100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 08, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L

Uinlurbw

THREE T

A WEEK

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 8, 1920

PRICE FIV

RE ROSENAU LECTURES
I THIS AFTERNOON
This afternoon at 5 o'clock Prof.
William Rosenau will give the last of
r U his series of lectures on the Jew, his
" title being, "Americanism and Judaism
" -'-Their Hopes and Ideals."
Educational motion pictures will be
S REAL shown tonight, which will deal with
ID historical themes, there being one reel,
which will depict "French Exploration
in North America"; another entitled,
WAR "English Settlements in North Amer-
SAYS ica"; while a third will show "The
Westward Movement." These films are
iowment furnished by the Society of Visual Edu-
nd cation, of which Dean V. C. Vaughan
of the Medical School, is a member of
the board of directors.
The lectures Friday will be given
haven a- by Dr. F. E. Spaulding, superintendent
ave re- of the Cleveland public schools, and
f J ns who has recently-been elected dean of
for on the graduate school of education at
mericaOn Yale university. His afternoon lecture
," , ill, - il l..

SPOTLIGHT PLAIS
B ADY0 COMMITTEE

CALL FOR

VAUDEVILLE TALENTI

WILL .BE ISSUED
SOON

ANNOUNCE ASSISTANTS
TO GENERAL CHAIRMAN

Program With Special Appeal
Teachers and Graduates Will
Be Arranged

to

efore the
niversity

the presence of the
America, Professor
Phe Jews' life in this
Is real service and
They have never re-
nship between gov-
as a one-sided affair,
at it is a reciprocal
atriotism
ed toshow their pa-
rone is aware of the
ssm expresses itself
.s of war, but also in
We have risen to a
of patriotism now,
stirring days of the

' wii ne-What the Teaching Prores-
sion Has to Offer," and the evening
one, "Making Public Education Equal
lo Its Task."
MiLL BE GIVEN
Iii Connection With Government's .Ex-
hibit Now Being Held in Alumni
i-morial Hall
PROF. JOHN C. WINTER TO BE
FIRST SPEAKER; CROSS NEXT
A series of three lectures on Greek
subjects, with possible additions to the
list at a later date, has been announced
in connection with the exhibition of
the Greek government now being held

i the countries where the
ot comfortably situated, he
lacked in patriotism. Our
hics emphasize patriotism.
race residedin Judea, that
ewas a buffer-b~etween the
:h, east, and west, but even
Lst of the misfortunes that
a, their patriotism was dis-
er the mandatory rights en-
ertain powers. -
Filling to Sacrifice
ime, even in ,the dark ages,
Jews charged with unwil-
make sacrifices. Consider
tness with which our race
ainst the Central Powers
Russian front, during the
of the late war. The Hebrew
always maintained the an-
:'Thou shalt not bear
ited States has done won-
he Jew. It has given him
es for self-expression ac-
the divine plan. In return,
ni ready at all times to give
his country in various ways.
ven service to the United
all branches of the army,
marine corps, besides send-
other side, welfare workers,
I chaplains. More men and
>lied for service in the wel-
than the committee could
iany Die Fighting
combative service, the Jews
two percent more soldiers
t than our population in the
ites warranted, and more
fighting on the battle field
roportion of our population
Jews have fqght for
ver since its founding. They
in the Revolution against
a the Mexican war, and on
during the Civil war.
r America's most famous ad-
i generals belonged to the.
ce. In the last war. Admiral

