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July 17, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

I

HO WERSI

Lw

vrim'

AT YOUR DOOR
THREE TIMES
A WEEK

11

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 1.7, 1920

PRICE FIVE CENT

US MONDAY

IOTS OF
PUBLIC

THEI

WORK

ROUGHLY EQUIPPED1I
R TESTING LIQUIDS
ion Plainaed Due to the High
'yphold Rate Throughout
All Michigan
'actical demonstration of up-to-
ublic health work will be given
y when the new motorized lab-
r of the Michigan department of
parks for the day on the cam-
il. The truck laboratory is go-
'ough Ann Arbor on its tour of
mmer resorts of the state, and
- invitation of the University
ties it will make its first stop
city to enable summer school
is and townspeople to inspect it.
Truck Has Special Body
truck, which is somewhat of an
tion in public health work, has
dally made bodyband is thor-
equipped with laboratory facl-
r the examination of water and
nd the inspection of waste dis-
Its start is being watcled with
deal of interest by other state
of health throughout the coun-
rt sanitation, especially in
an and the neighboring lake
is an, important subject, and
ethod of going after results will
be adopted as soon as it
its feasibility. Assistant Sani-
ngineer Hirn and Assistant.Bac-
gist Mallman are in charge of

NIAGARA PARTY
STUDYING FALLS
The Niagara Falls party, which left
Ann Arbor 95 strong yesterday after-
noon by special interurbans for De-
troit, arrived in Buffalo this morning,
whence they left immediately for the
Falls. Devoting today to the lower
part of Niagara, they made a special
study of the lower rapids, the gorge.
whirlpool, Foster's .Flats, and the
point of the first falls.
Tomorrow will be spent in the re-
gion of the Falls proper, where Goat
Island, the Cave of the Winds, Upper
Rapids, and other points of interest
will be visited. Returning by beat
Sunday evening, the party will arrive
in Ann Arbor at 10:30 o'clock Monday
morning.
19500 LAW RBOOKS
Former President Donates Entire MA-
brary to University; Collected
While Practicingj
CONTAINS MANY VALUABLE
VOLUMES OF STATE REPORTS

TI KETs
WI T

he idea of sending out the"
ory came as a result of the
roid rate in Michigan.

FOR PERFORMANCE
GO ON SALE
MONDAY

lab-
high

SUMMER SHOWTO
CONSIST Of EIGHT
VAUDEVILLE ACTS,

G

Program For Next Week Has More "LACKFUNCTIONIN
Than Usual Number of Attractions
The program of concerts, lectures, Prof. W. B. Ford, of the department
and entertainments for the coming of mathematics, will lecture on fourth !u
week is of an unusually large and dimension Monday afternoon. At 7
o'clock that evening the Women's Edu-
varied nature: Monday there will be tin l l ill m ttH Nen Now-

Michigan Rating High
e tour of the truck is of special
est i view of the recently pub-
d ratings of Michigan as they ap-
ed In the federal census report.
onsin and Minnesota both ranked
d of Michigan in typhoid preven-.
with practically the same basic
:h conditions.
mmissioner R. M. Olin, in speak-
>f this fact, was emphatic in his
ment that conditions must be
ged. "Both from a financial and
alth point of view, it is mpera-
that our rating must be brought
There is no reason why Michigan
ld not be at the head of the list
ealthful conditions. We will be if
ybody gets into the game. The
ratory truck is the answer of the
.igan department of health to that
Lenge."
rector of Laboratories C. C. Young
be in Ann Arbor on Monday, and
give special demonstrations both
ning and afternoon.
NNIS ENTRIES
TO CLOSE TODAY
tries for the Summer session ten-
ournament close at 6 ''clock this
ing. Until that hor students may
up for the meet at the Athletic
e, George Moe's, or the gymna-
t. To date about 19 have entered
singles matches and six the dou-

