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August 05, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-05

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THE WOLVERINE

Xloverine

b c

OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE, SUMMER SESSION
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second-class matter
Subscription by carrier or mail, $1.oo
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street
Phones : Business-gbo ; Editorial-2414
Office Hours: Managing Editor-i:oo to 2 0 o'clock daily except Saturday; Business
Manager-1:oo to 2:00 o'clock daily except Saturday
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
ar in print, but as an evidence of faith, and notices of events will be published in The
Uolverineat the discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No manuscript wll be returned
iless the writer incloses postage.
The Wolverine does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed in the communications.
Mark K. Ehlbert......................Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 2227-NI
J. Ellsworth Robinson .................Business Manager
Phone 2414 or 1505
esser M. Campbell.............City Editor 1 Howard Weeks...............Column Editor
ilton Marx................Associate Editor Martha Guernsey............Womei's Editor
Mark B. Covell...............Assistant Business Manager
Thornton W. Sargent Jr...................Issue Editor
REPORtgRS
F. G. Merz J. E. Beretta Robert W. Taylor
H. 1-. Heth Samuel Lamport Edgar L. Rice
BUSINESS STAFF
P. Schneider Richard Lambrecht
William Wachs
TUESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1919

we are tending. President Lowell has said that an underpaid teacher is a
discontented teacher, a teacher who lacks responsibility and loyalty to his
high office. Of this we have had abundant evidence in the case of those who
have left their professorships to teach socialism in, the cities-and have
there received far greater pay for subversive doctrine than they received
as faculty members. But the case is worse than that. When teachers are
underpaid and discontented, the profession fails to attract the more vigorous
and ambitious type of youth. The gradual decline in the mental and the
character standard of university faculties is not so obvious as the occa-
sional instance of radical discontent; but it is well understood by those
who are in a position to know, and in the long run it is far more dangerous.
The duty to the alma mater is a duty of transcendent importance to the
nation.-The New York Times.
According to a report, there is talk that Lenine is going to resign. When
it comes to speaking of Lenine, "talk" is about the best word they could
have used.
Chicago rents go up 100 per cent in October. Wonder if that explains
in any way Detroit's reaching the 1,000,000 mark?
Of 66 cases started in one court last week, 40 were divorce cases. Prob-
ably the other 26 were started by single persons.
Actors threaten to go on strike. But what if audiences did the same?
Vienna interns Bela Kun. Bolshevik papers please copy.

M ID SUMMER
BOOK SALE
OUR TABLES AND COUNTERS ARE FAIRLY GROANING
WITH BARGAINS
in books of Education, History, Economics, Mathematies, Chemistry,
etc. Come early and bring your basket.
Wah r's University Bookstores
For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You vill enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20 $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASKAUS
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 s. Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)
Go to LYNDON'S 719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Eastman Kodaks Eastman Films
GUARANTEED AMATEUR FINISHING
ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY
We have led in;amateur finishing for twelve years and are still lead-
ing :-Why? Because we give you QUALITY. We guarantee our devel-
oping !r no charge. We have the latest and best equipped store in the
State and our help is experienced in every line of Photography.
IF YOU WANT SATISFACTION BRING YOUR FILMS TO
Hill Auditorium LY N & COMPANY UniversityAvenue

THEY CALL IT SNOBBERY

No term is applied more indiscriminately than "the snob." Whoever
ippens to be late for an 8 o'clock, rushing pell-mell through doors and
.l1s, too hurried to see anything or anyone, whoever, is unfortunate
hough to fail to recognize somebody he has met, whoever declines an invi-
tion, why-we christen him "a snob."
It might be difficult to define a snob, since most of the time he does not
:ist, except in our own thoughts. A candid definition from most of the
implaining would be,-one who does not happen to fulfill our own petty
sires, dance to our own tunes, pamper our idle tastes. The snob does
irive, but he is most active on occasions when few of us notice him; per-
aps he even dominates "you and me."
The snob is active when college opens in the fall and hundreds of
eophytes pour in with glittering high school pins and bursting carpet
gs, radiant in expectation but very, very "lost." The snob gets his work
. so well that soon the glamor fades, and the new arrivals wander around
ke so many peris shut from the gates of Paradise. The genuine snob is
ireasoning; he never challenges thought or attention; he always takes a
eak, unsuspecting individual to practice his art upon. He is really a
'eature of small consequence.
. Why tlwn so much prattle about "the snob?" Is it not because of our
ratic interpretations of attitudes, our own jealousies? The exclusive peo-
e are those who have an objective above ours, and so we say they are
1 wrong. We clamor for democracy when all the time we are denying
imebody the right of going his own quiet way. Certain policies and
stes, likes and dislikes, are. as inherently natural, as the "come join the
tnd" spirit. There is no snobbery or vanity about it.
When we gain the broader view of college we will become, first of all,
lerant of everyone; we will learn the magic lesson of forgetting; we will
hmire the frankness of men who accept us for what we are worth, mag-
nimously leaving us out of where we do not belong. Last of all we, too,
ill see that it is sometimes honest wisdom to "draw the latch-string in,
id close the door."

