Shull's

book is an instance of what the professor has done
in science; during the late war it is said that Pro-
fessor Friday, of our economics department, was the
power behind the secretary of the treasury ; and
Professor Adams, of the economic department, was
financial advisor to the early Chinese republic. They
are only a few of the men of this and other univer-
sities, who have made great contributions recently.
Many more have done wonderful work, and to a
great extent their deeds are little recognized.-
But in a certain measure they are rewarded, at
least those who write text books. Through their
works, the young men dnd women of America are
being educated, and the' knowledge, which they
gained after long hours of thought and research, is
easily given to the future generations, who are thus
enabled to start on a higher plane than their pre-
decessors. These men can have the satisfaction of
knowing that their efforts have resulted in a better
world and a higher knowledge, and that many of
their students, inspired by the good which they have
done, will endeavor to accomplish even greater
things.
Cox should be a little worried about having
Teddy's cousin run with him, after knowing what
happened to the last president, who had a Roose-
velt as a running mate.
We're giving five to one on the proposition that if
Harding's elected president, Roosevelt won't be the
vice-president.

Some people say that the Democratic platform isr
veiled in the language of President Wilson, and
others maintain that Penrose wrote the Republican
band stand, but it seems to us as if both of' them
were written by Greek oracles.
Before Bill Bryan gets through his idea of send-
ing the party platform on a postcard to all the voters,
we want to call his attention to the fact that he
would be wasting money by sending them to the
postmen.
If these Farmer-Labor delegates spent a little
more time on the farm and in the factory, the high
prices they're kicking about might come down.
We figure that the presidential nominee, who can
go through the campaign saying the most and mean-
ing the least, will be elected.
Editorial Comment
AN INTERESTING CONFERENCE
The other day in London a conference was opened
between American and British teachers of English.
What was done has not found its way west over
the cables but the fact that there was such a con-
ference is interesting in itself.
The relation of the two countries to their common
language has had a varied history. There was a
time when America was frankly colonial and took
its standard speech from British authority without
question. Then differences began to grow up and
this country divided into two schools. One bewailed
any sign of independence here and admitted the su-
periority of British English whether it was good or
bad, while the other regarded any departure from
American usage in deference to British custom as
proof of unpatriotic snobbery.
On the other side the preponderant opinion was
that anything which characterized American Eng-
lish must be bad, and many an Englishman who
ought to have known better condemned usages
learned from masters of English style in his own
country because he learned them first from Ameri-
can tongues and pens. More than one word which
Shakespeare knew and used has been laughed at in
England as an Americanism.
Not every Englishman thought American English
bad. Thackeray, a master of English, liked Ameri-
can English as he heard it from the lips of educated
Americans. Dickens, a man of relatively little cul-
ture, was the writer of Thackeray's period who did
most to persuade Englishmen into the belief that
Americans were mostly linguistic barbarians.
As the years have gone by the view that Thack-
eray took has gained ground and while usage con-,
tinues to differ, neither side holds that the usage
of the other .s anything to laugh at or any evidence
of a want of culture. The great masses of English
speaking people, wherever they are, be it Surrey or
Connecticut, depart more or less from the English
of scholars. It is the duty of scholars, wherever
they may be, to determine a standard and hold the
rest of the people to it as nearly as may be.-Detroit
Pree Press.

TRANSLATOR OF PALAMAS'
WORKS VISITS ART EXHIBIT
Prof. A. Phoutrides, of the Univer-
sity of Athens, Greece, visited the
Greek government exhibit in Alumni
Memorial hall yesterday. Professor
Phoutrides was formerly of Harvard
university, and is known as the trans-
lator of the works of Kustes Palamas,
the greatest living Greek poet. Prof.
Phoutrides will not give a lecture in
c(Ttnection with the exhibit, as was
announced some time ago.
DOWRIE, DEAN OF COMLIERCE
AT MINNESOTA, VISITS HERE
Dean George W. Dowrie, of the
School of Commerce at the University
of Minnesota, and formerly a profes-
sor in the department of economics at
the University, visited here Wednes-
day.

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Slide Rules in Leather Case

zAds"k I 1 0 0

A GOOD SUPPLY at

UNiVERSITY
BOOKSTORE



...,


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FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River
HANDY INFORMATION FOR
ANN ARBOR TRAVELERS
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:10 a.
m. and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Jackson Exp~ress Cars (local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
to 9:.48 p. m.
L ocal Cars, East Bound--5:55 a. in., 7:00
a. in. and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.; 11:00
p. in. To Ypsilanti only: 11:40.p. rn., 12:23
a. in., 1:10 a. in.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound=7:50 a. in. 12:40
a. in.'
To Jackson and Kalammazoo--Limitedcars,
9:48, 10:48 a. in., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48 p. m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited car, 8:48
P. in.
TRUBEY'S I
210 S. MAIN ST.