The Law school of the University
has been presented by Dr. H. B.
Hutchins, Michigan's retired president,
with, his entire law library, which he
collected while a practicing lawyer
and professr in the law school.
The gift includes 1,500 volumes,
among which are the American State
Reports, Michigan Supreme Court Re-
ports, and the New York State Re-
ports, besides many other valuable pa-
Ipers, texts, and reports.
Dean Bates of the Law school, in
announcing the gift yesterday, ex-
pressed in the highest terms his ap-
preciation of the gift and the gen-
erosity of: Dr. Hutchins. "The Law.
school is in.deed Very grateful' for so
magnificent a gift," Dean Bates said,
"and it will be a valable addition to
the law library."
Though the books are in the library,
they haye not been wholly installed
as yet.
Before becoming president of the
University in 1910, Dr. Hutchins was
dean of the Law school, and it was
under his leadership that it grew to
its foremost place among American
law schools. He assumed charge of
it in 1895 and remained so until 1909,
even during the time in which he was
acting president of the University.
The gift of Dr. Hktchins will place
the Michigan library, which embraces
25,000 volumes and is one of the larg-
est in the country, in a high position
among university law libraries.
''SILAS MARNER"
WELL RECEIVED
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister's reading of
"Silas Marner" was well accepted by
the large crowd of summer students
who attended his recital at 8 o'clock
last night in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall.
Interpretation of the different char-
acters in this book is exceptionally
difficult, bt Professor Hollister showed
exceptional power in elocution and de-
livery. His lines were carefully and
clearly read, and masterly at all times,

MORE TRYOUTS BEING
HELD THIS AFTERNOON
Five Numbers, Already Selected, Show
Creat ralent; Keena to Sing
Popular Songs'
Eight, possibly nine acts, will com-
prise the program for the Summer
Spotlight, to be held at 8:15 o'clock
Thursday evening. Tickets at 50 cents
for this performance, go on sale Mon-
day at the 'State street bookstores.
Of the acts five have already been
definitely selected, and tryouts for the
others are being conducted at 4 o'clock
today in room 308 of the Union by
Earl Moore. Considerable talent has
been discovered, according to the com-
mittee, and this production ipromises
to be as good, if not better, than the
regular Spotlight.
Nirrielees in Two
The headliner of the vaudeville will
be a trio, consisting of Knight Mirrie-
lees, '20, George Roderick, '21, and
Jean Wallace, '21. Roderick, acting as
accompanist, will play some original
compositions for the other two, both
f whom have a reputation for song
and fun work.
temp Keena, '20, is another one of
the big attractions, and he will sing
a number of popular songs. While in
the opera this year, he earned a name
as a fint singer.
Tom Underwood, '21, is gathering to-
gether a quartet, which will equal the
one of which he was a member in the
opera. A banjo number is the fourth
on the program, and George Chute
'22E, will play a variety of selections
at this time.
Orchestra Closes
Closing the program will be Don
Rhodes' orchestra, which will prob-
ably have two xylophones, two pianos
and two saxaphottes. Other acts are
being secured, and a dress rehearsal
of the numbers will probably be held
Tuesday or Wednesday night.
More Enter For
Jijilard Tourney
Entries for the two' Union billiard
tournaments will not close until next
Wednesday, and the three cushion
event will start Thursday, according
to the present plans of Rob rt R.
Snodgrass, '23, manager of the t urna-
Sments
Three entered for the straight rail
contest and four signed up for the
three cushion event yesterday. Five
or six more contestants are wanted
for both tournaments. A man may
enter both contests if he wants to try
for the two silver loving cups.
No experts are to be entered in the
tournament, Snodgrass said, so that
there is no need for any one to hold
back for fear there is going to be a
race between professionals. The tour-
nament will be run off during the af-
ternoons, at scratch, with no handi-
caps. Spectators will be welcome to
at tend the contests.