UNIVERSITY FINANCE

The war has accustomed us to such large figures that very few realize,
e magnitude of the task which our leading universities have undertaken
their "drives" for a proper equipment of teaching and a proper payment
the teacher. Thus the graduates of Harvard, who are assembled in Cam-
idge for the "Summer School" which is instructing them as to the com-
g campaign, speak lightly of the $11,000,000 which they are to raise and
nfidently of the 36,000 Harvard graduates from whom they are to raise it.
it if the Summer schooling of these financiers includes arithmetic, they
ust have discovered that the average gift of all Harvard graduates will
ye to be $305.' A billion dollars for the war has come to seem a negligi-
e detail; but in the family exchequer a dollar looms larger than ever
fore.
Statistics as to the earnings of college graduates bring little comfort.
ie average is considerably less than three thousand dollars, and this in
ite of the fact that in each class there may be several men whose income
measured by hundreds of thousands. The drive thus contemplates a levy
more than 10 per cent on the average annual income. And the college
aduate belongs to the class that has suffered most severely from the
r. Hand laborers have exacted an increase of wages which has fully
pt pace with the increased cost of living, and in many cases has out-
'ipped it; so. that workingmen have become profuse buyers of talking
,chines and automobiles, silks, furs, and jewels. The salaried brain
rker has had comparatively little and in many cases no increase of pay,
that many professional men now receive less than skilled mechanics.
.e of the posters prepared for the drive bears the legend: "A motorman
is 60 cents an hour, a professor 18. Which is worth more, gentlemen,
nding the train or training the mind?" But young lawyers, doctors, and
gineers are in rmuch the same boat as the professor, as are ministers of all
es. Even the very rich graduates have had large slices cut from their
comes by war taxation-a further levy of 10 per cent is no small matter for
y one.
Yet in all probability the drive will succeed. Its success will be of
Ad augury for other colleges where similar work must be done. Many of
e men assembled at Cambridge predict an over-subscription. They should
ow, if anybody. They know, for one thing, that the class of salaried brain
rkers to which the college graduate belongs has a record of loyalty and
crifice that is second to none. They have furnished most of the officers
d a large proportion of the men for our army; and those of them who.
re obliged to stay at home have been no less useful in Liberty Loan
ves and in general war work. As a class they have received little
Lise, or none; and their manifest grievances have been stated rather
n insisted upon, and very modestly stated at that. But they, if any
ss, may be counted on to rise to the call of duty.
That it is a duty there can be no question. ''he world stands in need
light and leading as never before. The integrity of our free institutions
menaced-at not a few points it is, for the time being, violated. Indus-
ally and socially the future of the world looks darker than most of us
e to admit. Only one power can ultimately prevail, the power of knowl-

On the Other Hand-
A dainty epistle in a feminine scroll
came in the mail the other day and
the author seems to be one of the
kind that wants to get back to school.
Here are the contents:
The Stagnant Summer Stude
I'm in the mood right now that I
Had when I used to fight,
And argue with my roomie,
Though she usually was right.
It makes me homesick for A2(*)
To feel this way again,
My convolutions will adhere,
And trick my silly pen.
My blasphemy when I cannot
Behold my favorite prof. ()
Is such as when I bolted
And was summoned when a soph.
My course is run. I cannot wait
To greet the teachers dear,
I hear their voices far above
The taxi battle cheer.
N 16.
*We hazard that this is swift stuff
for Ann Arbor.
**We didn't know anyone had a
favorite prof.
And then more:
A summer is a lonesome place
Unless one's green and blends
With all of the environment.
One loves the guy who sends
The Wolverine. Now may he get
The blessing that amends!
N 16.
If any of the birds that are mailing
this sheet to femmes and who think
their b. or b. wrote this just drop
down to the office and we'll tell you
the postmark on the envelope and
the' rest will be easy.
Many thanks, N 16, come again.
Is That So $
An item from Pontiac says, "Be-
cause motorists persist in disregard-
ing detour signs the Oakland Road
Commission has adopted the policy
of re-enforcing the barriers with a
liberal sprinkling of tacks. Several
machines have been stopped lately
this way.
He Does Too, at $60 Per Get
Down in Toledo there is a tailor by
the name of Paul Gettum.
Also there is a Kipling's Hat Shop
in the Maumee Valley. We wondered
why Rudyard had stopped writing.
There's
One nice thing
About eating in
These grab and grunts
Because if
You spill any soup
On your vest
It doesn't leave
Any
Grease.
Herm, Come Home to 'Em
A plea in the Chi Trib says: "Her-
man C. Werle; where are you? Emily
wants to know." Address 540 Bu-
chanan St., Gary, Ind.
Down in Toledo they have the orig-
inal six best cellars.
A letter just received from a friendl
of ours at the University of Wiscon-
sin contains this rather illuminating
though somewhat caustic comment:
"Things have been so ordinary around
here that there isn't much to write

you. They had a "Hello Day" here
Tuesday which gave all the old hens
a chance to greet their ideals. It was
good in every sense of the word."
-H.W.

Mr. James Hamilton, tenor, of the
School of Music faculty, and Mrs.
Maude Okkelberg, an alumna and
former member of the piano faculty,
will appear in a joint recital at 8
o'clock Wednesday evening in Hill
auditorium. The concert will be the
fifth in the series being given by the
School of Music during the Summer
term.
Both artists have been heard in Ann
Arbor on numerous occasions. Mr.
Hamilton will offer three groups, in-
cluding arias, songs, and three "negro
spirituals," while Mrs. Okkelberg will
render six piano solos.
The program follows:
Where'er You Walk...........Handel
Recitative: Deeper and Deeper Still
.andel
Aria: Waft her Angels through the
Skies.....................Hgndel
Mr. James Hamilton
Two Preludes ...............Chopin
Two Etudes.................Chopin
Mrs Maude Okkelberg
Aria, "Spirito Gentil" from "La
Favorita" .. . .............Donizetti
Mr. Hamilton
Prelude, Op. 2 ............. Scriabine
Siberian Waltz ........... Cyril Scott
De Amicitia ...........Carl Beecher
En Automne............Moszkowski
Mrs. Okkelberg
Negro Spirituals, arranged by H. T.
Burleigh.
By an' By
Weepin' Mary
Didn't It Rain?
Mr. hamilton
OMAhA CITY COMMISSION ACTS
TO REDUCE PRICES OF FOODS
Omaha, Neb., Aug. 4.-The city com-
mission authorized today the expendi-
ture of $10,000 in buying food supplies
to be sold to the public at cost. When
two commissioners suggested an inves-
tigation to learn if prices are too
high, the mayor shouted:
"Not on your life. I demand action
now. Help the people first, then in-
vestigate. We have got to do every-
thing we can to give the people the
necessities of life or be confronted by
an open insurrection."
Subscribe for The Wolverine. $.75
for the rest of the summer.

- -----

,

LEAVE YOUR FILMS
AT
QUARRY'S DRUG STORE
FOR
THE SWAINS
TO DEVELOP AND PRINT

SCHAEBERLE & SON, Music House
110 SO. MAIN ST.
Complete line of High Grade Pianos, Player
Pianos, Victrolas, Victor Records
All String and Wind
Instruments
SEE US FOR YOUR MUSICAL WANTS

Music Notes

I

Subscribe for Tlhe Wolverine. $.75
for the rest of the summer.

Bathing Suits
WE HAVE THE TWO PIECE KIND WITH
THE WHITE BELT
GEO J. MOE, "Sport Shop"

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 3o, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:io a.
i., and hourly to .: io p.M.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7 :48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (0x.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-s :oo a. m., 9:oS a.
m. and every two hours to 9:o5 p. m., 10:50
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. m., 12:26
a. m., i:ho a. m,, and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m. and
i120 p. M.

Mid=Su inmer
Sale
All Light
Three=.piece Suits
I=4_Off
N. F. ALLEN CO.
The House of i uppeahelmer in Ann Arbor

Absolutely...
The Coolest Place in Town
Air Changed Once a Minute
ICE CREAM and HOME
MADE CANDIES
The Sugar Bowl
Phone 967 189 SO. STATE
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The AnnArbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources........ $4,0000.0

1
'

Northwe
707

C,

I & turo

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