in Alumni.Memorial hall.
"Ionia" Cross' Subject

I

Prof. John G. Winter will give the
first lecture of the series next Monday
evening, the subject of his address to'
be reported later. Prof. H. R. Cross
of the Fine' Arts department will speak
July 19 on Ionia."
Prof. Aristides E. Phoutrides of the,
University of Athens and formerly
professor at Harvard university, will
give the third lecture of the series on
"Modern Greek Legends and Folk
Songs." He is responsible for the
translation into English of the poems
of Kostes Palarnas, the leading poet
of Greece at the present time.
Interest Sustained
Interest in the exhibit is sustained,
and each afternoon there is a large
number of visitors, in the hall. A party
of students from the State Normal
school at Ypsilanti were here yester-
day afternoon to be conducted through
the exhibit.
Visual Educationp
Mran Is Alumnus
Rex A. Collins, '12, the Michigan
representative of the Society for Vis-
ual Education, of which Dean Victor
C. Vaughan of the Medical scho-ol, is a
director, was in the city yesterday, ar-
ranging with Dean E. H. Kraus for the
educational motion pictures which will
be shown here on the Summer Session
program.
"We are trying to bring out better
educational films," Collings said. "Peo-
ple in viewing them should take the
attitude of teachers, conducting classes
in particular subjects. They are dis-
tributed as teachers' tools, to vitalize
and supplement the text books. The
pictures are made with the purpose of
accomplishing more work with the
same effort and in the same time."
He said that the distribution service
is limited to schools in just a few
states of the country. The offices of
the society are at Chicago,

Plans for the Summer Spotlight of
the Union were mapped out and each
member of the committee assigned a
part of the work at a meeting yester-
day afternoon of the committee in
charge of arrangements.
Atwood Handles rograms
Knight Mirrielees, '20E, is general
chairman. Other members of the com-
mittee are: ILeland Atwood, '23, in
charge of programs; Lewis.Williams,
in charge of tickets; Durban Long-
necker, '21E, stage manager; Hamilton
Cochran, '23, publicity manager; and
George Roderick, 21E, in charge of
the various acts.
A call will be issued soon fort stu-
dents with talent in vaudeville acts
of any kind to try out for the Spot-
light. Some one who an put across
a good monologue act is especially
needed.
Will Appeal to Teachers
The program will be arranged to
make a special appeal to the graduate
students and school teachers of the
Summer Session. It is their Spotight
and their participation in the acts is
wanted as much as that of the under-
graduates, the committeemen stated.
EDUCATIONAL CLUB"
HAS FIRST MEETING
Addresses by President M. R. Bur-
ton, President L. D. Coffman of the
University of Minnesota, and Dean E.
H. Kraus featured the first meeting of
the Men's Educational club held last
night at the Union. The talks were
followed by business transactions and
arrangements were made for a ball
game this afternoon.
Dean Kraus spoke in-regard to the
Summer Session and its ideals. "Edu-
cational Tendencies" was the subject
of President Coffman's talk, and Presi-
dent Burton spoke generally on affairs
of the University.
The Educational club, which is com-
posed of the principals, superintend-
ents and teachers in the Summer Ses-
Sion' each year, made arrangements
for a ball game on Ferry Field this
afternoon between members of the
club and the faculty. After the game
at 4:30, there will be a dinner.
VISITORS' NIGHTS TICKETS
TO BE DISTRIBUTED JULY 15
Tickets for visitors' nights at the
observatory, which are July 21, 22, and
23, will be distributed after July 15
at the office of the Summer Session.
In previous years large crowds have
visited the observatory on these nights,
it being necessary to run the people
through in three shifts.
Astronomical motion pictures will
be featured next week, to arouse in-
terest in these special nights.
.NEW MINNESOTA EXECUTIVE
VISITS PRESIDENT BURTN
Dr. L. D. Coffman, plesident of the
University of Minnesota, and successor
toesident M. L. Burton,' was 'in the
city yesterday, visiting Dr. Burton. Be-
fore becoming the head of Minnesota,
President Coffman was dean of the
School of Education and Summer Ses-
sion there.