four different numbers, Wednesday
three, Thursday five, and Friday three.
Laboratory Will be Exhibited
One of the most interesting features
of the program probably will be the
exhibit of the laboratory truck of the
Michigan State Board of Health, under
the direction of Dr. C. C. Young. The
truck is being equipped here and will
start on a tour of the health resorts of
the state next week in a campaign
against typhoid. It will be on exhibit
from 10 to 6:30 o'clock Monday, be-
tween the natural Science building and
the Chemistry building.
CITY WILL HONOR
PR'ESIDENT BURTON
Reception and Banquet by City People
to he Given July 22 For
University Head
EXECUTIVE GIVES PROMISE
TO SPEAK AT THE DINNER
President Marion L. Burton, of the
University, will be honored at a ban-
quet and reception to be given by the
business and professional men of the
city on the night of July 22 in the
Michigan Union. -
Arrangements have been made for
500 plates and it is expected that this
number will not be sufficient to take
care of all who will want to meet
President Burton and help welcome
him in the city, so it is urged by the
committeethat everyone who is espe-
cially desirous of attending the ban-
quet secure tickets as soon as possible.
No more than the allotted number
can be sold as the management of the
Union on account of the difficulty in
securing help at this time of the year
can not undertake the serving of a
banquet to a larger number. Tickets
may be secured at the banks for $1, or
from members of the special commit-
tee appointed by the Chamber "of
Commerce.
It is not necessary to be a member
of the Chamber of Commerce in order
to attend. Members of that organiza-
tion may secure reservations up to
Wednesday by sending a check to the
treasurer.
President Burton has agreed to
speak at the banquet and as his ability
in this line is well known, those in
charge expect an unusually interesting
address.
The reception will open at 6:15
o'clock and the banquet will be served
at 6:30.
WOMEVS EDUCATIONAL CLUB
WILL MEET MONDAY EVENING
The Women's Educational club of
the Summer session will meet at 7
o'clock Monday, in Helen Newberry
residence.
President Burton will address the
meeting. Every woman interested iu
the public schools is invited to be
present.

SIMILAR SESSIONS WILL
CONDUCTED EVERY
SUMMER

* '.onai ciuu wiii meet, a ti. e ne
berry residence, when President M. L.
Burton will address them, and at 8
o'clock Miss Helen Grimes, of the De-
partment of Justice at Washington, D.
C., will speak on "The High Cost of
Living."
Medical Lecture Tuesday
Mr. W. B. Arbaugh, secretary of the
Wayne County Educational System,
will talk on "The Wayne County Ex-
periment," Tuesday afternoon. That
evening Dr. C. G. Parnall, superin-
tendent of the University hospital, will
give a medical lecture, "Health Insur-
ance."
Wednesday afternoon the much-talk-
ed of Einstein gravitation theory will
be discussed by Prof. W. F. Colby. In
the evening, as usual, the weekly fac-
ulty concert ofbthe University School
of Music will be given in Hill .audi-
torium. Those appearing are Mrs.
Grace Konold, soprano; Mr. Anthony
Whitmire, violinist; Mr. Earl V. Moore,
organist, and Mrs. ,Maude Okkelberg,
accompanist.
At 8:30 o'clock the first of the vis-
itors' trips through the observary
will be given. Trips will be conducted
Thursday and Friday nights at the
same time. Admission will be by
ticket only, which may be secured by
presenting the treasurer's receipt at
the Summer session office.
Members of the Women's League
and friends will be entertained from
3 to 5 o'clock Thursday afternoon at
the Kappa Alpha Theta house at 1414
Washtenaw avenue.
(Continued on Page 4)
FIRST 1NURSES' ISTITUTE
ENDS SESSIONS FRIDAY

"Agriculture, Domestic Science,
Industrial Courses
Demanded"

and

BE

Sessions of the Michigan State
Nurses' institute ended Friday after-
noon, following which the visiting
nurses were guests of the local nurses
at their Whitmore Lake cottage.
The last of Friday's program was a
discussion on "The Elimination of
Waste," by Prof. J. B. Edmondson.
"Value of Athletic Association Train-
ing in Training Schools" was the talk
by Miss Hartshorn, of the University
of Michigan, and several other in-
formational talks were given before
this.
The meetings were held in the class-
rooms of the University and were con-
ducted in the nature of a seminary, for
the 30 visiting nurses, who are heads
of the educational departments of
nurses' training schools throughout
the state. The main purpose was to
bring forth new problems and to ac-
quaint the visitors with the newest
phases of hospital work.
The week's institute, which was the
first of its kind ever held in the state,
was so successful that it will be re-
peated every summer. The meeting,
was conducted under the auspices of
the educational department of the
nurses' training school of the, Univer-
sity hospital.

