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July 13, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-13

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I

ETTLED, ITh
SHO0VERlS

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Unalurrin

AT YOUR DOC:
THREE TIME"
A WEEK

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9.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 13, 1920

PRICE FIV

JULY122 IS DATE
SEITFOR SUMMER
SPOTLIGHT SHOW
KEMP KEENA, STAR OF UNION
OPERA, TO SING POPULAR
- SONGS
PROGRAM TO INCLUDE
EIGHT. ]FEATURE ACTS
[riginal Pieces Now Being Composed
by G. H. Roderick, Who Will Head
Musical Act
Thursday, July 15, has been set as
h( date of the annual summer Spot-
ight vaudeville, given by the students
f the University Summer session in
Hilil auditorium. Plans were completed
by .the committee in charge yesterday
t its meeting in the Union.
The Spotlight show will consisttof
sght acts, which promise to be the
est that have ever been given by
ampus talent. All the people that
vill appear in the 'vaudeville have had
vide experience on the amateur stage,
.nd many of them have participated
n productions given on the campus in
ormer years.
noderick Heads Act
George H. Roderick, '21E, is to head
ne of the feature acts, and will pre-~
ent some original,'songs, with lyrics
y Russel Barnes, '20, and Howard
Veeks, '21. Barnes and Roderick fig-
red prominently this spring in the
inion opera, "George- Did It." ' They
ere responsible for the greater part1
f the musical hits of the show
Kemp Keena, '20, leading man of
George Did It," will also have a place
n the programIr. He will sing several
opular numbers. A. E. Coates, '22E,'
rho took part in the last concert of
be University glee and mandolin
lub1 to present an original whist-
.ng act. Several other good features
re 'promised by the committee in
harge. '.
More Acts Needed
It is requested by Knight Merilees,
,0, chairman of the executive corn-
ittee, that all persons who can act,
lay musi al instruments, or take partn
Scopnedy skits, get into communica-
on with him at once. He may be
eached by calling 16., Although some
xcellent talent has been secured thus
ar, it is necessary to secur several
tore good acts.
Tickets for the Spotlight vaudeville
rill be on sale at Graham's and Wahr'sj
ook stores a week from today. Theyj
ill also be sold at various points on
he. cinpus-
rinion Plans Two
Billiard Matches1
ForThis summer
Two billiard tournaments, one a
aree cushion match, the other straight
all, will be run off in the Union bil-
ard room this summer. Entries for
hie three cushion contest are now be-
ng taken, and-it is planned to startC
arly next week. An entry fee of one
ollar will be charged..'
Immediately after the conclusion ofa
his tournament, the straight rail meet
rill be conducted. Any Union mem-
er Is eligible to compete in the tour-
aments. Silver loving cups will be{
resented to the winners,.

Al Taylor, Union professional, is inc
hicago this summer, but he will re-
urn in the fall. During his absence,
he Union billiard room is in chargec
f Robert R,. Snowgress, '23, who is'
unning the tournaments.
The room will remain open until
august 25, when it will close, until
eptember 27, during which period all
f the tables will be completely re-
aired.1

SUMMER DIRECTORY
PLANSARE DROPPED
No Summer session directory will P10, ST I ITS
be issued this summer by The Wol-
verine due to the almost doubled ex-- r
pense of issuing the regular paper.
High prices of paper and increased ~ T I 24 4J B
printers' wages have so increased the
publication cost, as to necessitate the
discontinuance of the directory. ESTIMATE OF AMOUNT EARNED
However, the cards, filled out at RElGARtDED CONSERVATIVE
registration for the directory, will be BY OFFICIALS
kept at the publication offices in the
Press building, where they may be $95,OOQ IS'OTAL VALUE
used by anyone desiring the names and IN CASH OF WORK
addresses of the Summer session stu-
dents. Students using these files are Employmenf Bureau Now Taking Care
requested not to remove the cards from of All Calls for Summer
the box, which will be placed accord- Work .
ing to colleges in alphabetical order.;

i

50 People Sign For Sightseein
Excursion To Niagara Falls

LUNO GREN LEAVES
M'VICHIGAN TO 81

TRYOUTS WANTEI) FOR
THE WOLVERINE STAFF,
Tryouts for the editorial side of
The Wolverine are wanteds Any
one desiring to do any work of this I
kind should consult with the man-
aging editor from 1 to 2 o'clock
any day of the week, at the pub-
lication offices in the Press build-
ing. N
The business manager desires
tryouts for the business staff of
The Wolverine, and he will be able
to see applicants all Monday after-
noon and from 1 to 2 o'clock otherj
week days.
LIBRARY WORK IN
WAR DECRIBE

OR, WINTER TELLS,
OF GREEK CULTURE
Says Purpose of Exhibit is to Make
American People Famiiar With
Modern Greece
SLIDES SHOW VIEWS OF RUINS
IN ANCIENT CITY OF 'ATHENS
Many features of interest in the
Greek government exhibit, now being
shown in Alumni Memorial hall, were
discussed by Dr. John G. Winter, pro-
fessor of Greek and Latin, in his illus-
trated lecture given at 5 o'clock yes-
terday afternoon in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium. d t
Professor Winter said the people of
the United States are too often accus-
tomed to think of Greece as a far-off,
inaccessible country, and that the pur-
pose of the Greek government in send-
ing the exhibit to America was to
make the people of this country more
familiar with modern Greece.
Trip to Greece Reasonable
Professor Winter said the cost of a
trip to Greece was not much greater.
than that of a trip to California, and
remarked that if more people traveled
to the former place they would find a
flourishing civilization and relics of a
past glory well worth their time.
"Greece was the first of the Balkan
countries to secure freedom from the
Turkish empire," stated Professor
Winter. "The first centennial of Greek
independence will be celebrated next
year."
As the slides were presented Pro-
fessor Winter connected them with the
exhibit and explained their historical
importance. Several pictures of the
Acropolis were shown, including a
view of the approach and -the frieze.
The ruins of the Parthenon, which was
destroyed in 1687, were also described.
,Marathon, made famous by the strug-
gle between the Greeks and Persians
as well as by the Marathon races, was
presented.
Another historic spot was the pass
of Thermopyae, which was defended
by the Greek king Leoigdas with a
handful of men against the Persian
army until a treacherous countryman
led the enemy to their rear.
Mt. Olympus shown
In another slide was shown the city
of Delphi, where Greeks went in an-
cient times to consult the oracle.
Mount Olympus, the abode of the gods,
now called Mount Venizelos, in honor
of the Greek premier, was also shown.
Among other pictures of ancient
Greece were the temple of Zeus, the
Olympic st'adium, scene of the Olympic
games, and monasteries of the Greek
church. "The monasteries were al-
ways built on cliffs, with ropes let
down t'"the monks as the gnly means
of ingress or egress," said Professor
Winter.
Included in the slides of modern'
Greece were views of the Academy of
Science, the palace of King George,
street scenes in Athens, Greek mer-
chants, and costumes worn by the
Greek women.

The employment bureau of the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A. reports that from
September, 1919, to June 1, 1920, 2,414
jobs were given out to students which
netted a total cash value of $95,400.
Some students received work with-
out the aid of the bureau, making this
a conservative estimate of the amounit
that University of Michigan students
earned during the last school year to-
ward their education.
Much Money Received
The work which the students did and
the amount received from the various
jobs is as follows: For board jobs,
$69,765.50; odd job money, $4,582.30;
temporary boarid jobs, $262; room jobs,
$3,325; steady cash jobs,'$17,216; tem-
porary cash jobs, $250.
At present the employment bureau
at Lane hall is taking care of all calls
for employment, and many students of
the Summer. session are earning their
bdard by waiting tables or are earning
a part of their expenses by doing vari-
ous jobs about the city.
Importance Recognized
The University authorities have
realized the importance of this bureau,
and because Hof the extensive work
done will engage a permanent employ-
ment secretary before the opening of
the fall term.
A LTE S. WE SS, '21 1 HIil s
CHIMES ANAGER DE

S. H. Ranc k,
Tells of.S
ni
SPEAKS IN
OF AMER

Grand Rapids Librarian,
oldiers' Great Eager-
tess to Read
HIG iEST TERMS
ICAN ARMY AND NAVY