DR. CABOT TALKS
ON ANAESTHETICS
Dr. Hugh Cabot, of the Medical
school, gave the second of the series of
medical lectures last -evening in the
Natural Science auditorium, speaking
upon "Anaesthesia and Anaesthetics;
Their Modern Conceptions."
In his lecture he told of the changes
that have occurred in regard to anaes-
thetics in the past few years, one of
these being the discovery of the fact
that though nitrous oxide could be used
only a short time in the pure state, by
mixing it with oxygen the patient could
be kept under its influence for a period
of an hour or two without injury.
The difficulty with using the latter
method lies in the fact that it requires
an expert to give the nitrous oxide and
dxygen combination, an individual who
can not easily be found except in
large hospitals, due to the fact that it
requires sever.l years' special train-
ing. He spoke favorably of the nitrous
oxide in comparison with ether and
chloroform
Dr. Cabot described the difference
between local and general anaesthetics
in that the former made only a portion
of the body insensible to pain, while
the latter, besides rendering the whole
bo'dy insensible to pain, made the pa-
tient unconscious so as to do away
with any nervousness that might occur
from witnessing the operation.
e '
NIAGARA TRIP .SET
t FOR NEXTERD
Reservations For Excursion Being
Taken by F. W. Frostic, Who
Conducts Party *
LOW RATES ARE ATTRACTING
MANY PEOPLE TO GO TO FALLS
Rex A. Collings, '12, the Michigan
Reservations for the annual Summer
Session excursion to Niagara Falls,
which is to be the next weekend, can
be made with F. W. Frostic,from 7:30
to 11:30 o'clock any morning, or from
7 to 9 o'clock any evening in Room
440-G of the Natural Science building.
Prof. 1. D. Scott will also make res-
ervations in Room 432-G.
Approximately 75 people made the
trip last year, and with the expecta-
tion of an even larger crowd this year,
accommodations for 100 have been re-
served this summer. The low expense,
of the excursion has attracted many.
Frostic in Charge
The party, which will be in charge
of F. W. Frostic of the geology depart-
ment, will leave Ann Arbor at 2:05
o'clock Friday afternoon, July 16, for
Detroit by special interurban cars.
From there the trip to Buffalo will be
made on the Detroit and Cleveland
steamer, Detroit III.
Arriving in Buffalo early Saturday
morning, the party will leave immedi-
ately for Niagara, where Saturday will
be spent in visiting such important
places of interest along the Gorge
route as The Whirlpool, the Rapids,
Foster's Flats, and the Niagara escarp-
ment at Queenstown, returning along
the American side to the head of the
Falls.
Sunday will be devoted to Goat
Island, the Upper Rapids, the Ameri-
can and Canadian falls, the Cave of
the Winds, and the Maid of the Mist
trip.
Party Returns Sunday

The party ill return Sunday even-
ing on the City of Cleveland, and will
reach Ann Arbor at 10:30 o'clock Mon-
day morning.
Prof. I. D. Scott of the geology de-
partment, will accompany the party
and explain the principal points of
geological interest. In order to pre-
pare the members of the excursion for
the trip, Mr. Fostic will give a geologi-
cal lecture on the formation of Niagara
Falls, Thursday afternoon.

WHAT'S GOING ON

July 9
5 p. m.-Americanism and Judaism,-
Their Common Hopes and Ideals.
Prof. William Rosenau, of Johns
Hopkins university.
8 p. m.-Educational Motion Pictures.
July
5 p. m. and 8 p. m.-Some Present-Day
Educational Problems (two lec-
tures). Mr. F. E. Spaulding, Super-
intendent of Schools, Cleveland.
July 12
5 p. m.-The Greek Government Ex-
hibit (illustrated). Prof. J. G.
Winter.
8 p. m.--The Work of the American
Library Association in France (il-
lustrated). Mr. S. H. Rack, of
Grand Rapids.
July 13
5 p. m.-The Effect of the War upon
Literature. Prof. T. E. Rankin.
8 p. m.-Medical Lecture. Dr. Nellie
Perkins.
July 14
5 p. m.-The Outlook for International
Law. Prof. E. D. Dickinson.
8 p. m.--Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music. "(Hill Audi-
torium.)
TENNIS MEET TO
COMMENCE SOON
A tennis tournament under the direc-
tion of Dr. May will be held in the
near future for students of the Sum-
mer Session. Those who wish to enter
should hand in their names with an
entry fee of 25 cents, at the Athletic
office, or to Dr. May at the gymnasium
before. Wednesday, so that drawings.
can be announced quickly.
Both singles and doubles will be
held In the tournament, and prizes will
be given to the winners.. The tourna-
ment last ,year saw the entry of 60 con-
testants, and it is expected that more
will compete in the coming tourna-
ment.
NET ENROLLMENT
RU ACHES 2218 TOTAL
L
Figures on enrollment, which were
compiled by Dean E. H. Kraus Mon-
day, show that the toal net registra-
tion is 2,218. This deducts for double
enrollment and also counts out any
students, who have withdrawn.
The number in the different schools
and colleges is: Literary, 1,182; engi-
neering, 437; medical, 159; law, 126;
graduate, 296; pharmacy,18; biological
station, 40.
Dean Kraus stated that he expected
late entrants to bring the total up to
2,250, making this year's record ap-
proximately 300 greater than in 1919,
the largest Summer Session.
DR. MAY URGES MORE STUDENTS
TO MAKE USE OF GYMNASIUM
The regular gym classes, being cow
dlucted for Summer school students by
Dr. May, are being attended by nearly
75 students. At present there are about
300 gym lockers taken, and those stu-
dents who are not enrolled in the reg-
ular class work use the floor at hours
when it is not occupied by classes.
More students are urged by Dr. May
to avail themselves of this opportunity
to receive instruction in the various
kinds of gymnasium work under in-
struction.