ANN ARBOR HAT CLEANING CO.
625 EAST LIBERTY STREET
ALL KINDS OF HATS CLEANED-LIE NEW
SHOES SINEI)--l0c
THE ALLY OF EVERY OTHER SPORT--
FOR KODAK AMATEURS THIS STORE IS G. H. Q.
Cameras, Photographic Helps and Conveniences
that make Picture Making all the Easier,-Film
and Paper
EVERYTHING'S HERE
LYNDON AND COMPANY
719 NORTH UNIVERSITY

..i Iii 11111111111111111111 i1~l1lI11iil lII11It111111IIl t1 IiiilllI111
ARE YOU ENJOYING
OURMEALS?
If not try o u r Breakfast
Dinners~
A quiet cool place, that you
enjoy-
Reasonable Prices - Service Al La Car
r 'Libe
Qrey hpJa

and
can
rte

Confectionery
Lunches

rty at
ynard

When downtown stop
in and cool off.

, ..

I

CHUBB HOUSE
209 South State

tI

ENERGINE ODORLESS CLEANING
Kindly notice how much longer our Energine Cleaning
stays clean over any other cleaning yqu have had.

OPEN FOR
SUMEMER
S UCMHM EL
"TASTES LIKE HOME"
G. S. CHUBB, PROP.

',0
a1
J

Abaft the News
The sweet y. t. leaned closer to him and looked
into his eyes longingly. "Je t' adore," she mur-
inured. He glanced down at her and answered,
"Go on, shut it yourself."
"SMALL CHILD
CHOCKED TO DEATH"
-Washtenaw Post.
Needless to say, the kid was chock full of some-
thing.
WONDER IF HE DROVE DOWN IN THE
CHARIOT
Ben Hehr and his sister, Cora, were Ann Arbor
visitors Thursday.-Washtenaw Post.
ONE OF THESE HARD PLACES
The Detroit Journal the other day spoke of a dar-
ing robbery that took place at the Grosse Jointe
Country club.
It was Independence Day,
Or rather night.
Two young people were locked
In close embrace.
Suddenly
There was a large explosion,
The flapper looked up
And cried,
"Oh, Henry, is this the Fourth?"
Henry in a comforting tone said,
"No, sweetie, that's the sixth time tonight."
And the night wore on.
A headline in Colliers says, "If Mrs. Harding
Rules the White House." How about the husband
of the family?
WELL KNOWN OCCUPATIONS
Hair net weavers.
Hole - punchers in cheese, sieves and cigarette
holders.
Men who put the pins in laundered shirts.
Dice manufacturers.
Shoe horn forgers.

REPAIRING

C,,
to,
-

I

s

I

STUDENTS LUNCH
409 E. JEFFERSON
OPEN 7 Al TILL 11 P.M,

209 S. 4TH AVE.-ANN ARBOR-PHONE 2508

ALWAYS
READY

LADIES
INVITED

I

.f

YOUNG WOMEN

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Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, $4,750,000.00

Northwest Corner Main & Huron
707 North Universiy Avenue

IL

f'

- -l pltuatm lit1ttltu1 tl1 at11111 t11 tttt1 :a
.Box Lunches at
a -tora
a C-Y iC sati are c
open Slnday 4 to 6 P.M.
119 E. Liberty St.
Phone 2620M
I1a11111E1111111111E111111a11Eilaal 11

Join the
GREAT BELL FAMILY
And Be Happy and Secure
It's heart-breaking to "lose your job."
Telephone Operators are never "laid off" for any reason or at any
season.
It's embarrassing to have to ask for a "raise."
Telephone Operators know that their salary increases will come
at regular, stated periods. They do not even have to ask.
It's disagreeable to have to work n dirty, untidy rooms and on
heavy, unpleasant materials.
Telephone Operators work in pleasant, bright, airy rooms that are
immaculately clean, and at work that is clean and full of changing
interest.
You Can Earn $25
just for going to our Technical'School for two weeks to learn telephone
operating.
Then watch your salary grow.
Dining rooms, meals at cost, sitting rooms, free benefits, eight-
hour day.
Apply for a position as a Student Operator TODAY between 9
a. m. and 5 p. m.
WASHINGTON & MAIN STREETS, IN THE BANK BLDG.
Miss BoWES, CHIEF OPERATOR
MICHIGAN STATE TELEPHONE COMPANY

II

I

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS'' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River

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