HEART

TROUBLE RESPONSIBLE
FOR IS LAST
'RELAPSE

Walter S. Riess, '21L, and business
manager of The Chimes this last year,
died at his home in Toledo at 1:30
o'clock Saturday after an illness of
almost six months. Heart trouble was
responsible.
For several weeks he had been on
the verge of death, and there were
several rumors to the effect that he
had died. Late in the first semester
Riess was taken ill with influenza, and
although he confined himself for a
short time, it was not sufficient to let
him recover, and he suffered a relapse
which caused a nervous breakdown.
He went home for a week's rest, but
returning to school although not in
the best shape, he had a second break-
down, more serious than the first.
Since that time in February, he was.
confined to his home with small
chance held for his recovery, and his
death Saturday had been expected for
some time.
Riess was one of the most promi-
nent men on the Michigan campus, and
he had achieved great success in ad-
vertising work. He holds the honor of
being twice business manager of the
Gargoyle, in 1918 and 1919, and he was
chosen the first business manager of
The Michigan Chimes in 1920, which
paper he is said to have first advo-
cated.
GOMBERG GIVING CHEMISTRY
LECTURES AT CALIFORNIA U
Prof. Moses Gomberg of the chem-
istry department is giving lectures on
inorganic chemistry at the University
of California at its Summer session.

The work of the American Library'
association in France during the war
was described by S. H. Ranck of
Grand Rapids, Monday evening in the
Natural Science auditorium,
Mr. Ranchp was one of the official
photographers and workers sent to
France by the American Library asso-
ciation. The slides, which were shown,
were ,all taken by the speaker who
said he found "Sunny France" a poor
place to take pictures because of the
incessant rainy periods.
Two MlllloIn Books Sent
The American Association, according
to the. speaker, sent over two and a
half million' books to France to be
distributed among the soldiers in the
army camps, Y. M. C. A., Knights of
Columbus, Salvation Army, and other
huts. Only one million of these books
were returned, the rest being kept in
France in the American library estab-
lislied in Paris by the American asso-
ciation.
The gathering and distribution of
the books, which was illustrated by
pictures thrown on the screen, was
under the direction of trained profes-
sional library workers, he stated.
Eager to Read
The eagerness with which the soli
diers literally devoured any reading
matter from American shores was
shown by pictures which Mr. Ranck
had taken of the soldiers reading
whenever time and place permitted.
In closing, the speaker spoke in the
highest terms of admiration of the
work which the American army and
navy accomplished in France.
SUMMER BUILDING WORK ON
CAMPUS IS BEING RUSHED
Work is"'being rapidly pushed on the
remodeling of the main wing of Uni-
versity hall and of President Burton's
home. Substantial progress is also
being made on the construction of the
new nurses' home and the Betsy Bar-
bour dormitory..
No other building plans or programs
for improving campus buildings have
been announced by the building and
grounds department for the summer.
SECOND MEETING OF DEANS
WITH PRESIDENT WEDNESDAY
The second meeting of the deans of
the various schools of the University
with the president will be held at 10
o'clock Wednesday in the president's
office.
The Board of Regents will meet Fri-
day, July 23.

About 50 people have signed up so
far for the Niagara Galls trip to be
made this week-end, and it is expected
that at least 25 more will go. All per-
sons planning to take the trip should
see those in charge at once as accom-
modations have been made for only 80
people.
The trip will be in charge of Mr.
F. W. Frostic, superintendent of the
Wyandotte schools, and Prof. Irving
D. Scott, of the geology department.
Leaves Here Friday
The party will leave the local inter-
urban waiting room at 2:05 o'clock
Friday afternoon for Detroit, from
where it will go to Buffalo by boat,
arriving at 9 o'clock Saturday morning
at I uffalo.
Saturday will be devoted to the
study of the lower rapids, gorge, whirl-
pool, Foster's Flats, where there was
a double falls similar to the one now
at Goat island at an earlier period in
the geology history; and the original
point of beginning of the~falls at the
bluff at Lewiston, which overlooks the
plain of Lake Ontario.
Visit Points of Interest
Sunday will be devoted to study and
sight seeing about the American and
Canadian falls. All special points of
interest will be visited, including Goat
island, Cave of the Winds, upper rap-
ids, and the Maid of the Mist trip.
Emphasis will be laid on the his-
torical and geographical significance
of the falls,' as well as on the geolog-
ical story.
The party will return by boat Sun-
day evening to Detroit and will arrive
at 10:30 o'clock Monday morning in
Ann Arbor.
THIS WEEK'S LECTURE
PROGRAMIs CHANCE
TIME OF EDUCATIONAL MOTION
PICTURES IS AD-
TANCED
Two changes in the program of con-
certs and lectures as announced in'
Saturday's Wolverine have been made.
The educational pictures will be
given at 7 o'clock instead of 8 o'clock
Thurisday, and there will be a lecture
that evening on the Greek government
exhibit by Prof. Herbert R. Cross of
the Fine Arts department on "Ionian
Greece." Miss Heleh Grimes of the'
department of justice, Washington, P.
C., will speak at 8 o'clock, July 19, onl
"The High Cost of Living." -
The motion pictures will consist of
two reels on astronomical subjects,
illustrating the Yerkes observatory at'
Williams Bay, Wis., one reel'showing'
the work of glaciers and one illustrat-
ing the work of rivers.
Mr. E. O Marsh, who lectures on the#
intermediate school Friday afternoon,
is considered a specialist in this type
of school, which is between the gram-
mar and high school, and according to
local officials; has made a decided suc-
cess of it in Jackson, where he is su-
perintendent of schools.
This afternoon Prof. T. E Rankin
of the Rhetoric department, will speak
on "The Effect of War on Literature,"
and Dr. Nellie Perkins of the psycho-
pathic clinic of Wayne county, will
speak on "Psychopaths, 'Who Appear
Before the Court," tonight. Tomor-,
rqw afternoon Prof. E. D. Dickinson
of the Law school, will lecture on "The
Outlook for International Law," an
the School of Music will give a pro-
gram tomorrow evening.
Thursday at 5 o'clock, Mr. F. W.
Frostic will speak on Niagara Falls