I

UNPAID SUBSCRIPTIONS
Those who have subscribed for
The Wolverine but have not paid
for it should either mailsthe dollar
to The Wolverine, Press building,
or leave same at the office, second
floor, Press building. Office hours,*
8:30 to 12, and 1:30 to 5:00 o'clock.

DEPARTMENT
RESEARCH W
BOARD OF REGENTS TO
REPORT AT ITS NEX'
MEETING
RESULT OF COMMIT
CONFERENCE JU
New Work Will Consist In Aid
dustries of State in Techni
Experiments
Recommendations will be m
the Board of Regents in its nex
ing, July 23, for the establishiu
a department of engineering re
in the University, as a ,resul
conference yesterday between
visory board, appointed by the
gan Manufacturers' association,
committee of faculty members
posed of President Marion L. I
Dean M. E. Cooley, and Profes
E. White and J. E. Emswiler
engineering college.
The plan to be placed befo
Regents is for the research t
ment to be founded as soon a
sible, the department to be in
of a director appointed by the R
with an - administrative con
consisting of the heds of th4
mechanical, electriceal, .chemics
rine, aeronautic, and architectu
gineering departments.
Will Cooperate
Its purpose will be to assist
dustrial and technical interests
state by practical cooperation
search ajud experiment.
Discussing the- need for such
partment, Dean Cooley point
that while the agricultural c
throughout the country have
doing all in their. power to ass
farming interests, there has b
real organized service made a
up to the present time for the
tries of the country in the carr
of vital research work.
"During the war the Natio
search council served the count:
terests, and they are now plan
function vigorously, along the
lines in peaceful pursuits," sa
Cooley. "This, council has alre
ceived the sum of five million
for research work, although all
sum may not be available for th
proper. England has realized t
for research work and has sub
research work to many hu
of thousands of dollars with the
standing that the industries
provide a like amount."
most Is. Great
"The cost of carrying on r
work has been such that on
larger establishments could un
it," Dean Cooley,=added. "That
tion is as true today as it hAs I
years past. However, through
tablishment of a department o
neering research' atithe Unive:
is hoped that the smaller indus
the state may receive the hel
desire and that the larger, id
Will profit by securing properly
,1en for carrying on their o
search work in case they feel th
are in better position to perfor
own work than is the U nivers
said.
POOR GRADES WILL KEEP 1
FROM SCHOOL NEXT SE1I
/

Registrar Arthur G. Hall he
out letters to parents of 191 s
in the literary school saying the
work during the past semester
of a sufficiently high grade to
them to continue their work
present.
This number, according to Re
Hall, is proportionally large
usual. , All but 17 of the letter
sent to the parents of male stud

.mous American
the North Sea.
ards numbered
nbers.

ir the
mine
The
Jews

war, but as well as in
sh people have served
ed on Page 4)

ibe at

Wolverine

$1.00
Phone
960.

-I

Subscribe Now!

The-

Wolberine

$1.00.
-Phone
960

The

Campus

e or at

I

ivered- to your Door Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan