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July 13, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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, STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER
ION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
hed Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday Afternoons.
es: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
OFFICE HOURS:
O 12:00 Daily " 1:3o to 5 :oo Daily, except Saturday.
ications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signatures
arily to be published in print, but as an evidence of
notices of events will be published in The Wolverine
retion of the Editor, if left or mailed to the office.
d communications will receive no consideration; No
will be returned unless the writer encloses postage.
Iverine does not ngecessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
the communications.
ON W. SARGENT, Jr................Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 120.
F. HILLERY.......................Business Manager
Phone 96o or 2738.

what to this unfortunate situation; but its effects are
not as extensive, as we would be led to believe.
And third, this condition may be ascribed largely
to a loss of the true confption of service. This, it
seems, is the root of the evil. Only when men
realize that they must give in proportion as they
take ; and only when they realize that what they give
must be their best-only then will we return to an
era of service and order.

LOG

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FOR RENT

Slide Rules in Leather C

Editorial Comment

BELGIUM RESTORED

An
pleted
offers
when

economic survey of Belgium recently com-
by the British department of overseas trade
convincing evidence of what a nation can do
it sets itself a constructive task. It is an

BUSINESS ASSISTANTS
Chapman John J. Hamel, Jr.

Robert L. Kersey

TUEsDAY, JULY 13, 1920
MICHIGAN'S LOSS-ILLINOIS' GAIN
The loss of Carl Lundgren, who leaves to coach
baseball at Illinois next year, will be a hard blow to
Michigan. In losing him, the University loses an
able coach and a man whom it will be difficult 4o
replace. His knowledge of baseball and his fair,
square playing mark him as a fine man. His won-
derful coaching has brought Michigan teams four
championships in six years of his work, and if he
had remained he would undoubtedly have produced
another champion team next year and many more
in years to come. It is not doubted by many that
he is- the best coach in the Conference, and his
presence at Illinois, Michigan's greatest rival in all
sports, will make things hard for future Michigan
teams.
But he has heeded the call of his alma mater; he
has left to mold the teams of the school for which
he once played and won championships. However
much he liked Michigan-lhis'close friends say that.
it was a great deal, for Illinois has been hard after
him for more than a year-the call of his university
was too much. He could not resist the demand that
was made of him, and he has left his adopted school.
His departure, however, stamps him only as a finer
man, for. he is one in many, who has placed his
university above personal gain. In the next few
years at Michigan, Lundgren would have-had won-
derful championship material with which to work,
but!he refused this chance of almost certain victory
and consequent glory to coach Illinois, which, with
him there, has prospects only a little less bright than
does Michigan.
In securing hi services, Illinois has obtained a
great coach, one who has done much for Michigan
and who will undoubtedly try to do more for Illinois.
In the future when Michigan and Illinois nines
meet, there will be the same keen rivalry that has
characterized the previous contests, but 'there will
always be a grain of satisfaction in case .of our de-
feat-the fact that our former coach produced the
team.'
SERVICE VERSUS DISORDER
Tine was-and not so distant, either-when our
activities could almost be classified under that
broadly inclusive term, "service." We did this, and
we did that; and if the act was not prompted by
selfish motives, it was purely a bit of service.
Orators trumpeted forth their call to serve; and we
were purged in the fire of their enthusiasm. Verily,
thought we, "Service" is the "Open Sesame" to the
gates of heaven. Maybe it was; but "service" is
certainly not descriptive of the present-day attitude,
and the password will need to be changed if some
of us are to gain admittance to the celestial domain.
Perhaps our disregard of service is but one phase
of the reaction through which we are passing. In
fact, so numerous have been its manifestations that
it seems to lie at the hub rather than at the rim of
our damaged social wheel. It is a condition which
has affected industry, commerce, and government.
Industry and government have pretty generally
come in for their share of criticism; their suscepti-
bility to the germs of disorder has proved an in-
destructible target for partisan critics. But com-
merce as distinguished from industry-and espe-
cially the smaller businesses-has not been reviewed
so scathingly, probably because its political signifi-
cance is not so obvious. Nevertheless it is true that
commerce, especially the retail stores, has suffered
equally from this disregard of service.
Enter a department, store. Do you get service?
Perhaps, after the clerks have finished theirdiscus-
sion of the latest divorce suit, one of them may
condescend to wait on you. Try certain of the soft-
drink parlors. Service? It is a thing which has not
yet entered the realm of consciousness. To cite one
instance, we know of two men who, at a dull hour
of the day, waited thirty-five minutes for two glasses
of ginger-ale, a drink which required practically no
preparation, and then left-unserved! And in the
restaurants it ,is not an unusual thing to have the
bread served when the meat and ,vegetables have