and the program for the evening is asf
announced above. Friday there will
be the Niagara Falls trip, the lecture
of Mr. Marsh in the afternoon, and a
reading by Prof. R. D. T. Hollister ona
"Silas Marner" Friday evening in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall.

ATilIST,
FIRMS

NO ONE SELECTED YET
FOR VACANT POSITION
Successor Will Probably Be Chosen by
Fall; Big Hole. teft by
Carl's Retiring
Carl. Lundgren, Michigan baseball
mentor since 1914, will not be at
Michigan next year, the Athletic asso-
ciation announced yesterday, in con-
firming the reports from Urbana, ;Ill.,
that the Michigan man had been ,se-
cured to coach, at Illinois, where he
graduated 15 yeays ago.
As yet no one 'has been selected to
fill the vacancy, although there are
several prominent and brainy baseball
men under consideration. 4It is ei-
pected that a successor to Lundgren
will be named at least ly next fall, as
for some time there have been strings
out for an available man.
Leaves Big Hole
Lundgren's return to Illinois will
leave a big hole' to fill, and it will be
a big source of worry to Michigan, as
the Ili i nines have always presented
the hardest opposition to Wolverine
teams. It, is doubtful if there is a
better coach in the Conference than
Lunidgren, and one man ventured the
opinion that he is as'good as 75 per-:
cent of the major league managers.
Love., fo his alma mater was the
principal r\son for Lundgren's leav-
ing Michigan. In fact the salary, which
he will receive at' Illinois for coac~hing
and teaching in t e School of Coaches
will fall a little short of what he re-
ceived here.
After' Lundgren For Year
For more than a year the Urbana
institution "has been after Lundgren.
George Huff; Illinois ,coach for 24
years, retired a year ago, and it was
then that the efforts of Illinois began.
Temporarily the hole was filld by
Potsy Clark,. who has\ left to coach
football at the Michigan Aggies next
fall, and then the real drive for Lund-
gren began.
Appealing to his loyalty to Illinois
and the duty which he owed his alma
mater, he was finally drawn away, and
he will begin his activities there next
fall, when he begins teaching in the
School of Coaches.
While at Michigan, Lundgren made
one of the most enviable records pos-
sible. Since 1914 he has been here,
and in one of these years, 1917, inter-
collegiate sports were abolished on.
account of the war. However, in his
six years of active coaching he brought
one intercollegiate title and three Con-
ference championships to Michigan.
Succeeds Rickey
He began work here in 1914, suc-
ceeding Branch Rickey who had left to
(Continued on Page 4)
MICHIGAN SUIMER SESSION
GAINS ON OTHER SCHOOLS
Figures received by Dean E. H.
Kraus of' the Summer session from
summer schools at other universities
show that the enrollment here com-
pares favorably with them.
One of these reports, that of Colum-
bia university, shows a registration of
9,500, while preparations had been
made for 11,000. The University of
Iowa has 1,250 students as against
1,142 last year.
The enrollment here last year was
1,961, while this year it is 2,250. This
gives Michigan a 14 per cent gain,
while Iowa has had only a 9 per cent
gain. The same comparison holds for
most schools with Michigan,.

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l1i'PORTS I ROM'
I RBA

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luarry's
Graham's or
Wolverine Off.

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olveri ne

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