MR. E. 0. MARSH, OF .JACKSON,
DISCUSSES INTERMEDIATE
SCHOOLS
ELEMENTARY COURSES
HOPELESSLY CROWDED

"Our present school organization is
not founded on logic. It is a mere his-
torical accident, not diberately and
scientifically planned," declared k. O.
Marsh, superintendent of the Jackson
public schools, in his address on "The
Intermediate School,"'given in the Na-
tural cience auditorium yesterday af-
ternoon. Mr. Marsh outlined the in-
termediate system now in effect in
Jackson, and said it has proven very
effective in holding pupils during the
restlessness they experience between,
12 and 15 years of age.
Lack Definite Function
"Neither the elementary nor high
schools have any definite function un
der our present system," he said. "The
elementary schools should supply the
student with the tools of the mind.
The higher schools should enable him
to find his powers and capabilities.
Between the age of 12 and 15 years
individuality of the pupils must be re-
spected. No man can develop a uni-
form course for all students. The
time to divide the students is at adoles-
cence. Then the memory is active,
although the reasoning power is not
completely developed.
"the elementary curriculum, espe-
cially in the seventh and eighth grades;
is hopelessly overcrowded. The child
is taught so many things he cannot
master any. The days of the three R's
is gone forever. There is a demand
for instruction in agriculture, domestic
science, and industrial courses.
"It is bad for the child to be com-
pelled to repeat I- 'the courses of a
school year just ecause he has failed
in one. Often he revolts at the injus-
tice and drops out of school. The
break between the eighth grade and
high pschoolcomes at the worst time
if the pupils are expeted to stay in
school. When the diplomas for com-
pletion of the grades schools are
handed out, many pupils have the mis-
taken idea that their education has
been completed, and leave before they
have been taught history, literature,
and civics. Thus they are not broad-
ened in the subjects that make for
good citizenship. This is the greatest
problem of the schools today-to hold
children ove4 this restless period.
Schools Do Not Offer Needs
"The children drop their school
work, not because of economic pres-
sure, but because they feel they have
reached the limit of development
along the old lines. They are wearied
by the monotony of the curriculum,
and they feel the. school does not offer
what they need.
"The intermediate school ,As in the
process of making. "It is an inter-
mediate school rather than a junior
high school, standing midw between
the elementary grades on the one side
and th high school and college on the
other. The term junior' high school
gives an idea of subordination to a
senior high school. It s not subordi-
nate. Each has its own ,field."z
fells of Jackson Plan
Mr. Marsh told of the plan iq effect
at Jackson. The seventh and eighth
grades and the first year of high school
were incorporated. in the intermediate
school. Some difficulty was experi-
enced in securing the erection of
buildings suitable for the special needs
(Continued on Page 4

1

OPEN AIR

CAMPUS SERVICE

prize of a dozen tennis balls for
winner of the singles will be
n by George Moe, and other re-
ds to the runner-up in the singles
'he two winners of the doubles
be provided through the entrance
money. If there' Is enough left
r buying suitable things for these
,a prize will probably be offered
runner-up in the doubles.1

SUNDAY 7:30 P. M.

SPEAKER: Rev. Leonard A. Barrett
ON THE LIBRARY STEPS

e

A

i

Tickets on Sale

HILL

A UDIT'ORIUM

at Wahr's,
Graham's

UNION SUMMER SPOTLIGHT VAUDEVILLE
8:15 P. M.
THURSDAY, JULY 22nd

Tickets
50c

id on Campus

i

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