become cold.
Now, just what are the causes of this lack of
service? First, tradesmen sometimes enter into
business thinking that service can be developed after
the business becomes established. They fail to rec-
ognize that service is a prerequisite and not a con-
sequence of a successful business.
Second, lack of trained help may contribute some-

example to the world of the value of labor. It re-
futes on a national scale the theories and practices
of apostles of rest and of unrest.
Little Belgium, which practically ceased to exist
as a nation for more than four years, whose man
power was depleted to exhaustion, whose factories
and mines were stripped and made useless, whose
towns were left in ruins, and whose farm lands were
battlefields, has gone far toward complete rehabilita-
tion. Railroad tracks have been almost entirely re-
stored to pre-war, conditions; most of the canals
are working; coal production is almost at pre-war
level; devastated factories are requipped and pro-
ducing; agricultural lands have almost fully recov-
ered. Only an improvement in exchange rates is
believed necessary to speed the country back to com-
plete restoration..
All this has been accomplished by one thing-
work. There has been one purpose supreme in the
Belgian mind. That purpose was restoration. It
overshadowed factional differences, selfish interests,
and jurisdictional disputes. It was the purpose of
men, women, and children to' restore their country.
They recognized that the way to accomplish this
purpose was to work, and they worked. Their pur-
pose is about to be completely accomplished.
if Belgium, racked and ruined by war, could ac-
complish such prodigies, there can be little excuse
for the United States to complain of its railroad
collapse, its tax burden, its building shortage, or its
farm deficiency. So long as we do complain, with
such an example before us, we admit as a nation
that we are not willing to labor for the things we
want.-The Chicago Tribun e.
Abaft the News
"KITTY GORDON SHOOTS
VAUDEVILLE PERFORMER
IN, CHICAGO PLAYHOUSE"
-Head.
Let's hope it was an acrobat !
At last the newspaper editor has come into his
own with two members of the Fourth Estate run-
ning for the office of chief executive.
WHAT THESE SUMMER VISITORS WILL
DO TO ONE
Mrs. Chas. Samson and niece, Mary Elizabeth
Salterburg, of Detroit; spent the day at Jacob Read's
Saturday.1
Jacob Read has been confined to his bed for a few
days. -Washtenaw Post.
"Where did you get the ruby beak, sunburn?"
"No; moonshine."
The fair young thing ran up on the porch all out
of breath and choking back a sob, cried, "Mother,
that man who just moved in across the street walked
up behind me all the way from the corner." The
comforting mother said, "Don't cry, my, dear, I
don't think that he was even looking at you." With
a fresh outburst of tears the daughter made answer,
"That's what I'm crying about, mother, he wasn't."
HANGIN' HIS CLOTHES ON A HICKORY
LIMB AGAIN
Lost-Man's brown coat on road to beach; re-
ward. -Liner.
Summer students and some are not. Also it's a
great life here if you don't week-end.
WHAT DOES IT SAY?
Lost--White German poodle. Answers to the
name of Jessie. -Liner.
TUT! TUT!
Woman wants washing. Call 1536-J, after 6.
-Liner.
The woien of Vienna and also of Poland are
staining their faces and parts of the body exposed

by the decollete dress. The color is brown.
-News item.
Just think how long it would take an American
girl to do that!
OR ANY OTHER KIND
You will enjoy using A. B. A. cheques.-Ad.
I heard a young man describing anothe- the
other day and the first y. m. allowed that the other
v. m. was a bit close. He said, "Small! That guy
is so small he could walk under a duck with a silk
hat on,!"

SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River
Rotary Club Will
Hear Pres. iurto
President Marion L. Burton will ad-
dress members of the Ann Arbor Ro-
tary club Wednesday evening, and will
speak at a big mass meeting in the in-
terests of education July 21 at Colum-
bus, Ohio.
Members of the local Chamber of
Commerce are planning a reception for
the new president, at which the busi-
ness men of the city will be given a
chance to meet him. The time and
place have not been decided upon as
yet.
FIVE-YEAR-OLD BOY DIES
WHEN ICE LODGES IN THROAT
Dean Hodges, five-year-old son of
Mr. and Mrs. Medill Hodges, died Sun-
day evening of suffocation when a
piece of ice became lodged in his
threat. The lad was found uncon-
scious in the alley back of Blighty
about seven o'clock by Mrs. C. C. Bird,
who rushed him to the homoeopathic
hospital. The child had not been
breathing for 15 minutes at the time
the doctors there got hold of him, ac-
cording to them. All efforts to revive
him failed, an operation being per-
formed and oxygen pumped into his
lungs.
Mr. Hodges and his wife came here
severl months ago, the husband, en-
tering the University. and the wife
running the Blighty confectionery
store. Their home is in Dryden, Mich.,
and the body of their son will be taken
there for burial.
UNION OPEN-AIR SERVICE
ADDRESSED BY DR. TATLOCK

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Calkns
Drub'
Coo

FOUNTAIN PENS

UNIVERSIT
WA BOOKSTOR

It is easy to find one of our stores a
of them has a stock of pens from which
surely find one to suit you.
324 SOUTH STATE STREI
E. & S. UNIVERSITY AVEN
711 PACKARD STREET

11

$11.60

A GOOD SUPPLY at

THE ALLY OF EVERY OTHER SPORT -
KODAK
FOR KODAK AMATEURS THIS STORE IS G. H
Cameras, Photographic Helps and Conveniences
that make Pictu"re Making all the Easier,-Film
and Paper
EVERYTHING'S HERE
LYNDON AND COMPANY
719 NORTH UNIVERSITY

- tin C
cool Dning Roems
Reasonable Rates v
Transients Served
COR. STATE andM ONRE
PHONE 1358W
r11111l11111N Illl{

;
F,, _
:

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE
On the Huron Ri
TRUBE'
218 S. MAIN
Confection
Lunche!
When downtov
In and cool off.

"The mission of Christianity today
is to make us better men and women
in this world and deliver us from the
evils here,', declared the Rev. Henry
Tatlock at the Union' open-air service
Sunday evening.
Democratie spirit and modern sci-
ence, in co-operating with each other,
have given man the idea that he can
gain individual liberty and happiness
in this world without waiting for the
world to come, he stated. The pur-
pose of Christianity in its beginning,
gotten from the persecuted Jew, was
to save the souls of men. However,
modern Christianity seeks to make
this world better by making the men
in it live better lives, Dr.-Tatlock said.
I CHUBB HOUSE

a

FOR RENT
SAUNPERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River

I

BLUE FRONT CIGAR ST!
UNDER STUDENT MANAGEMENT
Corner State and Packard Sts.

209 South State

SEE
HOUSEHOLD PACKING (
C. E. RHEAD, MGR. PHONE 391-J
Moving, Packing & Stor,
Leading Packers of China, Cut Glass,
Pianos, and Finle Furniture.
Let us unload your goods and settle them.
Rates For Cars Furuishe'd For Moving Household
Remember the Phope Number 391-J

OPEN FOR
SUMMER
SCHOO L
"TASTES LIKE HOME"
G. S. CHUBB PROP.
SWAIN
713 E. University Avenue
develops films
and
MAKES PRINTS
with care

I

BETSY : ROSS: SHOP
THE FOUNTAIN ROOM BEAUTIFUL
13-15 NICKELS ARCADE

Fountain. Refreshments
Fine Chocolates
Fancy Gift Candy Voxes
and baskets

!=

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STUDENTS LUNCH,
409 E. JEFFERSON
OPEN 1 A.. TILL 11 P.M.

ENERGINE ODORLESS CLEANP
Kindly notice how much longer our Energine Cleani
stays clean over any other cleaning you have had.

ALWAYS
READY

LADIES
INVITED

0
Q-
U

6wacutG n.
Campsanr

bj~
Cz
CQ

REPAIRING

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River.

209 S. 4TH AVE.-ANN ARBOR-I

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