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July 08, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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TUDENT N WSPAPER OF THE SUMMER
OF TI-F NIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday Afternoons.,
Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Tones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Managing Editor, :oo to 2:oo o'clock daily, except
y; Business Manager, 1 :00 to 2:00 o'clock
daily,,except Saturday.
*ns not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signatures
to be p~ublished in print, but as an evidence of
ces of events will be published in The Wolverine
n of .the Editor, if left or mailed to the office.
mmunications will receive no consideration. No
be returned unless the writer encloses postage.
ne does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ommunications, .
W. SARGENT, Jr......... Managing' Editor

............Business Manager

VWDAY, JULY 8, 1920
ING VS. LEARNING
procedure in this day of graphic
weigh various forces such as
tress and resistance, and educa-
, in a sort of human scale.
better method, let us apply this
:ation of the question of formal
:ion of no mean proportions in
are to take the words of certain

>ols are teach-
g? Is it 1:1,

ans
t w

r is that what is learned is.
t is taughtis learned. The
the other hand, declare that
be learning more than we are
r reason than that education
gressive factor. As for the
is some doubt. There is no
t amount of the wisdom being
ssrooms gets no further than
tfair to charge our. educational
ngs that 're forgotten by the
education endures, there will
nassimilated by every student.
lay be off-set by .a balancing
h our students are learning in
ducation but which are not
'one save themselves.
all this seems to be that the
sproperly, the ratio between
and what we are teaching.
rnger which threatens the very,
aal system.
at ourstudents should learn
taught. They must learn a
than appears in any catalogue
y any superintendent. Presi-
rue task for our educational
that it must serve to release
[i exists in every youth. It
ity to face a set of conditions
tainty in his ability to cope

spirit of rivalry and contest,' which le ds the real
charm to athletics, is lacking in all of these summer
sports except tennis, and it appears as though there
is a consequent apathy. In the regular terms, the
intramural department provides divers sports, which
furnish this rivalry and which draw into them the
majority of the students, but unfortunately, the in-
tramural director is away for the summer. How-
ever, it does seem as if something in this line could
be undertaken' by the athletic association, or the
students, themselves. There are many branches of
athletics, which could be organized and which would
interest persons who otherwise would take no exer-
cise at all. A golf tournament might bring out
those who love old Colonel Bogey's game; organiza-
tion of teams for a soft and hard ball league would
prove a lure to hundreds; rugby football would
attract others ; and a swimming meet might draw
more to the river.
Many of the summer students are interested in
such things. Let's hear something'about it.
Editorial Comment
WORKLESS, HEATLESS, LIGHTLESS DAYS
Coal operators and dealers are steadily repeating
the 'warning that unless there is immediate relief
from the car shortage at the mines, workless, heat-
less, lightless days will be so common next winter
that the similar experiences of war days will be com-
pletely overshadowed. One of the largest operators
of the country is cited as authority for the statement
that twenty mining properties in Illinois which
normally produce 50,ooo tons a day have for months
averaged only about one-fourth that output.
Lack of cars is cited as the sole reason. Cars
whch cost $8oo each before the war are now $3,300
each. Even at this price their production cannot fill
the demand. At this period,.when production and
transportation should be at their best, and reserves
should be piling up for the winter, the output of
coal is barely equal to the current demand. The
warning of serious difficulties next winter therefore
seems well. founded. But the shortage of coal cars
cannot be attributed solely to depreciation of rolling
stock or to high cost of replacements. Automobile
manufacturers are driving many new cars to mar-
ket, but at the same time they are usingopen top
cars extensively for long distance shipments. In
this, it would seem, they are showing singular lack
of foresight. These cars should be hauling coal, not
automobiles. If they do not haul coal now instead
of automobiles it seems certain that there will be no
coal available for the manufacture of automobiles
later.
Manufacturers would do well to study this situa-
tion and agree on methods whereby all the available
coal cars should be used exclusively for transporta-
tion of coal. Neither the mines nor'the railroads
seem to be able to solve the difficulty alone. Unless
every interest involved cooperates it appears that
the problem will go unsolved and the heatless, work-
less, lightless days will 'develop from a warning to
a reality.-.Chicago Tribu'ne
Abaft the News
You can't excuse
01' George Fox.
With black shoes
He wears white sox.
There is one great truism that you can't fail to
learn here in Summer School. There is nothing like
a hammock for bringing ^the young people
together.
GIRLS ! DON'T READ THIS!
Men's Shirts, 20% off at Cappers.-Adv.
Someone was telling me that .one of the men

working on the street paving job was arrested on a
serious charge the other day. Yes, dear reader, he
was caught knocking the tar out of his broom.
dome, my love, and let us fly,
- A poem coming? Not a bit.
Only because it's now July,
And fly so nicely rhymes with it.
THAT GIRL'S GOT GALL NOW
Miss Winnief red Wolper of Saline, and Otto
Gall of this place, were united in marriage Tuesday
afternoon at the home of the bride.
-Bridgewater News.
WERE YOU SITTING UP FRONT WITH
THE CHAUFFEUSE, WALT?
Walter Bertke's chauffeuse tried to teach his auto
to climb a telegraph' pole Sunday. No one was se-
riously injured. Better drive your own car, Walter.
--Washtenaw News.
WHERE THE MODERN DANCE
ORIGINATED
Somebody told me the other day that it says' in
the New Testament, "Iet those things that can be
shaken, be shaken."

llnrnett Goes To
Liberty Nofor Co.
Verne E. Burnett, '17, who has been
the editor of the National Gleaner
Forum,. the newyspaper of the Gleaner,
organization, has joined the advertis-
ing department of the Liberty Motor
Car company of Detroit.
Burnett, who was editor of The
Wolverine in the summer of 1916, won
a national college editorial contest
while associate editor of The Michigan
Daily. During the war he served in
the Motor Transport corps, acting as
instructor at Camp Johnston, and later
serving inthe same branch in Franep.
For several months he was detailed
to "The Stars dnd Stripes" in Paris,
and to "Trench and Camp" while at
Camp Custer.
The National Gleaner Forum, of
which Burnett has been editor for
more than a year, ha. been published
at AnnArbor.
Subscriptions to The Wolverine, per
summer session, $1.00.
Try Wolverine Want Ads. They
get results.-Adv.

Try our Michigan Linen-a good quality-
fabric finished paper at 40 cents per pound.
Envelopes to match at 15 cents per package.
Best quality Kara Linen, 50 cents per pound.
Envelopes to match at 20 cents per package.
"'EVERYTHING N STATIONERY."
WHRSUNIVERS
BOOKSTO:

14AIK

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Expert Marcelling

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On the Huron River
S WAI N
713 E. University Avenue
develops films

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TYPEWRITERS bot
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STATIC

A Place for Particular

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17 Nickels Arcade

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\.

I

SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS
Cool Ot
111t FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH
STATE AND LIBERTY STREETS
ICE CREAM HOME MADE CANDI

ation must either do this or be branded as a
iechanical process by means of which facts
tnulas are preserved to posterity. Education
ery nature, must give more than it has. Our
s, if true to the highest aims of their calling,
uild better than they know"!'
SUMMED SPORTS
good starts toward providing physical exer-
the summer students have been made, but
yem hardly sufficient to interest the entire
body. With 'the announcement of the tennis
rent to be conducted in the near future, and
masium classes already'under way, part of.
and for organized play will be satisfied, but
themselves do-not seem capable of fulfilling
eeds.
hose interested in tennis, the regular play on
rts, especially that preliminary to a tourna-
id the real work of the contest, should keep
Isy, and-afford sufficient exercise for the
>layers. A large number 'of students will
ersion in the gym classes; being conducted
May. There are undoubtedly some, who,
the hot sun and the dusty roads, go out for
.ks on the boulevards and in the country.
erhaps drop down to the river or out to
re for an occasional swim. These activities
the time of many; give them physical work
to keep their minds active, but it seems hard-
Ae to interest in these things all of the Sum-
tents, desiring outdoor exercise.
e first place, while tennis is a great game
attracts the 'attention of~ many, 'it must. be
[that there are quite a few people who do
it. In a gymnasium, almost anyone can
vay an hour or so in, vigorous exercise, but
;ort of 'weather, a hot 'workout in '.a5 stuffy
um is not attractive. Swimming is pleas-
igh; walking not so much so on a warm
n on a dusty road.
rst two sports are not urtiversally appealing,
ems to us that the essential thing lacking in
wo is the lack of organrization and a unity,
ill bring out the non-ii iterested, the ones
3 ujst a slight impetus tci get them out. The

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,{
On the Huron River
When you want your hair cut
Use Yodr Head
ARCADE
BARBER
- SHOP -
NO. 6 NICKELS ARCADE
FOR RENTr
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY
On the Huron River
CHUBB HOUSE
209 South State
OPEN FOR
SUMMER
SCHOOL
"TASTES LIKE HOME"
G. S. CHUBB, PROP.
READY'TO SERVE
Fromlln a. m. tolp.M. and
Sto 7p.um.
Pot of Hot Tea and Bowl of Rice
PLAIN CIIOP SUEY 5 C
CHINESE. and AMER. STYLE.
SHOR.T ORDICKS
QVANO TVN LO
613 East Liberty

THE

Coo

«Y

In

Lane Hall

-- _

FOR MEN AND WOMEN

RATES
LUNCH and DINNER per week
LUNCH - - -
DINNER - - -

$5.

WE SERVE
Good Food, appetizingly cooked'
Delicious Special Bricks
Every Sunday

Get One from Our Dealer
Next Sunday
IC E C REA M
Sold at the best Soda Fountains
in over Three Hundred Michi-
gan Towns and Cities.

5,

If Robert Browning were extant now
I wonder if he would say,
Instead of the old familiar words,
" Boot-leg, to horse and away ?"

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS'. CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River

C. A. CONNOR ICE CRE
416 FOURTH STREET

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